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On Coal River - Full Movie | Snagfilms
 
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Coal River Valley, West Virginia is a community surrounded by lush mountains and a looming toxic threat. Filmed over a period of five years, ON COAL RIVER follows a former miner and his neighbors in a David-and-Goliath struggle for the future of their valley, their children, and life as they know it. Ed Wiley once worked at the same coal plant that threatens his granddaughter's elementary school. When his local government refuses to act, Ed embarks on a quest to have the school relocated to safer ground. With a sharp sense of right and wrong, Ed confronts his local school board, the state government, and a notorious coal company for putting his granddaughter and his community at risk. Download Our Apple or Android Apps: http://bit.ly/Snag_Apps Watch Free Movies Online: http://bit.ly/snag_films Like Us On Facebook: http://bit.ly/snag_fb Follow Us On Twitter: http://bit.ly/Snag_Tweets
Views: 13594 SnagFilms
Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History
 
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Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Small-scale mining of surface deposits dates back thousands of years. For example, in Roman Britain, the Romans were exploiting most of the major coalfields by the late 2nd century AD. Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 9647 Classic History
Coal-Fueled Plant Closes; A Crisis For Native American Workers | NBC News
 
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The Navajo Generating Station and its sister coal mine are major sources of jobs and revenue for Native American communities in Arizona. Their closure has tribe members wondering how they can afford to stay on their ancestral lands. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Google+: http://nbcnews.to/PlusNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC Follow NBC News on Pinterest: http://nbcnews.to/PinNBC Coal-Fueled Plant Closes; A Crisis For Native American Workers | NBC News
Views: 4959 NBC News
BROKEN PROMISE: Coal Jobs Still Disappearing
 
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Trump repeatedly said he was bringing coal mingling jobs back. Oops. Cenk Uygur, the host of The Young Turks, tells you how he broke his promise. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. Read more here: https://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/trump-backing-pennsylvania-county-braces-for-layoffs-as-coal-mine-closure-threatens-hundreds-of-jobs/ “President Donald Trump may have ended the so-called “war on coal,” but that doesn’t seem to have changed the fortunes of the coal-mining industry as a whole. Local news station WTVA reports that 370 coal miners are expected to be unemployed after a coal mine located in Greene County, Pennsylvania closes for good this year. The mine closing would all but wipe out any gains made in coal mining employment since Trump’s election, as the coal industry has so far added just 500 jobs over the last year. Blair Zimmerman, a retired coal miner who now serves as Greene County’s chairman of county commissioners, tells WTVA that the mine closing will be a major blow for the entire area. “Layoffs are bad, but when it comes to shutting down a mine, that’s as bad as it gets,” he said. Zimmerman said that, despite the election of Trump, the low price of natural gas has continued to hammer the coal industry, just as it did during the Obama administration. In all, Zimmerman said that it’s very hard to see coal coming back as Trump has repeatedly promised.” Hosts: Cenk Uygur Cast: Cenk Uygur *** The Largest Online News Show in the World. Hosted by Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian. LIVE STREAMING weekdays 6-8pm ET. https://goo.gl/tJpj1m Subscribe to The Young Turks on YouTube: https://goo.gl/a3JY9i Like The Young Turks on Facebook: https://goo.gl/txrhrh Follow The Young Turks on Twitter: https://goo.gl/w6ahdV Buy TYT Merch: https://goo.gl/KVysaM Download audio and video of the full two hour show on-demand + the members-only post game show by becoming a member at https://goo.gl/v8E64M. Your membership supports the day to day operations and is vital for our continued success and growth. Young Turk (n), 1. Young progressive or insurgent member of an institution, movement, or political party. 2. A young person who rebels against authority or societal expectations.(American Heritage Dictionary)
Views: 90890 The Young Turks
Take A Ride Into A Mine (CBS News)
 
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Web Exclusive: Bob Simon is reporting this Sunday on the coal industry and some of the hazards miners face. As part of the report, "60 Minutes" went deep into a mine. Come along for the ride! (CBSNews.com)
Views: 276682 CBS News
On Coal River Director Adams Wood Interview at Mountainfilm
 
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Ali Carr Troxell speaks with director Adams Wood about his film On Coal River. The film chronicles the efforts of a group of residents in the small West Virginia town of Coal River to stop the practice of mountain top removal coal mining. OUTSIDE TELEVISION - http://www.outsidetelevision.com/ SUBSCRIBE to our channel - http://www.youtube.com/Outsidetelevision LIKE us on FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/outsidetelevision FOLLOW us on TWITTER - https://twitter.com/Outside_TV OutsideTelevision OutsideTV television TV outside outdoor adventure environment travel active lifestyle destinations MountainFilm mountainfilm Colorado Telluride FilmFestival festival film WildAndScenic environmental independent humanitarian action documentary interview director activist conservation awareness AliCarrTroxell director AdamsWood OnCoalRiver WestVirginia town of CoalRiver stop of MountainTopRemovalCoalMining
Views: 134 Outside TV
America's Post-Coal Country Is Struggling To Come Back (HBO)
 
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For years, politicians have promised to bring jobs and prosperity back to America’s depressed coal-producing regions. But that won’t be so easy to pull off, because in many places the industry didn’t so much decline as vanish. Josh Hersh went to a coal town in West Virginia where the way forward doesn’t lead back to the mines. Watch: "A group of Trump supporters went on tour to spread a message of peace" - http://bit.ly/2j0q9MT Read: "Here's who could actually do something about Trump's potential conflicts of interest" - http://bit.ly/2j4BEqX Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo
Views: 44592 VICE News
Blasting on Coal River Mountain, as soon as TODAY!
 
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This four-minute video clip, featuring the voices of local residents Judy Bonds and Gary Anderson, describes in vivid terms the battle to save Coal River Mountain. As Massey Energy Company begins the devastating process of mountaintop removal coal mining, local residents hope to convince decision makers to adopt their plan to build a major wind farm on the ridge instead. Studies have shown this plan would bring more long-term tax revenue to the local economy and safer, permanent jobs while protecting nearby communities from the effects of mountaintop removal. Residents worry that an eight-billion gallon toxic coal sludge dam will rupture when the blasting begins. If the dam broke, the tidal wave of toxic sludge released could endanger thousands and would dwarf the destruction of the December 2008 TVA coal ash disaster. As bulldozing begins to prep part of Coal River Mountain for mountaintop removal, some people are engaged in direct action to forestall it. The Mark Vann Song - by The Larry Keel Experience http://www.LarryKeel.com
Views: 558 ClimateGndZero
Blasting on Coal River Mountain, as soon as TODAY!
 
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This four-minute video clip, featuring the voices of local residents Judy Bonds and Gary Anderson, describes in vivid terms the battle to save Coal River Mountain. As Massey Energy Company begins the devastating process of mountaintop removal coal mining, local residents hope to convince decision makers to adopt their plan to build a major wind farm on the ridge instead. Studies have shown this plan would bring more long-term tax revenue to the local economy and safer, permanent jobs while protecting nearby communities from the effects of mountaintop removal. Residents worry that an eight-billion gallon toxic coal sludge dam will rupture when the blasting begins. If the dam broke, the tidal wave of toxic sludge released could endanger thousands and would dwarf the destruction of the December 2008 TVA coal ash disaster. As bulldozing begins to prep part of Coal River Mountain for mountaintop removal, some people are engaged in direct action to forestall it. The Mark Vann Song - by The Larry Keel Experience http://www.LarryKeel.com
Views: 11102 ClimateGndZero
Coal Rush (FULL DOCUMENTARY)
 
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Filmed over 5 years in the coalfields of West Virginia, COAL RUSH follows the relentless battle for justice of a rural Appalachian community against a major coal company accused of polluting their drinking water. Husband-and-wife team of independent filmmakers LORENA LUCIANO and FILIPPO PISCOPO shine a spotlight on one of the worst (yet least publicized) industrial contamination disasters in the United States -- billions of gallons of coal waste dumped in the waterways and dwarfing the BP Gulf oil spill. Granted exclusive access by the legal team, and capturing with eloquent cinema verite'-style the local community's everyday life, the directors expose a serious case of environmental wrongdoing from all angles – including the coal company's standpoint -­ while bringing an important story of human suffering into focus. COAL RUSH offers an unprecedented look at some of the most pressing social and environmental issues in America today – concerns over toxins in US tap water, rural poverty, corporate malfeasance, and government failings – through the universally-appealing story of a highly controversial legal saga.
Views: 13305 The Orchard On Demand
# 4 Mine, Stone, Ky
 
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Video of #4 Mine, Stone, Ky - filmed by Roger Hardesty in 1990. This is rough footage which I plan to edit later.
Views: 57585 Ryan Hardesty
Kill Coal Jobs
 
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Doug Reynolds is on the Hillary Clinton Team
Coal Miner to Trump: “Coal Mining Isn’t Coming Back” | NYT - Opinion
 
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A fifth-generation coal miner from Appalachia tells Trump his plan to loosen regulations on coal-fired plants not only is harmful to the environment, but also bad for the future of the region. Read more: https://nyti.ms/2LjD3n5 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n More from The New York Times Video: http://nytimes.com/video ---------- Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.
Views: 26503 The New York Times
Coal River Mountain, WV: Coal River Wind Project
 
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America's Most Endangered Mountains - Coal River Mountain, WV Pledge to Help End Mountaintop Removal. Visit: www.iLoveMountains.org - - - COMMUNITY STORY - - - "We don't live where they mine coal. They mine coal where we live.... Our concern today is our homes, our environment, and the sustainability of the environment." Lorelei Scarbro's house in the little community of Rock Creek, West Virginia is the same house her husband built with his own two hands when they were married, on land handed down to him from his parents. They raised their children in this house. Lorelei watches the deer in the field below, enjoys a fresh mountain stream running by the property and says that her granddaughter takes particular delight in the wild turkeys that frequent the neighborhood. Her husband, a coal miner for 35 years who died of of black lung, is buried in the family cemetery next to their home. Lorelei's property in Rock Creek borders Coal River Mountain, one of the most beautiful mountains in the Coal River Valley of West Virginia, and one of the few untouched mountains in the region. Miles of pristine creeks and waterfalls, horseback trails and stunning vistas are often overlooked as a prime eco-tourism location. Now Coal River Mountain is slated for a mountaintop removal coal mine. If the coal company's plans go through, nearly 10 square miles of the mountain will be destroyed, and 18 valley fills will devastate the Coal River watershed. But residents in the Coal River Valley have joined together to propose a new idea - one of sustainable energy. In 2006, a study of the wind potential on Coal River Mountain demonstrated that the mountain is an ideal location for developing utility-scale wind power. The proposed Coal River Wild Project would produce enough wind power to keep the lights on in 150,000 homes, pump $20 million per year in direct local spending during construction, and $2 million per year thereafter. It would create hundreds of jobs and allow other uses of the land that would benefit local communities. Sustainable forestry, tourism, and harvesting of ginseng and other wild plants are just a few options for Coal River residents that would ultimately preserve the natural environment of Coal River Mountain for generations to come.
Views: 110520 iLoveMountainsOrg
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
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There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 198888 VICE News
Treesit on Coal River Mountain
 
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Two protesters associated with the RAMPS Campaign halted blasting on a portion of Alpha Natural Resources' Bee Tree mountaintop removal mine on Coal River Mountain today by ascending two trees. Catherine-Ann MacDougal, 24, and Becks Kolins, 21, are on platforms approximately 80 feet off the ground within 300 feet of active blasting on the mine. The banners hanging from their platforms read "Stop Strip Mining" and "For Judy Bonds" in honor of strip mining activist Julia "Judy" Bonds of Packsville, W.Va. who died of cancer earlier this year. The activists demand that Alpha Natural Resources stop strip mining on Coal River Mountain and that the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection prohibit future strip mining in the Coal River Watershed.
Views: 1708 RAMPScampaign
The Basin: Where coal is life, Trump seen as savior
 
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In the coal town of Gillette, Wyoming, residents feel hopeful with Donald Trump in the White House, but experts urge caution. SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: https://www.youtube.com/ABCNews/ Watch More on http://abcnews.go.com/ LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/abcnews FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/abc GOOD MORNING AMERICA'S HOMEPAGE: https://gma.yahoo.com/
Views: 7020 ABC News
The Pennsylvania Miners' Story Movie (Drama)
 
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Based on the real-life chronicle of the "nine for nine" Pennsylvania coal miners who were rescued in the summer of 2002. Told from their own perspective, the movie reveals their extraordinary experience and, takes viewers inside the mine (shot in real mines and recreated on a soundstage) to show the life-threatening dangers and physical limitations the men faced for 77 hours as they waited for rescue. The movie was shot in many of the actual locations in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, including scenes at the real-life Quecreek mine.
Views: 16913 Juma Kendit
Appalachia Grasps For Hope As Coal Jobs Fade
 
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(1 Dec 2015) FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: apus043239 The seams of coal in some of Eddie Asbury's mines in McDowell County are so thin workers can barely squeeze down them. They enter on carts nearly flat on their backs, the roof of the mine coursing by just a few inches in front of their faces. They don't stand up all day. To keep his business operating with such a paltry amount of coal, Asbury has to do everything himself. He has no use for the shiny, multimillion-dollar mining machines. His equipment is secondhand stuff that he repairs and refurbishes. The coal he and his workers scrape out of the mountain is washed and prepared for sale in a plant Asbury and a colleague built themselves. Even coal is barely surviving in coal country - and coal is about the only thing that Central Appalachia has. West Virginia is the only state in the country where more than half of adults are not working, according to the Census Bureau. It is tied with Kentucky for the highest percentage of residents collecting disability payments from Social Security, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. And the death rate among working-age adults is highest in the nation, 55 percent higher the national average, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And now the one main source for decent-paying work, the brutal life of coal, seems to be drying up for good. The thick, easy, cheap coal is gone, global competition is fierce, and clean air and water regulations are increasing costs and cutting into demand. Central Appalachia's struggle is familiar to many rural regions across the U.S., where middle-class jobs are disappearing or gone and young people have no other choice than to leave to find opportunity. But the problems are amplified in coal country, where these difficult economic and social conditions have gripped the region for decades and where there is hardly any flat land to build anything. But this crisis - and the realization that there won't be another coal boom in these parts - is leading to a growing understanding that new approaches are needed to help Central Appalachia emerge from decades of deep poverty, under-education and poor health. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/313442b26047530d3e109f7be575cced Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 71 AP Archive
Coal mining west virginia
 
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Donald Trump yet to deliver promise to end Barack Obama's 'war on coal' but locals hopeful the worst is far behind them
Views: 16475 Stephanie March
Appalachia Grasps For Hope As Coal Jobs Fade
 
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(1 Dec 2015) The seams of coal in some of Eddie Asbury's mines in McDowell County are so thin workers can barely squeeze down them. They enter on carts nearly flat on their backs, the roof of the mine coursing by just a few inches in front of their faces. They don't stand up all day. To keep his business operating with such a paltry amount of coal, Asbury has to do everything himself. He has no use for the shiny, multimillion-dollar mining machines. His equipment is secondhand stuff that he repairs and refurbishes. The coal he and his workers scrape out of the mountain is washed and prepared for sale in a plant Asbury and a colleague built themselves. Even coal is barely surviving in coal country - and coal is about the only thing that Central Appalachia has. West Virginia is the only state in the country where more than half of adults are not working, according to the Census Bureau. It is tied with Kentucky for the highest percentage of residents collecting disability payments from Social Security, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. And the death rate among working-age adults is highest in the nation, 55 percent higher the national average, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And now the one main source for decent-paying work, the brutal life of coal, seems to be drying up for good. The thick, easy, cheap coal is gone, global competition is fierce, and clean air and water regulations are increasing costs and cutting into demand. Central Appalachia's struggle is familiar to many rural regions across the U.S., where middle-class jobs are disappearing or gone and young people have no other choice than to leave to find opportunity. But the problems are amplified in coal country, where these difficult economic and social conditions have gripped the region for decades and where there is hardly any flat land to build anything. But this crisis - and the realization that there won't be another coal boom in these parts - is leading to a growing understanding that new approaches are needed to help Central Appalachia emerge from decades of deep poverty, under-education and poor health. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2448b6e2f3902f9a174a70b378ef6ce6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 81 AP Archive
In Coal Country, a Community Fights for Wind | National Geographic
 
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In the heart of West Virginia's coal country, organizers fight for a wind farm that could save Coal River Mountain, where a mining operation is under way. This video features footage from "Overburden," a documentary in progress that chronicles one town's struggle to chart its energy future in the shadow of the coal industry. Learn more at http://thecoalwar.com. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Read more about the future of coal online in National Geographic magazine: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/04/coal/nijhuis-text STORY AND VIDEOGRAPHY: Chad A. Stevens PRODUCERS: Catherine Orr and Elena Rue CONSULTING EDITOR: Toby Shimin EDITORS: Catherine Orr, Elena Rue and Caitlyn Greene ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE: Chris Carmichael and Shaena Mallett AERIAL FOOTAGE: Adolfo Doring, Michael Kelem, and Amanda Zackem. Made possible by Appalachian Voices and the Wallace Global Fund MUSIC: Mountain Man, Tyler Strickland, Mark Geary, Jeff Claus, Judy Hyman, and Moby, courtesy http://mobygratis.com In Coal Country, a Community Fights for Wind | National Geographic https://youtu.be/ZKOavgDCQYo National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 17415 National Geographic
The Cost of Coal: West Virginia (extraction)
 
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http://www.sierraclub.org/costofcoal Award-winning photojournalist Ami Vitale traveled with SIERRA magazine to West Virginia. Mountaintop-removal mines in Appalachia have demolished an estimated 1.4 million acres of forested hills, buried an estimated 2,000 miles of streams, poisoned drinking water, and wiped whole towns from the map. SIERRA asked people to describe how the world's dirtiest energy source has disrupted their lives—and what they're doing to stop it. - Founded by legendary conservationist John Muir in 1892, the Sierra Club is now the nation's largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization -- with more than two million members and supporters. Our successes range from protecting millions of acres of wilderness to helping pass the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Endangered Species Act. More recently, we've made history by leading the charge to address climate disruption by moving away from the dirty fossil fuels and toward a clean energy economy. Visit us here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SierraClub Twitter: https://twitter.com/sierraclub Instagram: https://instagram.com/sierraclub
Views: 2771 NationalSierraClub
Underground Coal Mine - Goofing Off
 
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Fletch, Mikey and Me on the Man Bus. Goofing off on our way outside. Taylor Fork. "Underground Coal Mine" Eastern, Ky
Views: 17864 DolittleMccoy
Search continues for 3 people trapped in West Virginia coal mine
 
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A desperate search is underway for three people believed to be trapped deep inside an abandoned West Virginia coal mine. Four people were reported missing on Saturday, but one emerged from the mine Monday night. He told investigators the other three are still alive inside the mine. Chip Reid reports. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B Delivered by Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 4149 CBS This Morning
Water Runs Dry in Wyoming Coal Country
 
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As coal mines grew and oil and gas wells came to the Power River Basin, LJ Turner lost not only his ranch's abundant water, but also 6,000 acres he once leased as grazing land. Now his cattle herd is half what it was, calves near the coal mines die at alarming rates, and he has had to spend thousands of dollars drilling deeper and deeper wells. Over the last 40 years, Turner and some of his neighbors have paid a heavy price for the development of energy resources. So have American taxpayers everywhere. The federal government owns most of the coal, oil and gas in the ground, and it has fostered mining and drilling through a host of subsidies that permit fossil fuel corporations to privatize the benefits while socializing many of the costs. Read the story, "How Federal Giveaways to Big Coal Leave Ranchers and Taxpayers Out in the Cold " by InsideClimate News: https://insideclimatenews.org/news/29122017/wyoming-powder-river-basin-coal-subsidies-climate-change-oil-gas-trump Part of Choke Hold, a series of stories by InsideClimate News that examines the fossil fuel industry's fight against climate policy, science and clean energy.
Views: 1198 InsideClimate News
2018 Coal Mine WV
 
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Views: 176 Andrea Gibbas
Coal keeps grasp on West Virginia despite environment concerns
 
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As the US tries to pave the way in climate protection, the country's coal production has been on the decline. In addition to the environmental impact coal mining has left, communities are now feeling the economic effects of this recent shift.
Views: 2254 AFP news agency
Good Jobs ... With a Family Wage
 
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Watch Shane Evans, a mine dispatcher at Arch Coal's Thunder Basin Coal Company, talk about how he ended up mining coal after earning a degree in business economics - and how important leaving a positive environmental legacy for his young son is to him. To learn more visit http://www.americaspower.org/real-people/shane
Views: 1690 balancedenergy
Brooklyn- Abandoned Coal Town- West Virginia
 
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The town of Brooklyn was among the many coal towns that arose during the coal boom in the late 1800s in the state of West Virginia. The forgotten town now lies deep in the New River mountains just a shadow of its former self...nothing remaining but a few crumbling structures.
Osage: A town forgotten
 
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Osage,W.Va. is a town that has long been forgotten. The Scotts Run area, where Osage is located, was full of coal mines creating thousands of jobs for the thousands of immigrants who came to the United States in the early 90s. When coal mines left so did the people leaving Osage as somewhat of a ghost town and a place of crime and drugs However, for the residents who remain, there pride for the town still stands strong.
Views: 4441 abodkins1
Coal Mine Erbacon WV
 
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Me deliverin' stone to a coal mine
Views: 7162 jaynsteph79
New Coal Mines After $90M Investment
 
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Ramaco Development appears to be bucking the overall downward trend in the coal industry by opening up two new mines. Though the rest of the coal industry is reporting closed mines and bankruptcies, the Kentucky-based company has picked out these new mines and will be investing $90 million in getting them opened. West Virginia's Elk Creek Mine and Virginia's Berwind Mine are expected to operate for around 17 years. The mines will provide over 400 jobs in areas where the unemployment rate is at least triple the national average. Ramaco plans to start shipping coal from these mines by 2018, noting that they are already talking to potential buyers and seeking out contracts. http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2016-09-06-US--New%20Coal%20Mines/id-4f5dbdcd3c1d427cb60b66fd15ee890b http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
Views: 226 Wochit News
A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A COAL MINER
 
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Some videos I took at work on a surface coal mine in West Virginia.
Views: 28953 WV24985
Amfire Mining Company sold to Rosebud Mining
 
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Reported by: Jackalyn Kovac KITTANNING, Pa. -- A mining company operating in seven central Pennsylvania counties has changed hands. Amfire Mining was sold by Alpha Natural Resources to Rosebud Mining. But now, more than 400 employees are in limbo on whether they will still have a job with the company. On Tuesday, Alpha Natural Resources announced Amfire Mining Company was officially part of Rosebud Mining Company, completing a transaction that was first announced months ago. The $86 million deal includes ten mines and four preparation plants and loadouts in seven counties: Cambria, Centre, Clearfield, Elk, Greene, Indiana and Somerset. A media spokesperson for Alpha Natural Resources said the deal was a good business practice because of Amfire's locations. Two of Alpha's affiliates continue to operate in Pennsylvania near Waynesburg, Green County, with more than 1,100 workers. The spokesperson said Amfire workers were given a WARN notice back in November, and they will likely have to reapply for their jobs with Rosebud. 6 News attempted to contact Rosebud executive vice president Jim Barker for comment, but he has not responded at this time.
Views: 673 WJACTV Johnstown
The Cost of Coal - mountaintop removal in West Virginia
 
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WATE TV on mountaintop removal, featuring retired miner Chuck Nelson and Chris Hamilton, West Virginia coal association
Views: 2266 mountainjustice
Mine Punch Out
 
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This is a miner punching out of the hill at a coal mine in Mingo County, WV.
Views: 3389 Jennifer Adkins
Red Jacket coal camp in Mingo County, West Virginia.
 
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The Red Jacket Coal Camp was originally built by the Red Jacket Consolidated Coal & Coke Co. and later taken over by Island Creek Coal Co. Red Jacket is located just a couple miles outside of Matewan in Mingo County.
Mining WV
 
10:17
Mining in WV
Views: 2585 tomstanleywv
Pinnacle Mine is idle, future is uncertain for hundreds of coal miners
 
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2:00 Saturday, Oct. 6 2018 UPDATE: Bobby Bowman, President of United Mine Workers of America Local 1713 tells 59 News those working in Pinnacle Mine have not been laid off yet. He explained miners will lose their jobs in the coming weeks after the work of moving equipment is complete.
Views: 58 59 News
CONSOL Energy selling 5 W.Va. coal mines
 
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CONSOL Energy has struck a $3.5 billion deal to sell all five of its longwall coal mines in West Virginia, as well as its river and dock operations, which includes 600 barges and 21 towboats.
Views: 877 WTAE-TV Pittsburgh
Coal Mining Black Panther mine Mine #1
 
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Oaktown In Black Panther. Miss working with all these guys Sunrise owns it now i got Layed off so i dont work there anymore. But i put in 6 years for the company before they layed me off
Views: 6695 1982jmw
As Coal Goes
 
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Once the most formidable industry in West Virginia, coal is progressively losing its economic dominance throughout Central Appalachia as production slows due to tightening pollution controls, greater availability of cheap natural gas and growing competition from other coal basins. Uncertainty about the region's economic future and stability of miners' livelihoods has grown in recent years. Residents and lawmakers are left trying to find solutions to a problem that is difficult to fully anticipate.
The Last Mountain OFFICIAL TRAILER
 
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In theaters: January 21st, 2011 In the valleys of Appalachia, a battle is being fought over a mountain, the consequences of which affect every American; it's a battle that has taken innocent lives and threatens to take more. It is a battle over protecting our health and environment from the destructive power of Big Coal. Mining and burning coal is at the epicenter of America's struggle to balance its energy needs with environmental and health concerns. Nowhere is that concern greater than in Coal River Valley, West Virginia, where a small but passionate group of ordinary citizens are trying to stop Big Coal corporations, like Massey Energy, from continuing the devastating practice of Mountain Top Removal. David, himself, never faced a Goliath like Big Coal. The group argues that Mountain Top Removal-using dynamite to blast off a mountain's surface-pollutes the air and water implicit in their neighbors' deaths, eliminates traditional mining jobs and spreads pollution to other states. Despite support for their claims, Big Coal repeats Mountain Top Removal daily, amassing huge profits that allow their Washington lobbyists to wield influence in both political parties, rewrite environmental laws and avoid violations. The desire to stop Mountain Top Removal comes from a belief that we share responsibility for protecting the air and water; its what drives the group and their supporters from outside of Appalachia, like Robert Kennedy, Jr., to keep fighting. Honoring ordinary Americans fighting for what they believe in, THE LAST MOUNTAIN shines a light on our energy needs and how those needs are being met. Their fight is for a future that affects us all.
Views: 1546 SneekPeeknLeaks
Burning coal mine in West Virginia
 
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hatfield mccoys trails
Views: 8286 marsh1998
Protect America's Coal Jobs and Make Mining's Voice Heard!
 
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With 26 million Americans now unemployed or underemployed, our nation's extraordinary, domestic reserves of coal are more critical than ever before - especially as a source of abundant, low-cost electricity capable of powering and sustaining a robust, long-term recovery. Even at a time of great economic stress, EPA is poised to enact a series of back-door mandates that threaten millions of American jobs and increases the cost of every household's electricity-rates. Collectively, it's called the EPA "Train Wreck" - and it's right around the bend. Together, we need to oppose these regulations and urge our representatives to do the same.
Views: 203 NationalMining
DN! Anti-Coal Activists Hold WV Protest
 
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Anti-Coal Activists Hold WV Protest In the United States, dozens of people gathered outside the offices of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection Monday for a rally against mountaintop removal mining. The activists called for an immediate end to mountaintop removal, beginning with the blasting underway at Coal River Mountain, the last intact mountain on the historic Coal River Mountain range. The protesters included the environmental activist and attorney Robert Kennedy, Jr.
Views: 538 StartLoving2
Miner's Helper LLC Coal Mine Arm at the 2007 Bluefield WV Coal Show
 
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Miner's Helper LLC located in Beckley, West Virginia has designed a piece of equipment (robotic arm, pat. pend.) to help make belt moves easier and safer for the Coal Miner. Reducing the number of lost time accidents by helping to prevent injuries of the Coal Miner's backs and hands there by lowering the number of Workers Comp claims and that will also lower insurance premiums for the Coal Operator. For more information, please contact: Miner's Helper LLC PO Box 1065 Beckley, WV 25802 ph # 304-237-8555 fax # 877-349-6983
Views: 1211 MrTomSlickster
Columbia - Child coal mining situation addressed
 
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T/I: 10:56:52 In Colombia parents are coming together to rescue their children from the highly dangerous job of underground coal mining. Driven by economic need, child coal miners are employed by mine operators in some of the most hazardous work conditions. Growing local and international concern about the situation has led to the formation of community action programmes intended to stop child labour in the mines. Children, parents and social workers meet to discuss economic and educational alternatives that will help to break the syndrome of poverty and child labour. Consequently, children are learning to create artworks made out of coal that can be sold in the city craft shops. SHOWS: COLOMBIA, RECENT Young boy pushing coal trolley; Young boy digging coal with huge shovel; Young boy piling coal ; Two boys and dog, going up shaft with coal using rope; CU Javier, SOT in Spanish ("When someone's tired and they need a break, the foreman makes them work"); Families at community action group meeting; Woman addressing meeting; CU woman listening; COLOMBIA , RECENT CU pile of coal, pan to children in workshop; CU boy sculpting coal; CU little boy wearing mask, tilt-down to him carving coal; CU boy speaking, SOT in Spanish WS exterior workshop with children standing at door; CU children smiling; 2.40 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/acaffc8e052f70654263cf7c9aa02429 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 612 AP Archive