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The Ediacaran Biota and the development of modern marine ecosystems
 
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The Ediacaran Biota and the development of modern marine ecosystems A Marine Life Talk at the National Oceanography Centre by Alex Liu Life in the modern oceans is abundant and diverse, but it hasn't always been that way. For almost three billion years following the initial evolution of life, the only inhabitants of the marine realm were microscopic, and largely microbial. Then, some 580 million years ago, large and complex organisms suddenly appear in the fossil record. Known as the Ediacaran Biota, these enigmatic and unusual life-forms, bearing little resemblance to any organisms seen before or since, seemingly dominated the planet for around 40 million years. This domination ended with the 'Cambrian Explosion' around 540 million years ago, when modern animal groups can first be recognised worldwide, and the Ediacaran organisms disappear from the record. Find out more at http://noc.ac.uk/news/marine-life-talk-%E2%80%93-6-december-2012
Views: 17884 NOC news
The chronicles of Charnia : morphology and morphogenesis in an iconic Ediacaran taxon
 
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By Recorded at the International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. With thanks to Memorial University of Newfoundland and The Geological Survey of Newfoundland and Labrador.
Views: 700 Palaeo cast
Laziness Causes Extinction & New Pterosaur  - 7 Days of Science
 
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This week, there's a lot of news, and we picked just the best for our quick weekly recap! There's a New Pterosaur, Japanese satellites trying to forecast space weather, and we found out that if you're too lazy, your species might just go extinct. Join our Discord server: https://discord.gg/3KgpG8J Music by M.Holloway: https://goo.gl/9wX4ht Subscribe to explore the wonderful life around you! Social Media: ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BenGThomas42 ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bengthomas42/ ►Instagram: http://bit.ly/1PIEagv ►Google+: http://bit.ly/1ObHejE New pterosaur: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-45171201 https://svpow.com/2018/08/13/caelestiventus-hanseni-the-new-triassic-pterosaur-from-utah/amp/?__twitter_impression=true New lobopodian (ancient ‘worm’): https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180808134228.htm http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/5/8/172101 Space weather forecasts: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180809093424.htm Lazy Homo erectus: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180810091542.htm Ediacaran biota: https://www.paleowire.com/just-out-cambrian-petalonamid-stromatoveris-phylogenetically-links-ediacaran-biota-to-later-animals-palaeontology/ https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/pala.12393 Elephant Zombie genes: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180814173643.htm Palm Oil is still bad: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-45146581
Views: 17141 Ben G Thomas
The Ediacaran-Cambrian rise of biomineralisation: triggers, patterns and process
 
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By Wood, R.*, Zhuravlev, A., Zhu, M., and Ivantsov, A. Recorded at the International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. With thanks to Memorial University of Newfoundland and The Geological Survey of Newfoundland and Labrador.
Views: 369 Palaeo cast
280 million-year-old fossil reveals origins of chimaeras
 
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Chimaeras are difficult to place on the tree of life because they're so weird--they're most closely related to sharks, but they also have features of other fishes and even four-legged creatures like mammals. Now, the discovery of a 280-million-year-old fossil from South Africa reveals the evolutionary history of these strange creatures, and sheds light on their early development as they diverged from their deep, shared ancestry with sharks. Learn more At Forefront of Medicine: Website: http://www.uchicagomedicine.org Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/uchicagomed Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/uchicagomed Make an appointment today at 888-824-0200.
Views: 2252 UChicago Medicine
Dinosaurs Couldn’t Stick Out Tongues & Ancient Pandas - 7 Days of Science
 
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This week, it turned out that dinosaurs couldn’t stick out their tongues due to them being rooted to their mouths, and ancient panda remains were analysed. Also; a new method of determining a planet’s atmosphere, new Ediacaran fossils, and more. Join our Discord server: https://discord.gg/3KgpG8J Subscribe to explore the wonderful life around you! Social Media: ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BenGThomas42 ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bengthomas42/ ►Instagram: http://bit.ly/1PIEagv ►Google+: http://bit.ly/1ObHejE Sources: Prehistoric Frogs: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-26848-w Ediacaran Fossils: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180618174854.htm https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08120099.2018.1479306 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08120099.2018.1470110 Ancient Panda: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180618163856.htm https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)30610-9?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982218306109%3Fshowall%3Dtrue Finding new planet atmospheres: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180618113030.htm Ancient crocodile research: http://www.wits.ac.za/news/latest-news/research-news/2018/2018-06/in-the-gaping-mouth-of-ancient-crocodiles.html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180618113025.htm Dinosaur Tongues: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/uota-trc061918.php
Views: 11554 Ben G Thomas
And so it ends
 
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A look at the K-T or K-Pg extinction event, at which time the largest members of Dinosauria went extinct. What happened at this time in earth's history and what can we learn about the animals that died. For a phenomenal video on the topic presented in the 1990's head over to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgxB6BNRbQA&feature=youtu.be&t=0001
Views: 7938 Thomas Evans
Burgess Shale-type fossils in the Middle Ordovician of the Barrandian area (Czech Republic)
 
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by Oldřich Fatka Recorded at the 60th Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Association, Lyon, 2016. Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1
Views: 425 Palaeo cast
Catalysts of the Explosion: Stromatolites and their Ignition of Complex Life on Earth
 
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Rachel Harris, Wellesley College '14, shares her summer experience working with the MIT NASA Astrobiology Team on stromatolite morphogenesis. Presentation conducted at the 2011 Tanner Conference, Wellesley, MA.
Views: 435 Rachel Harris
Episode 68: Fossil plants and the Paleocene Eocene thermal maximum
 
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The Bighorn Basin in Wyoming has been an important area for research into terrestrial ecosystems for decades. The basin formed as part of the uprising of the Rocky Mountains in the west of North America, and sediment from the surrounding mountain ranges was transported into it for millions of years, building up a huge thickness that has fossils from all kinds of life on land preserved within it. Rocks from many different time periods are now exposed in the basin, but a particularly important one is the Paleocene Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) which occurred around 56 million years ago. At this time a huge amount of carbon was released into the atmosphere very quickly, causing a sharp (by geological standards) increase in temperature and dramatic effects on life. Palaeontologists and geologists are particularly interested in studying the PETM as it can potentially give us lots of information about how life and earth systems might respond in the near future to the large quantities of carbon being released into our atmosphere now by humans. In this episode recorded in the field we talk to Dr Scott Wing, who is curator of fossil plants at the Smithsonian in Washington DC but has been coming to the basin every summer for decades. We chat about the geology and history of the area, what it's like to work in the Wyoming desert every summer, how to find and collect fossil plants, and what years of research by many people in the basin has told us about the PETM.
Views: 634 Palaeo cast
Neogene
 
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The Neogene /ˈniːɵdʒiːn/ is a geologic period and system in the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) Geologic Timescale starting 23.03 million years ago and ending 2.58 million years ago. The second period in the Cenozoic Era, it follows the Paleogene Period and is succeeded by the Quaternary Period. The Neogene is subdivided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene and the later Pliocene. The Neogene covers about 20 million years. During this period, mammals and birds continued to evolve into roughly modern forms, while other groups of life remained relatively unchanged. Early hominids, the ancestors of humans, appeared in Africa. Some continental movement took place, the most significant event being the connection of North and South America at the Isthmus of Panama, late in the Pliocene. This cut off the warm ocean currents from the Pacific to the Atlantic ocean, leaving only the Gulf Stream to transfer heat to the Arctic Ocean. The global climate cooled considerably over the course of the Neogene, culminating in a series of continental glaciations in the Quaternary Period that follows. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2039 Audiopedia
The Dawn of Modern Ecosystems: An Early Palaeozoic Carnival of the Animals
 
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Watch this lecture entitled 'The Dawn of Modern Ecosystems: An early palaeozoic carnival of the animals' with Prof David Harper at Van Mildert College as part of the Inaugural Lecture Series on 28 Feb 2013.
Views: 273 DurhamUniversity
Devonian
 
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The Devonian is a geologic period and system of the Paleozoic Era spanning from the end of the Silurian Period, about 419.2 ± 3.2 Mya (million years ago), to the beginning of the Carboniferous Period, about 358.9 ± 0.4. It is named after Devon, England, where rocks from this period were first studied. The Devonian period experienced the first significant adaptive radiation of terrestrial life. Free-sporing vascular plants began to spread across dry land, forming extensive forests which covered the continents. By the middle of the Devonian, several groups of plants had evolved leaves and true roots, and by the end of the period the first seed-bearing plants appeared. Various terrestrial arthropods also became well-established. Fish reached substantial diversity during this time, leading the Devonian to often be dubbed the "Age of Fish". The first ray-finned and lobe-finned bony fish appeared, while the placoderms began dominating almost every known aquatic environment. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3146 Audiopedia
TOP 10 Extinction Events That Came Dangerously Close To Wiping Out All Life On Earth
 
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TOP 10 Extinction Events That Came Dangerously Close To Wiping Out All Life On Earth *********THE TOP 15 THINGS:😬 1. The Great Permian Extinction Was The Most Severe In Earth's History 2. The Cretaceous Extinction Wiped Out The Dinosaurs 3. The Great Oxygenation Almost Suffocated The World 4. The Holocene Extinction Is Happening Right Now 5. The Triassic Extinction Happened In A Relative Blink Of An Eye 6. The Ordovician–Silurian Extinction Events Ravaged Marine Life 7. The Pliocene Supernova Nearly Vaporized The Ozone Layer 8. The Quaternary Extinction Ended The Age Of Giant Mammals 9. The Late Devonian Extinction Killed 75% Of All Life On Earth 10. The End-Ediacaran Extinction Decimated Early Lifeforms -------------------------- Related Video ---------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe for a new video every week! ►► http://bit.ly/2p6htun Connect With Us : Facebook: ►► http://bit.ly/2szT5jH G+ : ►► http://bit.ly/2q8w9Yq Twitter : ►► https://twitter.com/FactsWrack Instagram : ►► http://bit.ly/2oJGWrr For more videos and articles visit: http://factswrack.blogspot.com/ ---------------------Disclaimer----------------------------- If there are any copyright infringement send us a e-mail to us or comment on this video !!! * All rights to the published audio, video, graphics and textual materials belong to their respective owners. If you are the author or copyright owner of any information you use and would like to remove it, please contact us at: [email protected] *For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thanks for watching and stay awesome! #FactsWrack #top_10 #List #Amazing #things_you_didn't_know #things_you_won't_believe
Views: 33 Facts Wrack