Home
Search results “Cryptographic hash function explained variation”
Cryptographic Hash Functions - CompTIA Security+ SY0-401: 6.2
 
07:04
Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0401 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/sy0401cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - There are many hash functions for many different circumstances. In this video, you’ll learn about MD5, SHA, RIPEMD, and HMAC hash functions. - - - - - Download entire video course: http://professormesser.link/401adyt Get the course on MP3 audio: http://professormesser.link/401vdyt Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 42647 Professor Messer
How secure is 256 bit security?
 
05:06
Supplement to the cryptocurrency video: How hard is it to find a 256-bit hash just by guessing and checking? What kind of computer would that take? Cryptocurrency video: https://youtu.be/bBC-nXj3Ng4 Home page: https://www.3blue1brown.com/ Several people have commented about how 2^256 would be the maximum number of attempts, not the average. This depends on the thing being attempted. If it's guessing a private key, you are correct, but for something like guessing which input to a hash function gives the desired output (as in bitcoin mining, for example), which is the kind of thing I had in mind here, 2^256 would indeed be the average number of attempts needed, at least for a true cryptographic hash function. Think of rolling a die until you get a 6, how many rolls do you need to make, on average? Music by Vince Rubinetti: https://vincerubinetti.bandcamp.com/album/the-music-of-3blue1brown ------------------ 3blue1brown is a channel about animating math, in all senses of the word animate. And you know the drill with YouTube, if you want to stay posted on new videos, subscribe, and click the bell to receive notifications (if you're into that). If you are new to this channel and want to see more, a good place to start is this playlist: http://3b1b.co/recommended Various social media stuffs: Website: https://www.3blue1brown.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/3Blue1Brown Patreon: https://patreon.com/3blue1brown Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/3blue1brown Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/3Blue1Brown
Views: 1123001 3Blue1Brown
Hashing Algorithms - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.2
 
03:36
Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - There are many methods and implementations of cryptographic hashing. In this video, you’ll learn about some of the most popular hashing algorithms. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 19691 Professor Messer
symmetric key cryptography
 
02:57
https://8gwifi.org/CipherFunctions.jsp Reference book: http://leanpub.com/crypto Cryptographic Algorithms generally fall into one of two different categories, or are a combination of both. Symmetric Fast Only provide confidentiality Examples: DES, AES, Blowfish, RC4, RC5 Asymmetric Large mathematical operations make it slower than symmetric algorithms No need for out of band key distribution (public keys are public!) Scales better since only a single key pair needed per individual Can provide authentication and nonrepudiation Examples: RSA, El Gamal, ECC, Diffie-Hellman problem with symmetric key cryptography DES (Data Encryption Standard) 64 bit key that is effectively 56 bits in strength Actual algorithm is called DEA (Data Encryption Algorithm) DES Modes Electronic Code Book Cipher Block Chaining (most commonly used for general purpose encryption) Cipher Feedback Output Feedback Counter Mode (used in IPSec) 3DES 112-bit effective key length Uses either 2 or 3 different smaller keys in one of several modes Modes EEE2/3 EDE2/3 AES NIST replaced DES in 1997 with this Uses the Rijndael algorithm Supports key/block sizes of 128, 192, and 256 bits Uses 10/12/14 rounds as block size increases IDEA (International Data Encryption Algorithm) Operates on 64 bit blocks in 8 rounds with 128 bit key Considered stronger than DES and is used in PGP Blowfish 64 bit block cipher with up to 448 bit key and 16 rounds Designed by Bruce Schneier RC4 Stream cipher with variable key size created by Ron Rivest RC5 Another Rivest cipher Block cipher with 32/64/128 bit blocks and keys up to 2048 bits RC6 Beefier version of RC5 submitted as AES candidate CAST 64 bit block cipher with keys between 40-128 bits with 12-16 rounds depending on key length CAST-256 used 128-bit blocks and keys from 128-256 bits using 48 rounds SAFER (Secure and Fast Encryption Routine) Set of patent-free algorithms in 64 and 128 bit block variants Variation used in Bluetooth Twofish Adapted version of Blowfish with 128 bit blocks, 128-256 bit keys and 16 rounds AES Finalist Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel symmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography tutorial symmetric key cryptography example symmetric key cryptography vs asymmetric key cryptography symmetric and asymmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie symmetrische und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel
Views: 42924 Zariga Tongy
On the Preimage Resistance of SHA-1
 
35:33
We show that preimages of SHA-1 can be computed at the cost of 2^159.3 compression function computations. For variants with a reduced number of steps we obtain significantly faster attacks than previously known. The best previous attack was on 48 (of 80) steps with a complexity of 2^159.3. Our attack on this variant has complexity 2^152.1. The new results heavily rely on the linear message expansion and the low diffusion of the step transformation. The techniques in this paper apply to any hash function with linear message expansion. In the talk we will provide a general introduction to meet-in-the-middle preimage attacks on hash functions.
Views: 336 Microsoft Research
Excel - Encryption using Excel      ( Great Trick )
 
11:18
Many more great Excel tutorials linked below: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8004DC1D703D348C&feature=plcp Be sure to watch my other Excel tutorial videos on my channel, including more advanced techniques and many useful and practical ones. Be sure to Subscribe and Comment.
Views: 33391 Jalayer Academy
MurmurHash
 
04:02
MurmurHash is a non-cryptographic hash function suitable for general hash-based lookup. It was created by Austin Appleby in 2008, and exists in a number of variants, all of which have been released into the public domain. The name comes from two basic operations, multiply and rotate, though the algorithm actually uses shift and xor instead of rotate. Unlike cryptographic hash functions, it is not specifically designed to be difficult to reverse by an adversary, making it unsuitable for cryptographic purposes. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1325 Audiopedia
Hashing Searching Sketching.
 
01:02:03
Google Tech Talks November 20, 2006 ABSTRACT We will see improved results on search using hashing and sketching. Hashing is often analyzed as balls being thrown into bins where you think of the hash items as balls and buckets as bins. By studying variants of the balls and bins processes we obtain a hashing algorithm with 85% hash table space utilization. We will also study locality sensitive hashing, a hashing method used for nearest neighbor search, as opposed to exact search. A locality sensitive hash function is likely to map nearby elements to the same bucket. We will see a variant of locality sensitive hashing that finds an approximate nearest neighbor in high dimensions using linear space. We...
Views: 13989 GoogleTechTalks
What is CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE? What does CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE mean? CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE meaning
 
04:52
What is CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE? What does CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE mean? CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE meaning - CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE definition - CRYPTOGRAPHIC NONCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In cryptography, a nonce is an arbitrary number that may only be used once. It is similar in spirit to a nonce word, hence the name. It is often a random or pseudo-random number issued in an authentication protocol to ensure that old communications cannot be reused in replay attacks. They can also be useful as initialization vectors and in cryptographic hash function. A nonce is an arbitrary number used only once in a cryptographic communication, in the spirit of a nonce word. They are often random or pseudo-random numbers. Many nonces also include a timestamp to ensure exact timeliness, though this requires clock synchronization between organizations. The addition of a client nonce ("cnonce") helps to improve the security in some ways as implemented in digest access authentication. To ensure that a nonce is used only once, it should be time-variant (including a suitably fine-grained timestamp in its value), or generated with enough random bits to ensure a probabilistically insignificant chance of repeating a previously generated value. Some authors define pseudo-randomness (or unpredictability) as a requirement for a nonce. Authentication protocols may use nonces to ensure that old communications cannot be reused in replay attacks. For instance, nonces are used in HTTP digest access authentication to calculate an MD5 digest of the password. The nonces are different each time the 401 authentication challenge response code is presented, thus making replay attacks virtually impossible. The scenario of ordering products over the Internet can provide an example of the usefulness of nonces in replay attacks. An attacker could take the encrypted information and—without needing to decrypt—could continue to send a particular order to the supplier, thereby ordering products over and over again under the same name and purchase information. The nonce is used to give 'originality' to a given message so that if the company receives any other orders from the same person with the same nonce, it will discard those as invalid orders. A nonce may be used to ensure security for a stream cipher. Where the same key is used for more than one message and then a different nonce is used to ensure that the keystream is different for different messages encrypted with that key; often the message number is used. Secret nonce values are used by the Lamport signature scheme as a signer-side secret which can be selectively revealed for comparison to public hashes for signature creation and verification. Initialization vectors may be referred to as nonces, as they are typically random or pseudo-random. Nonces are used in proof-of-work systems to vary the input to a cryptographic hash function so as to obtain a hash for a certain input that fulfills certain arbitrary conditions. In doing so, it becomes far more difficult to create a "desirable" hash than to verify it, shifting the burden of work onto one side of a transaction or system. For example, proof of work, using hash functions, was considered as a means to combat email spam by forcing email senders to find a hash value for the email (which included a timestamp to prevent pre-computation of useful hashes for later use) that had an arbitrary number of leading zeroes, by hashing the same input with a large number of nonce values until a "desirable" hash was obtained. Similarly, the bitcoin block-chain hashing algorithm can be tuned to an arbitrary difficulty by changing the required minimum/maximum value of the hash so that the number of bitcoins awarded for new blocks does not increase linearly with increased network computation power as new users join. This is likewise achieved by forcing bitcoin miners to add nonce values to the value being hashed to change the hash algorithm output. Because cryptographic hash algorithms cannot easily be predicted based on their inputs, this makes the act of blockchain hashing and the possibility of being awarded bitcoins something of a lottery, where the first "miner" to find a nonce that delivers a desirable hash is awarded valuable bitcoins.
Views: 7354 The Audiopedia
Lecture - 32 Basic Cryptographic Concepts Part : I
 
59:56
Lecture Series on Internet Technologies by Prof.I.Sengupta, Department of Computer Science & Engineering ,IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 104541 nptelhrd
Applied Cryptography: The RSA Digital Signature - Part 1
 
13:14
This video gives an overview of the RSA Digital Signature. It shows how this scheme is closely related to RSA encryption/decryption.
Views: 8969 Leandro Junes
Clustering Algorithms for Perceptual Image Hashing
 
51:07
A perceptual image hash function maps an image to a short binary string based on an image's appearance to the human eye. Perceptual hashing is useful in image databases, watermarking, and content authentication in adversarial scenarios. In this talk, we decouple image hashing into feature extraction (intermediate hash) followed by data clustering (final hash). We prove that the decision version of our clustering problem is NP complete. Then, for any perceptually significant feature extractor, we present a polynomial-time clustering algorithm based on a greedy heuristic, which automatically determines the final hash length needed to satisfy a specified distortion. Based on the proposed algorithm, we develop two variations to facilitate perceptual robustness vs. fragility trade-offs. We validate the perceptual significance of our hash by testing under Stirmark attacks. Finally, we develop randomized clustering algorithms for the purposes of secure image hashing. We demonstrate the hardness of generating malicious inputs by means of experimental results.
Views: 700 Microsoft Research
Our password hashing has no clothes
 
05:24
Many of us rely on the use of salt in the belief it will make our passwords "secure" when hashed with a variant of the SHA algorithm. Unfortunately, processing power has progress to the point where even salted hashes are now near useless, particularly when using a GPU in an attempt to crack them. This video shows how salted SHA1 hashes generated by the ASP.NET membership provider can easily be broken using hashcat and an AMD Radeon 7970 GPU. This video is part of a larger blog post which includes info on alternatives here: http://www.troyhunt.com/2012/06/our-password-hashing-has-no-clothes.html
Views: 15125 Troy Hunt
1. Signatures, Hashing, Hash Chains, e-cash, and Motivation
 
01:06:38
MIT MAS.S62 Cryptocurrency Engineering and Design, Spring 2018 Instructor: Neha Narula, Tadge Dryja View the complete course: https://ocw.mit.edu/MAS-S62S18 YouTube Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP61KHzhg3JIJdK08JLSlcLId Introduces currency, banking, and electronic cash. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at https://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at https://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 9002 MIT OpenCourseWare
Onion Routing - Applied Cryptography
 
01:52
This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 7333 Udacity
Side Channel Analysis of Cryptographic Implementations
 
48:21
Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 6107 nptelhrd
Zero Knowledge Proof - ZKP
 
10:18
Protecting your online privacy could become a lot easier with Zero Knowledge Proof. A technique that allows you to prove things without disclosing what it is you're proving. Need to have a certain age before you can signup for a service? You can deliver a proof that you meet the criteria without sharing your actual age. Or you could prove to your bank that your salary is sufficient to get a loan, without revealing your real salary. 📚 Sources https://savjee.be/videos/simply-explained/zero-knowledge-proof/ 🌍 Social Twitter: https://twitter.com/savjee Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/savjee ✏️ Check out my blog https://www.savjee.be
Cryptography, Cryptographic Security Controls & Cryptography Security Techniques Explained
 
16:57
Thanks For Watching This Video, I Hope You Must Have Liked It. If yes then please hit the subscribe button as I will be uploading a lot of IT security related training videos on this channel and if you will be my subscriber then you my friend will be the first one who will be notified about all my new videos my friend. If you have any questions for the topic that I have discussed in this video then please feel free to comment my friend and I will be happy to respond back to your queries... Please note that - all ISO 27001 documents and standards are completely owned intellectual property & copyright of ISO. So in case if by any chance you are interested to study more about the standard that I have discussed here then please go to the official ISO website in order to purchase the standards. This channel is only created to generate awareness and best practices for Information Security in general and if by any chance you wish to implement any of the standards that I have discussed here then you have to first purchase them from official ISO website. This channel is only created to help anyone who is currently studying or planning to study about ISMS Information Security Management System ISO 27001 Implementation. I want to make my contribution in the information security community.This channel is only created to generate awareness and best practices for Information Security in general. Disclaimer: Since ISO 27001 is a very vast topic and the implementation varies for all organization's so I can't ever call myself an "expert" in this field, all the knowledge and information that I am sharing here is only based upon my past experience in information security field and may not be directly applicable within your organization as such. So please use your judgement before implementing anything based upon my suggestions. I request you not to rely on anything that I say here, I do my best to be as accurate and as complete information that I can provide you “but” only the published standards are definitive. Only the published ISO standards stand above any information that I have shared in any of my videos. Thanks, Your IT Security Friend Luv Johar Website : http://aajkatech.com/ iso 27001 explained, iso 27001 awareness trainings, iso 27001 free trainings online, Iso 27001 free tutorials, ISO 27001 training material free, lead auditor free training course, lead implementer free training course, ISMS training free, information security management system training free,
Elliptic Curve Cryptography & Diffie-Hellman
 
12:11
Today we're going over Elliptic Curve Cryptography, particularly as it pertains to the Diffie-Hellman protocol. The ECC Digital Signing Algorithm was also discussed in a separate video concerning Bitcoin's cryptography.
Views: 56852 CSBreakdown
CERIAS Seminar: Security Applications for Physically Unclonable Functions
 
53:50
Speaker: Michael Kirkpatrick · Purdue University Abstract Physically unclonable functions (PUFs) are hardware structures that create unique characteristics for distinct copies of a device. Specifically, the physical nature of manufacturing a device introduces slight variations that can be neither controlled nor predicted. PUFs quantify these differences into a random one-way function. In our work, we have explored multiple application scenarios for integrating PUFs into security systems. In the first application, we propose leveraging PUFs to bind access requests to known, trusted devices. This scheme also offers a lightweight key exchange protocol that can reduce the computational cost for low-power embedded devices. In our second work, we have designed PEAR, a portable authentication token based on PUFs that allows for privacy-preserving transactions with websites. Finally, we have created PUF ROKs, which are read-once cryptographic keys based on PUFs. In this talk, we will introduce these applications, highlighting the advantages of deploying PUFs over competing technologies, as well as presenting the results of our empirical and formal analyses of these prototypes. About the Speaker Michael S. Kirkpatrick is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Computer Sciences at Purdue University. His research interests lie in the realm of designing secure systems, with a special focus on the interactions between hardware, architectures, and operating systems. He received a M.S. in Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University in 2007 and a B.A. in Mathematics and Computer Science at Indiana University in 2001. In addition, he spent more than five years with IBM, primarily working in the area of semiconductor engineering and lithography. For more information and source of the videos visit: http://bit.ly/CERIAS_archive
Views: 3029 Christiaan008
What is ENCRYPTED KEY EXCHANGE? What does ENCRYPTED KEY EXCHANGE mean?
 
02:11
What is ENCRYPTED KEY EXCHANGE? What does ENCRYPTED KEY EXCHANGE mean? ENCRYPTED KEY EXCHANGE meaning - ENCRYPTED KEY EXCHANGE definition - ENCRYPTED KEY EXCHANGE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Encrypted Key Exchange (also known as EKE) is a family of password-authenticated key agreement methods described by Steven M. Bellovin and Michael Merritt. Although several of the forms of EKE in this paper were later found to be flawed , the surviving, refined, and enhanced forms of EKE effectively make this the first method to amplify a shared password into a shared key, where the shared key may subsequently be used to provide a zero-knowledge password proof or other functions. In the most general form of EKE, at least one party encrypts an ephemeral (one-time) public key using a password, and sends it to a second party, who decrypts it and uses it to negotiate a shared key with the first party. A second paper describes Augmented-EKE, and introduced the concept of augmented password-authenticated key agreement for client/server scenarios. Augmented methods have the added goal of ensuring that password verification data stolen from a server cannot be used by an attacker to masquerade as the client, unless the attacker first determines the password (e.g. by performing a brute force attack on the stolen data). A version of EKE based on Diffie-Hellman, known as DH-EKE, has survived attack and has led to improved variations, such as the PAK family of methods in IEEE P1363.2. With the US patent on EKE expiring in late 2011, an EAP authentication method using EKE was published as an IETF RFC. The EAP method uses the Diffie-Hellman variant of EKE.
Views: 303 The Audiopedia
Topic 05 A Indicator Random Variables
 
17:35
Topic 05 A: Indicator Random Variables (as part of Probabilistic Analysis) Lecture by Dan Suthers for University of Hawaii Information and Computer Sciences course 311 on Algorithms. (Inverted course: lectures are online and problem solving in class.) Based on Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest and Clifford Stein, Introduction to Algorithms, Third Edition, The MIT Press, 2009.
Views: 10377 UHMICSAlgorithms
Hashing Lab
 
25:37
Lab: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/40355863/csn11117_lab03.pdf
Views: 504 Bill Buchanan OBE
Codecrypt
 
03:56
Codecrypt The post-quantum cryptography tool. https://github.com/exaexa/codecrypt * About This is a GnuPG-like unix program for encryption and signing that uses only quantum-computer-resistant algorithms: McEliece cryptosystem (compact QC-MDPC variant) for encryption Hash-based Merkle tree algorithm (FMTSeq variant) for digital signatures Codecrypt is free software.
Views: 200 Sys 64738
Symmetric Algorithms - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.2
 
04:45
Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - Symmetric ciphers are some of the most commonly used encryption methods on the Internet. In this video, you’ll learn about DES, 3DES, RC4, AES, Blowfish, and Twofish. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 21723 Professor Messer
What is RANDOMIZATION FUNCTION? What does RANDOMIZATION FUNCTION mean?
 
03:39
What is RANDOMIZATION FUNCTION? What does RANDOMIZATION FUNCTION mean? RANDOMIZATION FUNCTION meaning - RANDOMIZATION FUNCTION definition - RANDOMIZATION FUNCTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In computer science, a randomization function or randomizing function is an algorithm or procedure that implements a randomly chosen function between two specific sets, suitable for use in a randomized algorithm. Randomizing functions are related to random number generators and hash functions, but have somewhat different requirements and uses, and often need specific algorithms. Randomizing functions are used to turn algorithms that have good expected performance for random inputs, into algorithms that have the same performance for any input. For example, consider a sorting algorithm like quicksort, which has small expected running time when the input items are presented in random order, but is very slow when they are presented in certain unfavorable orders. A randomizing function from the integers 1 to n to the integers 1 to n can be used to rerrange the n input items in "random" order, before calling that algorithm. This modified (randomized) algorithm will have small expected running time, whatever the input order. In theory, randomization functions are assumed to be truly random, and yield an unpredictably different function every time the algorithm is executed. The randomization technique would not work if, at every execution of the algorithm, the randomization function always performed the same mapping, or a mapping entirely determined by some externally observable parameter (such as the program's startup time). With such a "pseudo-randomization" function, one could in principle construct a sequence of calls such that the function would always yield a "bad" case for the underlying deterministic algorithm. For that sequence of calls, the average cost would be closer to the worst-case cost, rather than the average cost for random inputs. In practice, however, the main concern is that some "bad" cases for the deterministic algorithm may occur in practice much more often than it would be predicted by chance. For example, in a naive variant of quicksort, the worst case is when the input items are already sorted — which is a very common occurrence in many applications. For such algorithms, even a fixed pseudo-random permutation may be good enough. Even though the resulting "pseudo-randomized" algorithm would still have as many "bad" cases as the original, they will be certain peculiar orders that would be quite unlikely to arise in real applications. So, in practice one often uses randomization functions that are derived from pseudo-random number generators, preferably seeded with external "random" data such as the program's startup time. The uniformity requirements for a randomizing function are usually much weaker than those of hash functions and pseudo-random generators. The minimum requirement is that it maps any input of the deterministic algorithm into a "good" input with a sufficiently high probability. (However, analysis is usually simpler if the randomizing function implements each possible mapping with uniform probability.)
Views: 171 The Audiopedia
The Golden Key: FBI vs Apple iPhone - Computerphile
 
08:00
Should Apple unlock a terrorists iPhone for the FBI? Professor Ross Anderson explains how this is a "Pandora's Box" situation. Buffer Overflow Attacks: https://youtu.be/1S0aBV-Waeo $5 Computer: https://youtu.be/WR0ghM3U0M4 AI Safety: https://youtu.be/IB1OvoCNnWY EXTRA BITS: https://youtu.be/6iGxNku7ilw http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com
Views: 280816 Computerphile
Cryptography and Network Security
 
02:31
*****Cryptography and Network Security: https://ict.iitk.ac.in/product/cryptography-and-network-security/ ***** This E & ICT Academy, IIT Kanpur "Cryptography and Network Security Tutorial” video will get an overview of modern cryptography along with an introduction to number theory. After that, you will learn about probability and information theory, classical cryptosystems, cryptanalysis of classical ciphers. Below is the list of topics covered in this session: 1. Introduction 2. Overview of Modern Cryptography 3. Introduction to Number Theory 4. Probability and Information Theory 5. Classical Cryptosystems 6. Cryptanalysis of Classical Ciphers 7. Shannons Theory 8. Shannons Theory (Contd...1) 9. Shannons Theory (Contd...2) 10. Symmetric Key Ciphers 11. Block Cipher Standards (DES) 12. Block Cipher Standards (AES) 13. Block Cipher Standards (AES) (Contd.) 14. Linear Cryptanalysis 15. Differential Cryptanalysis 16. Few other Cryptanalytic Techniques 17. Overview of S-Box Design Principles 18. Modes of Operation of Block Ciphers 19. Stream Ciphers 20. Stream Ciphers (Contd...1) 21. Stream Ciphers (Contd...2) 22. Pseudorandomness 23. Cryptographic Hash Functions 24. Cryptographic Hash Functions (Contd...1) 25. Cryptographic Hash Functions (Contd...2) Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ICTAcademyIITK/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ICTAcademyIITK Website: https://ict.iitk.ac.in/ ----------------------------------------------------------------- How it Works? 1. 24X7 Access: You can view lectures as per their own convenience. 2. Online lectures: 22 hours of video lectures are available in the course, with high-quality videos which can be viewed online. 3. Updated Quality content: The course content is latest, easy to follow, and in accordance with the current industry demands. -------------------------------------------------------------------- About the Course: Prof. Debdeep Mukhopadhyay, a faculty from the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the IIT Kharagpur has designed this course on Cryptography and Network Security covering all the fundamental concepts of Cryptography and Network Security. In this course, you will be introduced to the areas of cryptography and cryptanalysis. You will get an overview of modern cryptography along with an introduction to number theory. After that, you will learn about probability and information theory, classical cryptosystems, cryptanalysis of classical ciphers. Then you will learn about Shannon's theory followed by symmetric key ciphers, block ciphers standards, linear and differential cryptanalysis, stream ciphers, cryptographic hash functions and a lot more. This is completely an online course, and you can access it from anywhere in the world. So, this makes it all together a complete package. During this Cryptography and Network Security Online training, you'll learn: 1. After learning the course on cryptography and network security, you will get well versed with fundamentals principles of cryptography and network security. 2. You will be able to create take advanced courses on cybersecurity and network security and effectively implement them practically. 3. Learning the principles of Cryptography and Network Security will help you to crack job interviews in this field, you will be on demand due to less availability of the Network security professionals. 4. You will be awarded a certificate from E & ICT Academy, IIT Kanpur. You can add that in your curriculum vitae. Course Objectives On completion of the Cryptography and Network Security Certification training, a learner will be able to: 1. Students: Students: All students who are pursuing any technical/professional courses, and looking for a career in Network/Cyber Security, can take this course. 2. Teachers/Faculties: All teachers/faculties who want to learn the fundamental concepts and principles of Cryptography and Network Security, and interested in delivering their knowledge and learning to their students, can take this course. The certificate will be another feather in their hat. 3. Professionals: All working professionals, who want to enhance their skills in Network/Cyber Security domain, can take this course. Who should go for this course? The demand across all industries for increased computer security is growing, and cryptography is a subcategory within the career field of information security. Cryptologists are in demand in the military forces, government agencies, technology companies, banking and financial organization s, law enforcement agencies, universities and research institutes. Depending on the profile of the organization one is involved with, the area of functioning varies. So it is worth having a go at it. Please write back to us at [email protected] or chat with us online-https://ict.iitk.ac.in/ for more information.
Bitcoin - Digital Signatures
 
09:47
A high-level explanation of digital signature schemes, which are a fundamental building block in many cryptographic protocols. More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=Aq3a-_O2NcI Video by Zulfikar Ramzan. Zulfikar Ramzan is a world-leading expert in computer security and cryptography and is currently the Chief Scientist at Sourcefire. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from MIT.
Views: 142841 Khan Academy
hashing for beginners
 
02:02
an introduction to the shenanigans of the hash house harriers. these are some of the marks seen on trails in the Greater Toronto Area...folks hash all over the world and there are variations. events for the Toronto area chapters can be found at http://www.hogtownh3.com
Views: 671 NattyPorn
Different Cryptographic Controls For Ensuring CIA Explained ISO 27001 Training
 
01:56
Thanks For Watching This Video, I Hope You Must Have Liked It. If yes then please hit the subscribe button as I will be uploading a lot of IT security related training videos on this channel and if you will be my subscriber then you my friend will be the first one who will be notified about all my new videos my friend. If you have any questions for the topic that I have discussed in this video then please feel free to comment my friend and I will be happy to respond back to your queries... Please note that - all ISO 27001 documents and standards are completely owned intellectual property & copyright of ISO. So in case if by any chance you are interested to study more about the standard that I have discussed here then please go to the official ISO website in order to purchase the standards. This channel is only created to generate awareness and best practices for Information Security in general and if by any chance you wish to implement any of the standards that I have discussed here then you have to first purchase them from official ISO website. This channel is only created to help anyone who is currently studying or planning to study about ISMS Information Security Management System ISO 27001 Implementation. I want to make my contribution in the information security community.This channel is only created to generate awareness and best practices for Information Security in general. Disclaimer: Since ISO 27001 is a very vast topic and the implementation varies for all organization's so I can't ever call myself an "expert" in this field, all the knowledge and information that I am sharing here is only based upon my past experience in information security field and may not be directly applicable within your organization as such. So please use your judgement before implementing anything based upon my suggestions. I request you not to rely on anything that I say here, I do my best to be as accurate and as complete information that I can provide you “but” only the published standards are definitive. Only the published ISO standards stand above any information that I have shared in any of my videos. Thanks, Your IT Security Friend Luv Johar Website : http://aajkatech.com/ iso 27001 explained, iso 27001 awareness trainings, iso 27001 free trainings online, Iso 27001 free tutorials, ISO 27001 training material free, lead auditor free training course, lead implementer free training course, ISMS training free, information security management system training free,
Ssh Authentication In Practice - Applied Cryptography
 
02:33
This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 817 Udacity
10-801 Lecture 8: Simhash Example, Minwise Hash Properties
 
01:19:49
Advanced Optimization and Randomized Methods (PhD Level) Lecturer: Prof. Alex Smola Date: 2/10/2014
Views: 928 10-801-s14-cmu
Testing Hash Functions - CS101 - Udacity
 
02:50
Other units in this course below: Unit 1: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF6D042E98ED5C691 Unit 2: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6A1005157875332F Unit 3: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL62AE4EA617CF97D7 Unit 4: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL886F98D98288A232 Unit 5: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBA8DEB5640ECBBDD Unit 6: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6B5C5EC17F3404D6 Unit 7: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6511E7098EC577BE Q&A: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDA5F9F71AFF4B69E To gain access to interactive quizzes, homework, programming assignments and a helpful community, join the class at http://www.udacity.com
Views: 882 Udacity
Just How do Macs and PCs Differ? - Computerphile
 
06:55
Following on from our contentious 'Mac or PC' film, we asked Professor Tom Rodden just what the actual difference is between Mac and PC. (by PC we are referring to machines running Windows or a variant of Linux) Floating Point Numbers: http://youtu.be/PZRI1IfStY0 Mac or PC? : http://youtu.be/A_Zptl34hbo Heartbleed, Running the Code: http://youtu.be/1dOCHwf8zVQ http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. See the full list of Brady's video projects at: http://bit.ly/bradychannels
Views: 902272 Computerphile
Pseudorandom Functions and Lattices.
 
16:35
Talk at eurocrypt 2012. Authors: Abhishek Banerjee, Chris Peikert, Alon Rosen. See http://www.iacr.org/cryptodb/data/paper.php?pubkey=24252
Views: 617 TheIACR
The Mathematics of Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange | Infinite Series
 
13:33
Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/donateinfi Symmetric keys are essential to encrypting messages. How can two people share the same key without someone else getting a hold of it? Upfront asymmetric encryption is one way, but another is Diffie-Hellman key exchange. This is part 3 in our Cryptography 101 series. Check out the playlist here for parts 1 & 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOs34_-eREk&list=PLa6IE8XPP_gmVt-Q4ldHi56mYsBuOg2Qw Tweet at us! @pbsinfinite Facebook: facebook.com/pbsinfinite series Email us! pbsinfiniteseries [at] gmail [dot] com Previous Episode Topology vs. “a” Topology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdOaMOcxY7U&t=13s Symmetric single-key encryption schemes have become the workhorses of secure communication for a good reason. They’re fast and practically bulletproof… once two parties like Alice and Bob have a single shared key in hand. And that’s the challenge -- they can’t use symmetric key encryption to share the original symmetric key, so how do they get started? Written and Hosted by Gabe Perez-Giz Produced by Rusty Ward Graphics by Ray Lux Assistant Editing and Sound Design by Mike Petrow and Meah Denee Barrington Made by Kornhaber Brown (www.kornhaberbrown.com) Thanks to Matthew O'Connor, Yana Chernobilsky, and John Hoffman who are supporting us on Patreon at the Identity level! And thanks to Nicholas Rose, Jason Hise, Thomas Scheer, Marting Sergio H. Faester, CSS, and Mauricio Pacheco who are supporting us at the Lemma level!
Views: 54925 PBS Infinite Series
CERIAS Symposium 2017 - TechTalk - Jeremiah M. Blocki
 
27:25
Jeremiah M. Blocki Assistant Professor, Computer Science Purdue University “Memory Hard Functions and Password Hashings” In the last few years breaches at organizations like Yahoo!, Dropbox, Lastpass, AshleyMadison and Adult FriendFinder have exposed over a billion user passwords to offline attacks. Password hashing algorithms are a critical last line of defense against an offline attacker who has stolen password hash values from an authentication server. A attacker who has stolen a user’s password hash value can attempt to crack each user’s password offline by comparing the hashes of likely password guesses with the stolen hash value. A good password hashing algorithm should have the property that it is feasible to compute the function quickly (e.g., 0.5 seconds) on a personal computer, but it should be economically infeasible for an offline attacker to check millions (or billions) of password guesses. Memory hard functions (MHFs), first explicitly introduced by Percival, are a promising key-stretching tool for password hashing because the cost of storing/retrieving items from memory is relatively constant across different computer architectures. Thus, in contrast to standard cryptographic hash functions (e.g., SHA256) the cost of computing an MHF cannot be significantly reduced by developing customized hardware (ASICs). More specifically, we want to ensure that any circuit evaluating multiple instances of the MHF has high amortized AT-complexity --- Area X Time/#instances. Data-Independent Memory Hard Functions (iMHFs) are an important variant of MHFs due to their greater resistance to side-channel attacks. An iMHF can be specified by a directed acyclic G specifying data-dependencies during computation. Due to the recently completed Password Hashing Competition we have many candidate iMHFs, but many of these iMHFs had not been analyzed until recently. This talk will summarize recent results demonstrating that a combinatorial property called depth-robustness fully characterizes iMHFs with high amortized-AT complexity. We will also show that Argon2i, the winner of the password hashing competition, is defined using a directed acyclic graph G that is not depth-robust. The resulting attacks are practical for realistic settings of the Argon2i parameters. We will also discuss recent progress towards the development of a practical iMHF with provably high AT-complexity. https://www.cerias.purdue.edu/site/symposium2017 Disclaimer: https://www.cerias.purdue.edu/news_and_events/events/security_seminar/#disclaimer
Views: 65 ceriaspurdue
The Birthday Paradox
 
10:02
3.016 Final Video project. Simple derivation of the solution to the birthday paradox with variations and ideas for further study.
Views: 2951 Ian Chesser
Secure Web Browsing - Computerphile
 
12:20
Websites & https what difference does the "s" make anyway? - Dr Richard Mortier of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory explains. Follow the Cookie Trail: https://youtu.be/LHSSY8QNvew Man in the Middle / Superfish: https://youtu.be/-enHfpHMBo4 Botnets: COMING SOON Object Oriented Programming: https://youtu.be/KyTUN6_Z9TM 3D Rock Art Scanner: https://youtu.be/Ahdnkj77rAY Mixed Reality Continuum: https://youtu.be/V4qxfFPgqdc http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com
Views: 130629 Computerphile
Spreading the Hashpower Around: A Catch 22 Situation
 
13:15
51% attacks have been prevalent recently so it's no surprise that developers are asking miners to spread the hashpower around between pools. However, should GPU miners support smaller pools or go with larger pools that have less variance? This is the dilemma miners face. SafeCoin Mining Pools - https://safecoin.org/mining/ SafeCoin Blocks - https://explorer.safecoin.org/blocks Equipool - https://equipool.1ds.us/ MiningSpeed - https://pool.miningspeed.com/ NiceHash - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/nicehash Be sure to leave a comment below and give your opinion on this topic. Also, if you haven't already subscribed, please click the subscribe button so you stay up to date with my latest cryptocurrency videos. Kevin OBVIOUS DISCLAIMER IS OBVIOUS: I am not a financial advisor. My opinions are my own and it is the responsibility of everyone to do their own research for every coin they invest in. SafeCoin ------------- In June 2018 I joined the SafeCoin project https://safecoin.org/ Find out why at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qt6Hu356Kbo Buy Cryptocurrency -------------------------------- Exchange USD, GBP, EUR, and more, to Bitcoin and other popular Cryptocurrencies. CoinBase - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/coinbase Cryptocurrency Wallets -------------------------------------- Protect your cryptocurrency with hardware wallets. Ledger Nano S Amazon USA - https://amzn.to/2HHzxlm Amazon UK - https://amzn.to/2HY8tTj Trezor Amazon USA - https://amzn.to/2raFJMu Amazon UK - https://amzn.to/2FXs9k6 KeepKey Amazon USA - https://amzn.to/2JFWzto Amazon UK - https://amzn.to/2K0Amqs Buy HashPower --------------------------- Don't have a mining rig? Don't worry, you can purchase hashpower from others and use their equipment to mine the coins you want. NiceHash - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/nicehash Mining Rig Rentals - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/miningrigrentals Crypto Exchanges ------------------------------------------------- A Selection of exchanges I have used and trust. SafeTrade - https://safe.trade/ (Beta) Binance - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/binance LiveCoin - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/livecoin HitBTC - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/hitbtc Kukoin - https://www.kevinmuldoon.com/go/kucoin Nanex - https://nanex.co/ --- Connect With Me --- Website: https://www.kevinmuldoon.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/KevinMuldoon Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kevinmuldoondotcom Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KevinMuldoon/
What is CRYPTO CLOUD COMPUTING? What does CRYPTO CLOUD COMPUTING mean?
 
05:15
What is CRYPTO CLOUD COMPUTING? What does CRYPTO CLOUD COMPUTING mean? CRYPTO CLOUD COMPUTING meaning - CRYPTO CLOUD COMPUTING definition - CRYPTO CLOUD COMPUTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cloud computing is a combination of IaaS, PaaS, SaaS. To construct a secure cloud computing system, security at infrastructure, service platforms and application software levels have to be studied for a secure cloud computing system. Information encryption is one of effective means to achieve cloud computing information security. Traditionally, information encryption focuses on specified stages and operations, such as data encryption. For cloud computing, a system level design has to be implemented. Crypto cloud computing is a new secure cloud computing architecture. It can provide protection of information security at the system level, and allows users access to shared services conveniently and accurately. Crypto cloud computing protects individual’s connections with the outside world. It can protect the personal privacy without any delay of information exchange. Crypto cloud computing is based on the Quantum Direct Key system. Quantum Direct Key (QDK) is a set of advanced asymmetric offline key mechanism. In this mechanism, all entities get public and private key pair according to their ID. Each entity only holds its own private key, but has a public key generator to generate any public key. In this system, an entity can produce the public key of any other entities offline, no any third-party agency (such as CA) is necessary. Crypto cloud computing based on QDK can avoid network traffic congestion, and other drawbacks using current encryption system. In the crypto cloud computing system, each entity encrypts data using his/her own private key. All elements in the system such as cloud computing infrastructure units, platform, virtualization tools and all involved entities have their own keys. While fulfilling their own functions of information exchange and processing, all these elements will use the public key and private key to perform authentication first. What’s more, events occur in the cloud computing are also assigned a unique key. In this way, crypto cloud system guarantees the security and credibility of information exchange. Current cloud computing structure is developed for data and computing sharing. Security is not priority of system. On the contrary, encryption and security are inherently integrated in the crypto cloud computing based on the QDK. QDK authorized function units are bricks of crypto cloud computing. Besides primary function of data en/decryption, crypto cloud computing also provides many security related functions. For example, all channels sign transmit data using with their own keys, and the receiving terminals can avoid hijacking by verifying signature. What’s more, the exact position of security leakage can be identified determined by analyzing digital signatures of forged data. Based on such capabilities, crypto-related functions can be provided as services in cloud, which is named as ‘Crypto as a service (CAAS)’. Crypto cloud computing is not only the advances in information technology, but also innovation of logical relationship. In crypto cloud computing system, non-system data is not allowed to store and transmit. Private Key and offline public key, play a role of identification and certification in the process of information exchange. In this way, the cloud establishes a relationship of trust with a customer. Data identification depends on the logical relationship of mutual trust or need, and the logical relationship depends on the cloud customer. Crypto cloud computing is a new framework for cyber resource sharing. It protects data security and privacy. Well, in cloud environment, crypto cloud computing guarantees the information security and integrity during whole procedure. Security management of cloud computing can also be performed by authorizing the signatures of every element involved. What’s more, a user can retrieve all related resources using his QDK key. There is no personal privacy under the current cloud framework, as pointed out by Mark Zuckerberg, 'the Age of Privacy Is Over '.However, with the development of crypto cloud computing, we can resolve the conflict between services data sharing and privacy security. It opens up new prospects for the development of information sharing technology.
Views: 145 The Audiopedia
Sums On Fermets little theorems #DATA COMPRESSION AND ENCRYPTION#
 
12:26
https://chat.whatsapp.com/JCelI4vL5JPLCY3cufm7ri Please Give your feedback.... For any Queries ASHISH Contact:-8286798454
Views: 735 Ashish Gupta
IOTA tutorial 1: What is IOTA and some terminology explained
 
15:38
If you like this video and want to support me, go this page for my donation crypto addresses: https://www.youtube.com/c/mobilefish/about Update: In this video i mentioned Curl and the vulnerability found in this algorithm. However it seems that this is NOT correct. Please read: https://blog.iota.org/official-iota-foundation-response-to-the-digital-currency-initiative-at-the-mit-media-lab-part-1-72434583a2 This is part 1 of the IOTA tutorial. In this video series different topics will be explained which will help you to understand IOTA. It is recommended to watch each video sequentially as I may refer to certain IOTA topics explained earlier. IOTA is not an acronym for Internet of Things, (IoT) but it just mean something very small. David Sønstebø, Sergey Ivancheglo, Dominik Schiener and Serguei Popov founded IOTA in 2015. IOTA Foundation main focus is Internet of Things and the Machine Economy but this technology is well suited for payments between humans as well. The IOTA white paper can be found at: https://iota.org/IOTA_Whitepaper.pdf All IOTA's which will ever exist have already been created.  The total IOTA supply is: 2,779,530,283,277,761 IOTAs IOTA features - Scalability The network becomes stronger when the number of transactions increases. IOTA can achieve high transaction throughput. - Decentralisation IOTA has no miners. Every transaction maker is also a transaction validator which means every transaction maker actively participates in the consensus. - No transaction fees IOTA has no transaction fees which means IOTA can be used for micropayments. - Quantum computing protection Quantum computers will be able to crack current data encryption methods much faster than current classical computers. IOTA uses the Winternitz One-Time Signature Scheme which is a quantum-resistant algorithm. See: https://eprint.iacr.org/2011/191.pdf IOTA is the 3rd generation public permissionless distributed ledger, based on a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG). IOTA called this DAG the tangle. The tangle is NOT the same as the Blockchain. A tangle is a data structure based on Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG). Each transaction always validates 2 previous non validated transactions. Directed means the graph is pointing to one direction. Tips are the unconfirmed transactions in the tangle graph. Height is the length of the longest oriented path to the genesis. Depth is the length of the longest reverse-oriented path to some tip. Making a transaction is a 3 step process: - Signing: Your node (computer / mobile) creates a transaction and sign it with your private key. - Tip Selection: Your node chooses two other unconfirmed transactions (tips) using the Random Walk Monte Carlo (RWMC) algorithm. - Proof of Work: Your node checks if the two transactions are not conflicting. Next, the node must do some Proof of Work (PoW) by solving a cryptographic puzzle (hashcash). Hashcash works by repeatedly hashing the same data with a tiny variation until a hash is found with a certain number of leading zero bits. This PoW is to prevent spam and Sybil attacks. The goal of the Random Walk Monte Carlo algorithm is to generate fair samples from some difficult distribution. The Random Walk Monte Carlo (RWMC) algorithm is used in two ways: - To choose two other unconfirmed transactions (tips) when creating a transaction. - And to determine if a transaction is confirmed. To determine the confirmation level of your transaction we need the depth to start from and we execute the Random Walk Monte Carlo algorithm N times, the probability of your transaction being accepted is therefore M of N. M being the number of times you land on a tip that has a path to your transaction. If you execute RWMC 100 times, and 60 tips has a path to your transaction, than your transaction is 60% confirmed. It is up the the merchant to decide to accept the transaction and exchange goods. It is the same as Bitcoins where you want to wait for at least 6 blocks for high value transactions. Transactions with bigger depths takes longer to be validated. An IOTA Reference Implementation (IRI), wallet and libraries are available at: https://github.com/iotaledger To setup a full node you need to tether with neighbours by exchanging your ip address with theirs. Once you have sent a transaction from an address, you should never use this address again. A tangle can get branch off and back into the network. This is called partitioning. The Coordinator or ‘Coo’ for short, are several full nodes scattered across the world run by the IOTA Foundation. It creates zero value transactions called milestones which full nodes reference to. Check out all my other IOTA tutorial videos https://goo.gl/aNHf1y Subscribe to my YouTube channel: https://goo.gl/61NFzK The presentation used in this video tutorial can be found at: https://www.mobilefish.com/developer/iota/iota_quickguide_tutorial.html #mobilefish #howto #iota
Views: 38711 Mobilefish.com
ESSENTIALS: Subroutines & The Wheeler Jump - Computerphile
 
10:24
A true essential, the subroutine saves time, effort and helps avoid bugs. Dr Bagley explains why he has two essentials! Essentials: Hidden Pointers: https://youtu.be/knP_5e57biw AI YouTube Comments: https://youtu.be/XyMdpcAPnZc Sun Microsystems Server: https://youtu.be/c5qH-LW3tq8 Many thanks to Microsoft Research UK for their support with the 'Essentials' mini-series. http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com
Views: 49958 Computerphile
NSEC5: Provably Preventing DNSSEC Zone Enumeration
 
42:10
*To jump directly to the presentation of NSEC5, go to minute 16:30.* *For an updated view the NSEC5 project, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pWrij0YhGo* We propose NSEC5, a new cryptographic construction that solves the problem of DNSSEC zone enumeration while remaining faithful to the operational realities of DNSSEC. NSEC5 can be thought of as a variant of NSEC3 in which the unkeyed hash function is replaced with a deterministic RSA-based keyed hashing scheme. This a reprisal of a talk at the Fall 2014 DNS OARC workshop in Los Angeles. We start by walking through solutions that are currently used in DNSSEC (online signing, NSEC, and NSEC3), and explain why they are vulnerable to zone enumeration or attacks on integrity due to leaked cryptographic material. We then introduce NSEC5 and explain why it robust to these issues. Project page: http://www.cs.bu.edu/~goldbe/papers/nsec5.html NEW! (January 2016) We now have a version of NSEC5 based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography. See http://ia.cr/2016/083 For full details, see our paper: S. Goldberg, M. Naor, D. Papadopoulos, L. Reyzin, S. Vasant, A. Ziv, NSEC5: Provably Preventing DNSSEC Zone Enumeration. NDSS'15, San Deigo, CA, February 2015. Available at: http://eprint.iacr.org/2014/582.pdf
Views: 901 Sharon Goldberg
ERC20 tokens - Simply Explained
 
06:14
Not all cryptocurrencies have their own blockchains. Instead they run on top of other platforms like ERC20 tokens run on top of Ethereum. This video explains what these tokens are and why ERC20 was created. 📚 Sources Can be found on my website: https://www.savjee.be/videos/simply-explained/erc20-tokens/ 🌍 Social Twitter: https://twitter.com/savjee Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/savjee ✏️ Check out my blog https://www.savjee.be