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Secrets of the Moab Desert - Potholes & Tardigrades ~ 4K
 
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Watch in 4K Ultra HD as National Park Ranger Karen Garthwait talks about the amazing life-forms found in a pothole in Arches National Park; from tadpole shrimp to the seemingly indestructible tardigrades, as well as biological soil crust, and the importance of conservation in our public lands. The area surrounding the town of Moab in Southern Utah includes Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, Dead Horse Point, Fisher Towers, Salt Flats Recreation Area and many historic archeological and paleontological sites. This is a preview from the new theater film now playing in 4K at the Moab Information Center / Visitor Center in Southern Utah. Produced for Canyonlands Natural History Association and the Moab Travel Council. For visitor information, visit www.cnha.org. DM-697 Moab Conservation Trailer YT 4K 2ps 40mbps
Views: 4878 finleyholiday
Microbiologic crusts on alluvial fans
 
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A brief discussion on cryptogamic or microbiologic crusts forming on a young alluvial fan.
Deseert varnish on the rocks of Colorado National Monument, Grand Junction, Colorado
 
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Desert varnish (also called rock varnish) forms on stable rock surfaces from particles of clay along with iron and manganese oxides and some trace elements and organic matter. The color of the varnish varies from shades of brown to black and can be seen of rock surfaces from many kilometres away. In this video I'm hiking the Liberty Cap, Ute Canyon, and corkscrew trails where the City of Grand Junction (and the Grand Valley) are clearly visible - and, the desert varnish can be seen from down below as well. Here's my page about science: http://www.rogerwendell.com/science.html Here's my personal web page about hiking: http://www.rogerwendell.com/hiking.html 11-11-2009
Views: 344 zeekzilch
Cradle of Life
 
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Learn about how plant life can survive in an ever changing dune field.
Zorica Svircev Presentation Bremen 2011
 
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IMPORTANCE OF BIOLOGICAL LOESS CRUSTS FOR LOESS FORMATION IN SEMI-ARID ENVIRONMENTS
Views: 509 LaperNS
Lichen, Fungi, Moss, Mushroom, Flora, Plants Part 10 of 13 - Nature Ecosystem of Western N America
 
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www.thenatureexplorers.com DESCRIPTION: The Nature Explorers creates naturalist cinéma-vérité style documentary videos, audio recordings, and photographs. This documentation serves as a record of the flora and fauna species inhabiting the ecosystems during the specific time frame and can be used in the future as a reference to how the ecosystems are constantly evolving as well as the affects on them by anthropogenic activities. These ecosystem videos, audio recordings, and photographs are presented in a format so they may be used for educational instruction and testing purposes as well as scientific study of the ecosystems, therefore narrations have been left out and classical music used in the background when no natural sound is available, ultimately leaving the videos for self interpretation, individual discovery, and for professors to explain or show as examples in a classroom setting. Expeditions usually take place in an area of five square miles over 7-21 days during which time the flora, fauna, geology, weather, and landscapes of the ecosystem are all documented. The Nature Explorers do not seek out, bait, or wait for species, filming only what is encountered while exploring the ecosystem on foot. EXPEDITION LIST: Dark Canyon Expedition, Utah/USA - May 2011 South Flaming Gorge Expedition, Utah/USA - May 2011 Ishawooa Expedition, Wyoming/USA - June 2011 Kooskooskia Expedition, Idaho/USA - June 2011 Hells Canyon Expedition, Idaho/USA - July 2011 Umatilla Expedition, Oregon/USA - July 2011 Ochoco Black Canyon Expedition, Oregon/USA - August 2011 Mt. Jefferson Expedition, Oregon/USA - September 2011 Yolly Bolly Expedition, California/USA - October 2011 Redwoods Temperate Rainforest Expedition, California/USA - January 2012 Siuslaw Temperate Rainforest Expedition, Oregon/USA - February 2012 Santiam Temperate Rainforest Expedition, Oregon/USA - March 2012 Olympic Temperate Rainforest Expedition, Washington/USA - April 2012 Wenatchee Expedition, Washington/USA - May 2012 Channeled Scablands Expedition, Washington/USA - May 2012 Kaniksu Temperate Rainforest Expedition, Washington/USA - June 2012 Kootenai Temperate Rainforest Expedition, Montana/USA - June 2012 Bob Marshall Temperate Rainforest Expedition, Montana/USA - July 2012 Lemhi Expedition, Idaho/USA - August 2012 Beaver Dam Slough Expedition, Idaho/USA - August 2012 Uinta Expedition, Utah/USA - September 2012 White River Expedition, Colorado/USA - September 2012 Collegiate Peaks Expedition, Colorado/USA - October 2012 El Rio De Las Animas Perdidas En Purgatorio Expedition, Colorado/USA - November 2012 Amistad Expedition, Texas/USA - March 2014 Chihuahuan Desert Expedition, Texas/USA - May 2014 - May 2016
What Is The State Of Matter Of The Outer Core Of The Earth?
 
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"What Is The State Of Matter Of The Outer Core Of The Earth? Watch more videos for more knowledge What Is The State Of Matter Of The Outer Core Of ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/GlWk42qVC4A What Is The State Of Matter Of The Mantle Of The ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/0iAEyMUIZIk Is The Inner Core A Liquid Or A Solid? https://www.youtube.com/watch/CXl3Ms_DGCA The Mystery of the Earth's Core Explained https://www.youtube.com/watch/XXTEWQdu3aE Different Layers of the Earth | It's Interior, Structure ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/hmgR4PiGp1E Inside the Earth | IkenEdu https://www.youtube.com/watch/N9ncfAsmiSg Is The Mantle A Liquid Or A Solid? https://www.youtube.com/watch/XThi6iwqlMY Structure of the Earth - Inside our earth https://www.youtube.com/watch/-oQc_49IoCo What Is The Layer Of The Earth That Is Liquid? https://www.youtube.com/watch/XOLL9Mbx8fE Layers of the Earth https://www.youtube.com/watch/Q9j1xGaxYzY Earth's core deprived of oxygen https://www.youtube.com/watch/BF_w5UsIH6s Science - Layers of earth (with Animation) and ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/-8joRDZNmMA Structure of the Earth https://www.youtube.com/watch/4AxZ-6MOznY%26vl%3Den Earth - Layers , Inside Earth - Lesson for Kids ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/Sxd-wGMfNxw Science - Layers of earth - Telugu https://www.youtube.com/watch/h0uSNiSI1mE Why Does The Earth Have Layers? https://www.youtube.com/watch/WwiiOjyfvAU "
Views: 187 Tedfri Teff
Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge
 
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U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center America's Wildest Places - Volume 3 Touring America's National Wildlife Refuges Get ready for another set of adventures on the National Wildlife Refuge System! Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge Desert Wilderness Arizona
Views: 1178 PublicResourceOrg
John Day Fossil Beds National Monument | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: John Day Fossil Beds National Monument 00:02:16 1 Geography 00:05:35 2 History 00:12:32 3 Geology and paleontology 00:18:52 4 Climate 00:20:03 5 Biology 00:20:12 5.1 Flora 00:22:55 5.2 Fauna 00:26:02 6 Activities 00:29:11 7 See also 00:29:26 8 Notes and references Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is a U.S. National Monument in Wheeler and Grant counties in east-central Oregon. Located within the John Day River basin and managed by the National Park Service, the park is known for its well-preserved layers of fossil plants and mammals that lived in the region between the late Eocene, about 45 million years ago, and the late Miocene, about 5 million years ago. The monument consists of three geographically separate units: Sheep Rock, Painted Hills, and Clarno. The units cover a total of 13,944 acres (5,643 ha) of semi-desert shrublands, riparian zones, and colorful badlands. About 210,000 people frequented the park in 2016 to engage in outdoor recreation or to visit the Thomas Condon Paleontology Center or the James Cant Ranch Historic District. Before the arrival of Euro-Americans in the 19th century, the John Day basin was frequented by Sahaptin people who hunted, fished, and gathered roots and berries in the region. After road-building made the valley more accessible, settlers established farms, ranches, and a few small towns along the river and its tributaries. Paleontologists have been unearthing and studying the fossils in the region since 1864, when Thomas Condon, a missionary and amateur geologist, recognized their importance and made them known globally. Parts of the basin became a National Monument in 1975. Averaging about 2,200 feet (670 m) in elevation, the monument has a dry climate with temperatures that vary from summer highs of about 90 °F (32 °C) to winter lows below freezing. The monument has more than 80 soil types that support a wide variety of flora, ranging from willow trees near the river to grasses on alluvial fans to cactus among rocks at higher elevations. Fauna include more than 50 species of resident and migratory birds. Large mammals like elk and smaller animals such as raccoons, coyotes, and voles frequent these units, which are also populated by a wide variety of reptiles, fish, butterflies, and other creatures adapted to particular niches of a mountainous semi-desert terrain.
Views: 10 wikipedia tts
Bryce Canyon National Park | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Bryce Canyon National Park 00:01:45 1 Geography and climate 00:04:40 2 History 00:04:49 2.1 Native American habitation 00:05:58 2.2 European American exploration and settlement 00:08:03 2.3 Creation of the park 00:10:58 2.4 More recent history 00:11:58 3 Geology 00:14:39 4 Ecology 00:17:03 5 Activities 00:19:55 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Bryce Canyon National Park () is an American national park located in southwestern Utah. The major feature of the park is Bryce Canyon, which despite its name, is not a canyon, but a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. Bryce is distinctive due to geological structures called hoodoos, formed by frost weathering and stream erosion of the river and lake bed sedimentary rocks. The red, orange, and white colors of the rocks provide spectacular views for park visitors. Bryce Canyon National Park is much smaller, and sits at a much higher elevation than nearby Zion National Park. The rim at Bryce varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet (2,400 to 2,700 m). The Bryce Canyon area was settled by Mormon pioneers in the 1850s and was named after Ebenezer Bryce, who homesteaded in the area in 1874. The area around Bryce Canyon was originally designated as a national monument by President Warren G. Harding in 1923 and was redesignated as a national park by Congress in 1928. The park covers 35,835 acres (55.992 sq mi; 14,502 ha; 145.02 km2) and receives substantially fewer visitors than Zion National Park (nearly 4.3 million in 2016) or Grand Canyon National Park (nearly 6 million in 2016), largely due to Bryce's more remote location. In 2016, Bryce Canyon received 2,365,110 recreational visitors, representing an increase of 35% from the prior year.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Natural Bridges National Monument
 
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Natural Bridges National Monument is a U.S. National Monument located about 50 miles northwest of the Four Corners boundary of southeast Utah, in the western United States, at the junction of White Canyon and Armstrong Canyon, part of the Colorado River drainage. It features the thirteenth largest natural bridge in the world, carved from the white Permian sandstone of the Cedar Mesa Formation that gives White Canyon its name. The three bridges in the park are named Kachina, Owachomo, and Sipapu, which are all Hopi names. A natural bridge is formed through erosion by water flowing in the stream bed of the canyon. During periods of flash floods, particularly, the stream undercuts the walls of rock that separate the meanders of the stream, until the rock wall within the meander is undercut and the meander is cut off; the new stream bed then flows underneath the bridge. Eventually, as erosion and gravity enlarge the bridge's opening, the bridge collapses under its own weight. There is evidence of at least two collapsed natural bridges within the Monument. In 1904, the National Geographic Magazine publicized the bridges and the area was designated a National Monument April 16, 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt. It is Utah's first National Monument. The Monument was nearly inaccessible for many decades, as reflected by the visitor log kept by the Monument's superintendents. The park received little visitation until after the uranium boom of the 1950s, which resulted in the creation of new roads in the area, including modern day Utah State Route 95, which was paved in 1976. The bridges and other features present on the Colorado Plateau today were molded by the processes of erosion. The destructive forces of wind and rain, running water, and freezing temperatures attacked the uplifts as soon as all the tectonic havoc started in the Late Cretaceous. The Colorado Plateau has been uplifted about 12,000 feet since the end of the Cretaceous about 66 million years ago. Some of this uplift occurred geologically rapidly. As the rate of uplift increased, so did the rate of erosion. The Colorado River, for example, carved its present course within the last 6 million years. With uplift, streams throughout the Colorado Plateau began to dissect the topography into the landscape we see today with unprecedented vigor, carving the rocks and carrying way the dismantled strata into the landscape we see today. The Monument's elevation ranges up to 6,500 feet. The Monument's vegetation is predominantly pinyon-juniper forest, with grass and shrubs typical of high-elevation Utah desert. In the canyons, where there is more water and seasonal streams, riparian desert plants, such as willow, oak and cottonwood trees, thrive. Because the Monument has been closed to grazing for nearly a century, and off-road motorized travel is restricted, Natural Bridges contains extensive areas of undisturbed, mature cryptobiotic soils. Potential bridge collapse is possible at Natural Bridges National Monument, especially along the span of Owachomo Bridge in Armstrong Canyon which is only 9 feet thick at the crest of its span. Earthquake potential is high along the Moab Fault in nearby Arches National Park, Southeast Utah Group. While this and other faults in the Paradox Basin are associated with salt structures, the Colorado Plateau interior does possess a low level of seismic hazard. Ground shaking from earthquakes may impact the bridges at Natural Bridges National Monument causing catastrophic failure of one or more of the bridges. Video Empire produces videos read aloud. Use the information in this video at your own risk. We cannot always guarantee accuracy. This video uses material from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_Bridges_National_Monument, licensed with CC Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0. This video is licensed with CC Attribution-Share-Alike 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/ In order to adapt this content it is required to comply with the license terms. Image licensing information is available via: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_Bridges_National_Monument
Views: 19 Video Empress