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Gold Mine and Geology 101 Series, Episode 1, Mine Terms
 
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The first in our new series of gold mine, mining, and gold geology educational series. Episode 1 focuses on general underground mining terminolgy. Most of what we'll be discussing throughout this series only deals with hard rock/lode mining although we may go over some placer mining as well. Hope you enjoy!
MVM1100 Narrow Vein Mining
 
07:13
Mechanised narrow vein mining
Views: 33473 TheMancalaGroup
Exploring A High Sierra Placer And Lode Mine: Part 2 of 2
 
23:09
As I mentioned in the description section of the first video in this series, this mine got a lot less pleasant in the second half of it! Flooding, low oxygen, monsters popping up out of the water, etc. presented quite the mix of negative experiences… Perhaps the only thing that was not an issue was ground fall (sections where the mine caved). The exception, of course, is the point at which I could not continue any farther where all of that rock and dirt went to the very top of the adit. However, as you undoubtedly noticed with the other ore chutes/ore passes/raises in this mine, a fair amount of gravel and dirt was at the base of each of those that had tumbled down from the upper workings. So, I don’t know that that caved section at the end was a failure in the main haulage adit or if that was a lot of material that had come down from the upper workings through an ore pass/ore chute/raise. Unless someone steps forward with a map, we may never know. Based on prior experience though, I am somewhat inclined toward believing that all of that material came down from the upper workings rather than from the hard rock that this adit consisted of giving way. The oxygen levels definitely became disagreeably low as I continued to push in. You heard how hard I was working for oxygen toward the end of exploring the underground portion of the mine… One probably wouldn’t want to flirt with oxygen levels much lower than that for very long (and that is certainly a good example of why it is likely in any mine explorer’s best interest to fork out the money for an oxygen meter). I was really hoping to discover a way into those upper workings, but the miners cut in way, way below the ancient river channel here and so it was quite a distance to reach the higher levels (In this case, it proved to be an insurmountable distance). I understand that it is difficult to precisely hit the ancient river channels that the miners want to pull the gold out of and there are many examples of gold mines where the miners punched in too high or too low. So, for this mine, I don’t know if it was a slight miscalculation that brought the miners in so far beneath the placer or if it was intentional for some reason I cannot fathom. I thought that all of the artifacts around the remains of the miner’s bunkhouse were extremely interesting. You viewers are pretty savvy – any guesses as to the rough age of the stuff around the bunkhouse? Obviously, there was some work done at this mine in the 1980’s given what was written with the white paint in the main haulage adit (and, presumably, the aluminum ladders date to that time as well), but the bunkhouse was abandoned well before then. The last really serious work at this mine that is mentioned in various mining journals and reports was done in the 1950’s. Of course, that doesn’t mean that it couldn’t have already been abandoned by then too, but that seems a lot closer to an accurate estimate. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy it. This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 16218 TVR Exploring
Our Hard Rock Gold Mine | Initial Testing
 
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First couple of days at our new hard rock gold mine in Oregon. Initial drilling, gathering ore and a little processing of it back at the storage facility until our trailor is completed to process on site. Seems we got better results by just drilling small holes in the wall then panning rather than running full buckets from large amounts of ore we got off the walls. To be continued....
Views: 117145 Bearkat4160
Placer mining operations, 1960s
 
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Miner Bob Young pans for gold at his placer mine in Southcentral Alaska during the late 1960s or early 1970s. He pans for gold, pushes soil into a sluice box with his D9 Caterpillar bulldozer, moves tailings piles, cleans the sluice box, separates gold from soil, and weighs out the gold. John Baker filmed the sequence during the late 1960s or early 1970s and added narration in about 2000 (Color/Sound/16mm film). This sequence contains excerpts from AAF-16369 from the John Baker collection held by the Alaska Film Archives, a unit of the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives Department in the Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks. For more information please contact the Alaska Film Archives This sequence contains excerpts from AAF-16369 from the John Baker collection held by the Alaska Film Archives, a unit of the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives Department in the Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks. For more information please contact the Alaska Film Archives
Views: 11754 Alaska Film Archives
HOW TO TIMBER A MINE SHAFT !!! The Easy Way. ask Jeff Williams
 
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3 techniques used to frame and timber a mine shaft with bolted sets. lap sets that were used for old style timbered mine shafts. https://www.patreon.com/askJeffWilliams Me and Slim show you 3 techniques for timbering a mine shaft so you can do it yourself. Plus you get to see how the old mine shafts were put together to make that beautiful frame work that you see when you visit the mines This is part 1 of a series so stay tuned for more .... So you know what I am gonna say huh... So C'mon....Let's Go !!!!! click here for part 2 https://youtu.be/rWRS4TqebRE Here is a link to pre-cut Mining sets https://selllumber.com/shaft-set/
Views: 16700 Ask Jeff Williams
Buca Della Vena Mine – Part 2: Discovered Underground Mine Train!
 
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Sure, we’ve come across ore carts and trammers before while exploring at abandoned mines. However, finding an intact underground mine train parked with the ore carts still hooked up to the trammer (what miners call the electric locomotive) is something that I have never seen before or since. I’ll give away some of the secrets of the upcoming videos by saying that there is a second part to this train just a short distance farther down the track. I wonder if the operator of the trammer/locomotive felt a twinge of sadness when it was parked underground for the last time? I mentioned in the description and comments of the last video that I would talk more about the history and geology of the abandoned mine in this description. The below is a translation from Italian to English and the translation is not perfect. However, it conveys the relevant information. So, quoting directly, here you go.. “The Buca della Vena Mine (formerly Stazzema Mine) was part of the 15th-16th century Vene Ferralis, although it is believed that works were held there already during the Medicean period. Work restarted between 1850 and 1860, and in 1938 the Pignone of Florence company began excavating. Since 1957, the SIMA company (subsidiary of EDEM) continued to work regularly in the tunnel searching mixed mineral barite-pyrite until 1990. The field is described as a mineral body almost unique with barite, pyrite and iron oxides of good quality. It is oriented NNE/SSW, in the contact zone between shale Unit Fornovolasco, white dolomite and grezzoni. Considerable scientific interest was aroused by the discovery of rare or unique in the world mineralogical species. Minerals mainly extracted are: - barite used for chemicals, pharmaceuticals, petroleum industry and as nuclear power plants insulation - pyrite for chemicals and iron and steel - iron oxides for steel products” Although the mine being explored in this video apparently dates back to the Medicean period, I passed ancient workings while pushing up the canyon walls that date back to the Romans and even the Etruscans. In other words, the iron ore deposits here have not exactly been a secret for thousands of years. The section of the Buca della Vena Mine featured in this video hosted very dark rock and huge open chambers. So, even with multiple lights, it was a struggle to fully illuminate it. While there are certainly some even more impressive pillars and massive chambers to come, the rock is lighter and so that should not be much of an issue going forward. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 18429 TVR Exploring
Lesson 33 Looking for Indicator Minerals
 
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I show how I determine what other minerals may be associated with gold, but are easier to see.
Views: 21355 Hard Rock University
How To Find Gold & Mineral Deposits!
 
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A video which includes several points on how to find gold and minerals, what to look for and the best locations were we find our deposits. Also includes a few gold, silver and copper ore samples. Want to support us? All money will go to fund new videos and some prizes for our patrons! Please go to the link below! https://www.patreon.com/911mining https://shop.spreadshirt.com/911mining Also don't forget to follow us on Facebook! https://m.facebook.com/911mining Thank you & Enjoy! 911 Mining & Prospecting Co
Views: 214507 911 Mining & Prospecting
Underground Forest Of Timbers In Abandoned Mine – Part 1
 
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This abandoned copper mine is one we wanted to visit because we have seen explorers visit the main adit (including Adit Addicts, my exploring buddy for the day), but had never seen that anyone had documented the numerous upper adits of this particular mine. The main section of the mine is quite impressive and it is certainly understandable why explorers focus on it (I cover the ground level as well so that you can have a sense of it too in case this is your first time seeing this mine). In the interest of completeness though, we wanted to cover all that there was to see here. Also, the overlooked abandoned mines or even the overlooked sections of abandoned mines often yield the best historical treasures. I’ll discuss the guts of this mine in more detail when I get to the main section in the next video, but, as I mentioned above, this was a copper mine and, from what we could tell, all of the production took place around the turn of the last century (the 1900s). Apparently, the mine was only active for several years, but they certainly made the most of that time. Although I just explore the ground level in the main section of the mine (in the next video), I will link to other explorers that have visited all of the levels in the main mine so that you can see what it looks like. Teamwork between mine explorers will get all of these old mines explored and documented! The YouTube channel for Adit Addicts can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIXOU8aR7o50X6q2wQ0wbCQ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 34384 TVR Exploring
Historic Gold Mine & Mill Deep In The Forest  - Part 2
 
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There is quite a lot to this abandoned mine site and so while I found a fair amount when I was wandering around on my own, I still missed interesting pieces of mining equipment that Michael showed me the next day. Further, I’m quite confident that there is plenty more scattered around in the brush or underneath the ruined buildings that we both missed. Eventually, forest fires will roar through all of the areas where these abandoned mines we document are located. When that happens, many hidden adits and pieces of metal equipment that were hidden away in brush will be revealed. It certainly isn’t in any way worth having a forest fire for, but it is an interesting side effect. As I mentioned in the prior video in this series, credit for our trip to this mine site goes to Gold Country Explorers. They get out in the forests (mostly in California’s Gold Country) and have an uncanny knack for tracking down stamp mills and other impressive elements of our industrial history – not to mention, a fair number of adits too! Check out their site – they post some great pictures on there: https://www.facebook.com/Gold-Country-Explorers-850167371691275/ It felt good to discover that adit that the Forest Service missed near the top of the hill. They are pretty thorough, but some things are not easy to spot in the forest and many adits are not marked on the topographic map. As I mentioned in the video, I’d like to show you the portal and how this adit was essentially hiding in plain sight. However, if I post that, the Forest Service will be able to find it pretty easily and will be out there as soon as the snow melts to gate it. So, I reluctantly declined to share the view from the outside. Like I said in the video, we need to preserve some of our industrial history outside of a museum. I also think it is important to maintain at least something in the way of the spirit of adventure and the excitement of discovery in our increasingly fearful and risk-averse society. The site of the shaft that we visited toward the end of the video was so badly degraded that I mistakenly speculated that it was an adit (easy to do when there were adits all over the place). However, my subsequent research demonstrated that it was, in fact, a shaft. I could not find many records on it, but the shaft dropped down for almost four hundred feet and apparently had two levels to tap into the hard rock gold veins underground. The large waste rock pile all around that section is supposed to be from the shaft. I’m not sure how the ore was transported from the shaft to the mill, but I’d be curious to know. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 49801 TVR Exploring
Exploring A High Sierra Placer And Lode Mine: Part 1 of 2
 
22:56
As mentioned in the thumbnail image, there are quite a lot of artifacts at this abandoned gold mine. I only show some of them in the first video because I was impatient to get inside of the large adit at this mine. However, after finishing exploring the underground section of the mine, we went out looking around the site more thoroughly and – among other things – discovered the remains of the miner’s bunkhouse. You’ll see in the second video that there were quite a few interesting artifacts at that location. How about those sketchy, rusted ladders seemingly running up into an infinite void? Metal ladders may sound secure, but whatever was anchoring those ladders in the past is no longer present and so they wobbled all over the place (they really didn’t seem like they would hold any weight at all). Furthermore, they were quite rusty and, at least in my experience, when I have encountered rusted metal underground, it has always been extremely brittle. I once accidentally brushed against a thick rusted cable inside of a mine and just that slight pressure snapped the cable. I’m not exaggerating when I say that I just brushed against it too. So, with that experience in mind, I was somewhat leery about climbing wobbly, rusted ladders straight up into the unknown. This was particularly the case given the collapsed section of ladders we already saw and was reinforced by coming across more sections with collapsed metal ladders deeper inside of the mine. At least the underground section of the mine up until the point where this first video ends was pleasant (going in through hard rock, not a lot of water, an absence of ground fall, etc.). In the second video? Not so much… The pelican really threw me… I grew up not far from the location of this abandoned mine and have never seen or heard of pelicans in the area. I normally associate pelicans with the ocean. However, I later recalled that there is a breeding colony of pelicans on Anaho Island at Pyramid Lake in Nevada. So, perhaps it was on a migration route over the Sierras? Regardless, it is still not the type of thing one expects to stumble across in the middle of the forest. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy it. This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 17969 TVR Exploring
Easy Gold & Mineral Exploration/Sampling Method!
 
13:03
Prospecting some new showings and sampling multiple showings for assays some are new and some are re samples for over limits. We had removed about a dozen other samples before the start of the video and in total we got 26 samples. In the video we explain how to sample and what we use when sampling when doing prospecting and hard rock sampling by hand. Most of these outcrops are heavily Mineralized carrying good values of free gold, silver and copper. This sampling is part of a 2018 and 2019 program we are doing so we won't have my assay results till all the samples are sent in once we do that we will update the video description with some of the results. Hope everyone enjoys the video and stay tuned for more! This video was made possible by our silver, gold & platinum patrons support! Thank you to the following patrons: Natural Ore & More, Chelseay D, Lucky Minerals, Chuck Preston, Brian Hollingshead, Cathy Speidel & Mi$fitrick-Ugly Thumb Prospecting. Here is the link: https://www.patreon.com/911mining There is a silver, gold and platinum tier level with different prizes in each. So if you want to be a part of the fun and help us fund extra trips an prizes, as well as upload extra content head on over! Thank you all for your support on patreon and for watching our videos! Don't forget to follow us on Facebook!! Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/911mining Email: [email protected] Thank you & Enjoy! 911 Mining & Prospecting Co
Interesting Underground Gold Mine Stuffed With Quartz
 
27:30
This gold mine is one of those abandoned mines that didn’t look like much at first, but ended up being really interesting… Aside from the complexity of the underground workings we explored, we just kept finding stuff. Well, more accurately, I should say that my exploring buddy kept finding stuff. While I was inside the first adit looking around, Mr. McBride, discovered the lower adit and the buildings above the mine workings. Unfortunately, I don’t know anything about the history of this mine. As with many things, California is behind other states in digitizing the records in their archives. By contrast, Nevada is fantastic in this respect. The Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology and the University of Nevada in Reno have done a really impressive job of digitizing and organizing their records online. So, for example, if you have the name of a mine, you can look through their database and find extensive records and maps for the mine you’re curious about. Obviously, not every historic mine is included in their database, but most are. Even without knowing the history though, it is apparent that this mine is an older mine that was worked off and on for quite a while. It also doesn’t seem to be a big stretch to assume that a respectable amount of gold was extracted. I’m basing that on the size of the workings and how the miners burrowed off in all directions from that quartz core where the pit was. They even went down and ran another adit in... Actually, as I was typing that, I realized that it may have been the other way around. If you’ll recall, the track in the lower adit was the “budget rail” where the miners nailed the metal strips onto boards to run the ore carts over. Since the track in the first adit I entered was solid metal rail, it would suggest the possibility that the miners may have done well enough in the lower adit to afford to splash out on expensive rail when driving a second adit above. In other words, the lower adit may have been the first adit. The mine buildings just above the underground workings were interesting to us given their age. The main building looked just large enough to accommodate a crew of approximately the size of the number of names on the board where the miners would badge in and badge out. It’s possible a mining crew could have worked this operation in the winter, but given its remote location, fairly poor dirt roads and heavy snowfall in the winter, it seems more likely this was a summer mining operation. Was that a grave at the end? What do you guys think that was? ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 70667 TVR Exploring
Finding Placer Gold Locations Using Google Earth - Yankee Gold Prospecting Adventures
 
10:37
http://yankeegoldprospecting.com/ Finding placer gold locations using google earth is fun & effective. In this video I show you the basic things to research. Steep gorges to flat meandering streams. How to pin point the locations & make notes. Then when you are ready for a trip you can write down the GPS. coordinates of the location. Program them into a hand held gps or a vehicle gps, to get you near the chosen area. This technique will work anywhere there is placer gold. Best if you know where gold was originally found. Streams or Rivers that gold has been found, in the past. I ALWAYS FORGET TO MENTION IN MY VIDEOS, THAT I AM A GOLD PROSPECTING GUIDE AS WELL. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO BOOK A TRIP FOR 2012, MY INFORMATION IS ON THE SIDE OF MY YOUTUBE PAGE. 100% GUARANTEED TO FIND YOU GOLD & TEACH YOU HOW TO FIND MORE ON YOUR OWN. Join me on Facebook for great group chat & information. New information added every week. Search Yankee Gold Prospecting New England on FB. Hope you have great success in your search for GOLD. Copyright 2012; Yankee Gold Prospecting NE. All rights reserved. you do NOT have my permission to utilize any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to my photos, videos and/or the comments made about my photos / videos or any other "picture" art posted on my profile.No part of this video may be used or reproduced. You are hereby notified that you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, or distributing. The foregoing prohibitions also apply to your employee , agent , student or any personnel under your direction or control or direction. in any manner or means, including print, electronic, mechanical, or by any information storage and retrieval system whatsoever, without written permission from the copyright holder.
Views: 386492 YankeeGoldProspecting
Underground Gold Mine Blasting, Southern Oregon
 
05:30
Ever wonder would it would be like to work and blast 400 feet underground in a gold mine? We take you there up-close and personal. We blast underground in a historic working gold mine in Southern Oregon. For more information, send me an email at [email protected]
How Gold Mining Works
 
03:37
Ever wonder how people mined for gold? Have no fear! You can use a pan, a large drill, and even explosives! Anthony did some digging and found out many of the methods that people get that rare substance out of the ground and into your wallet! Don't miss Discovery's epic three-night event! Klondike premieres Monday, January 20th at 9|8c on Discovery Read More: Modern Gold Mining http://money.howstuffworks.com/30924-modern-gold-mining-video.htm "With the price of gold at all time highs, a familiar fever is sweeping Alaska." Gold Price Ounce http://www.goldpriceoz.com/ "Current gold prices per ounce and gold prices history." Improvements in Stope Drilling and Blasting For Deep Gold Mines http://www.saimm.co.za/Journal/v075n06p139.pdf "The rate of face advance in the gold mines is between 3 and 10 m a month, with a median value of about 5 m a month; it follows that faces are blasted less frequently than is planned." Gold Mining - Methods http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_mining#Methods "Placer mining is the technique by which gold has accumulated in a placer deposit is extracted." How Does Gold Mining Work? http://www.wisegeek.com/how-does-gold-mining-work.htm "Gold mining can use several different techniques, depending on the situation involved and the type of mining being done." What is the Role of Cyanide in Mining? http://www.miningfacts.org/environment/what-is-the-role-of-cyanide-in-mining/ "Cyanide is a naturally occurring chemical that is found in low concentrations throughout nature including in fruits, nuts, plants, and insects." Gold Fun Facts http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/gold/eureka/gold-fun-facts "It has been estimated that, worldwide, the total amount of gold ever mined is 152,000 metric tons, only enough to fill 60 tractor trailers." Watch More: 5 Surprising Uses for Gold http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnsJEEEgbvY TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-437-pets-make-us-healthier?utm_campaign=DNWC&utm_medium=DNews&utm_source=YT The Truth About Diamonds http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjUCAMFVjaY ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
Views: 278401 Seeker
Lode Gold Sampling Underground
 
03:23
Sampling for lode gold in a historic lode mine in Oregon.
Views: 534 Kerby Jackson
How Do You Find a Gold Vein? Mining 101: Ep 12.
 
02:33
Chairman of Exeter Resource Corp. Yale Simpson explains how you find a vein that is worth mining. From wiki: The difference between 19th century and modern mining techniques and the type of ore sought is based on the grade of material being mined and the methods of mining which are used. Historically, hand-mining of gold ores permitted the miners to pick out the lode quartz or reef quartz, allowing the highest-grade portions of the lodes to be worked, without dilution from the unmineralised wall rocks. Modern mining using larger machinery and equipment forces the miners to take low-grade waste rock in with the ore material, resulting in dilution of the grade. However, modern mining and assaying allows the delineation of lower-grade bulk tonnage mineralisation, within which the gold is invisible to the naked eye. In these cases, veining is the subordinate host to mineralisation and may only be an indicator of the presence of metasomatism of the wall-rocks which contains the low-grade mineralisation. For this reason, veins within hydrothermal gold deposits are no longer the exclusive target of mining, and in some cases gold mineralization is restricted entirely to the altered wall rocks within which entirely barren quartz veins are hosted. For More Information, Visit: http://www.exeterresource.com http://www.evenkeelmedia.com Sign up for our FREE newsletter! https://secure.campaigner.com/CSB/Public/Form.aspx?fid=541179
Views: 8525 Even Keel Media
ROCKS to GOLD !!!. ask Jeff Williams
 
19:23
Ever wanted to turn rocks into Gold and work in an underground Gold Mine, well now you can....and keep all the Gold you mine out....just click the link and make a $10 pledge https://www.patreon.com/askJeffWilliams We go deep underground to mine out that Beautiful Yellow Metal..... . GOLD !!!! and then we take it back to the Ranch to Mill it down and then run it over the Shaker table to get even the finest Gold particles....... Then the Super cons are processed over a Multi sluice for final cleanup and what you have left is a Pan full of GOLD !!!!!! We want to thank everyone that made it out for our underground mining adventures and we hope to see them all back here real soon..... We also want to thank Jeff and Nic Nac out at the Ranch for taking care of us while we were not mining.... Can't wait to get back out there and do it again... So you know what I am gonna say ...huh So C'mon....Let's Go !!!!!!!
Views: 26498 Ask Jeff Williams
Exploring A Large Limestone Mine - Part 1
 
16:19
This is the first abandoned limestone mine I ever explored and it is a big one… As an essential ingredient in concrete, this mine was brought into existence together with a nearby concrete producer in 1910. Underground mining continued into the early 1960’s before the focus shifted to the open pit mining of limestone nearby. Although significantly remodeled over the years, the concrete production plant remains open. My exploring buddy for this day is Alessio (who introduced me to this site) and his exploring channel can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoy6TTAGyJDVPxv9DQrs3LA As it is sedimentary, limestone is made up of the skeletal remains of countless living creatures such as coral and foraminifera. I suppose it is somewhat morbid to consider that when walking on a concrete sidewalk, for example, that we are tromping on the corpses of millions of living creatures. Taking it a step further, consider that limestone is a common ingredient in toothpaste as well! It’s labeled as calcium carbonate should you choose to examine your toothpaste. This mine is located in the region of Tuscany, which is more commonly associated with fine wine and historic cities such as Florence and Siena. However, I assure you that it has a very fine selection of abandoned mines as well. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 6196 TVR Exploring
Secret Miner’s Cabin & Mines In The Sierra Nevada - Part 1
 
16:18
Probably less than a dozen people know about the historic miner’s cabin hidden away on this mining claim - and even fewer still know about the abundance of gold mines found here… It remains a secret because the people that do know where this is remain tight-lipped about it and this cabin and mines are located in an absolute black hole on topographic and other maps. There is simply nothing marked anywhere near here. With the contractors for the Forest Service, BLM, Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) programs, et al working overtime (with taxpayer money) to get all of these historic mines erased, it is very nice to be introduced to some gold mines that are not (currently) in danger of being permanently closed. It is a shame that we have to wallow in such secrecy simply to protect a historically significant site from the very entities that should be preserving it, but such is the upside down world we live in. The two adits featured in this video appear to be quite old. I was able to find a couple of references to the mines consolidated on this claim in mining journals dating back to the turn of the last century and they were described as already having been worked for a while at that time. So, initial work here probably dates back to around the time of California’s “Gold Rush” era. The earliest gold miners in California were placer miners. However, when the easy pickings from the surface were worked out, they became lode miners and headed underground to start chasing the veins where the gold in the creeks originated from (some underground miners also chased the rich placer left behind by ancient river channels that were buried millions of years ago). The little hole by the creek under the huge boulder would have been referred to as a “coyote hole” by the miners of the time. These were in abundance along the creeks and rivers of California in the early days as the miners pursued gold flakes and nuggets back into the rocks and gravel lining the waterways. So, it seems likely that the small adit we visited first would have been the one developed initially and then the larger adit punching into the hard rock would have come along later. In further support of the idea that these mines are older rather than newer is that, although it may possibly have been there at one point, there was no sign of rail at the mines we visited. The claim owner also stated that he has never seen any sign of rail here either. It is not difficult to imagine a swarm of miners crawling all over these canyon walls like ants during the “Gold Rush” era, churning up the creeks and digging out coyote holes. This initial surge of miners, however, would have been followed by a more patient, more sophisticated group of miners that had an eye on heading underground. At the second adit shown in this video, for example, you could have had something like a father and son team or two brothers slowly working away at that lode mine for years, chasing those quartz veins and hauling load after load of ore and waste rock out in wheelbarrows. I’m giving more of a general feel for the area with these videos rather than showing every single bit of mining history present as both sides of this canyon are covered in mines and the remains of mining equipment. We’ll see more of that in the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines that I have explored: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 94156 TVR Exploring
Exploring Active Mines: Alleghany's Sixteen to One Mine
 
31:36
Located in the California mountain town of Alleghany, the Sixteen to One Mine is now the oldest gold mining corporation in the United States and with more than 26 miles of underground workings, it is a seriously impressive operation! This remarkably rich lode gold mine was located in 1896 by a man named Thomas Bradbury in his backyard (we should all be so lucky). More than a million ounces of gold have been extracted from the Sixteen to One Mine over the course of its existence (an amount worth well over a billion US dollars at current gold prices) and there is still much more gold inside of the mine waiting to be found... The gold inside of the Sixteen to One Mine does not follow a set pattern and is instead found in rich pockets randomly scattered across the quartz vein that the mine follows. Some of the pockets of gold are as small as an ounce or two and others contain tens of thousands of ounces of gold. The very existence of the Sixteen to One Mine revolves around locating these pockets of gold. The lower levels of the mine are presently flooded, but they are being dewatered at this time as the Sixteen to One Mine has two new gold detectors with proven successes in identifying gold in quartz previously undetected with older models. The potential of this new technology has inspired the company to pay the price of dewatering and rehabilitating the lower levels of the mine in order to pursue the gold they know is down there. No one has walked inside of the 3000 level since 1939 and so one can only imagine what might be found down there now. At present rates of pumping, the water in the lower levels of the mine is dropping at the rate of about 100 feet per month and access to the 3000 level may be restored by as soon as June of 2018. On this visit, we entered through the 800 Crosscut and first proceeded to the 49 Winze. Following this, we then headed deeper inside of the mine before dropping down through multiple levels to an incredible cavern that the miners carved out inside of the Sixteen to One Mine - the company calls this “The Ballroom” for its immense size and acoustics… For more information on the Sixteen to One Mine or even to buy physical gold or stock shares from the company, one can visit their website at: http://www.origsix.com/ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 42959 TVR Exploring
Drilling pattern in underground mining   | wedge cut drilling pattern |MINING GURUKUL
 
03:49
In this video explain the wedge cut pattern which is used in solid blasting. Important questions for mining compition exam https://youtu.be/nfm7rutwzbo *Secondary blasting https://youtu.be/Zehzl5U6gak Subgrade drilling- https://youtu.be/yQS0oaFgjZw Delay detonator - https://youtu.be/NmHofjCf7nI Like Mining Gurukul in fb https://m.facebook.com/Mining-Gurukul-2239455669710985/ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Important questions tor mining sirdar, overman and other exams| MINING GURUKUL| in hindi" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfm7rutwzbo -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 1728 MINING GURUKUL
HOW TO DIG A TUNNEL !!! Drift Mining for Gold.... ask Jeff Williams
 
07:34
Want to know How To Dig a Tunnel , well ask no more cause we will teach you how to dig one in just about any material. We also will so you basic tunnel drifting techniques to find Gold. What could be more fun then that.. This is part one of a multi part series ....so stay tuned. Click the link below to see the PDF file on Tunnel shoring. http://www.idahogeology.org/PDF/Bulletins_(B)/B-21.pdf Watch the full movie " Mother Lode " at this link. https://youtu.be/4amYHy6Fsts Show your Support by going to Patreon and making a Pledge. https://www.patreon.com/askJeffWilliams
Views: 33595 Ask Jeff Williams
Big Stopes & Collapses in the Abandoned Evergreen Mine
 
10:44
The Evergreen Mine contains several thousand feet of workings, if not more. It is evident from the tailings piles that this mine produce a very large amount of ore. However, limited documentation of the mine's history makes it difficult to report any sure-fire information on this mine. In the video you will see two large air tanks, ore chutes, big stopes, dynamite storage, ore cart rails and more! One adit that I entered was extremely dangerous. If you come across this site, please stay out! Abandoned mines are extremely dangerous, Mines of the West does not recommend entering abandoned mines. This video is for entertainment purposes only. Stay out stay alive!
Views: 3728 Mines of the West
Incredibly Rare Wooden Ore Cart Found Inside A Mine!
 
22:15
Well, we certainly don’t come across something like this every day when we’re out exploring… Just like the abandoned steam engine we featured in another video, this is one of those incredible once in a lifetime finds. There are precious few of these wooden ore carts left in existence and even fewer that can still be found at an abandoned mine rather than rotting away in someone’s backyard. Fortunately, this mine is not marked on any topographic maps and it is in a very remote area of the desert. I believe this is what has protected it from the vermin that ransack these sites to sell the historical artifacts on eBay. Were it not for these circumstances, the wooden ore cart would have undoubtedly disappeared a long time ago. We have found bits and pieces of the metal frames of wooden ore carts in and around some of the old (1800s) mines in California’s “Mother Lode” region. So, obviously, they were used there. However, the wood has long since rotted away and whatever was left of the abandoned carts has disintegrated with time and exposure to the elements. If you consider it, wooden ore carts actually made a lot of sense for the miners in the past that were venturing out over steep mountains and down deep canyons, often over little more than primitive trails. Rather than needing to use a team of mules to haul a backbreakingly heavy metal ore cart up a sheer cliff to a mine, the miners could have hauled out the relatively lightweight (except for the wheels) components and then assembled the carts from the plentiful trees growing around the mine. And, as was mentioned in the video, if something breaks, the miners could just cut another tree down and repair the cart. From the look of it, the wooden ore cart at this mine in the video may have likewise been constructed from the trees found around the mine. As for the mine itself, which was almost an afterthought for me after finding the wooden ore cart, it wasn’t a huge mine, but I thought it was an interesting little mine all the same, no? The flickering effect created by the LEDs on the video drove me nuts when I was editing it, but focusing on the features of the mine, I liked the way the mine twisted around until it reached that small raise and the winze. Given how clean this first section of the mine was, I can only conclude that that section is the one that was worked most recently and the area behind the skip car (where the rails for the ore carts disappeared) was driven during the early days of the mine and then abandoned. I don’t blame the miners for abandoning that section of the mine given how soft the material there was. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 197016 TVR Exploring
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine - Part 1
 
25:37
Buckle up for an extended series on one of my favorite abandoned mines… I’ve shown a number of smaller mines recently to set the stage for the explore of this huge abandoned mine – an abandoned mine that is filled with a number of incredible features that I have never seen anywhere else. I can sincerely say without hesitation that this is the most unique abandoned mine that I have ever explored. And having visited hundreds of mines by now, that is not a statement that I make lightly! Right at the start, the wind roaring out of the portal should give you a hint of the scale of this mine and what is ahead. At one point in the video, you’ll hear me ask how long we have been hiking in for and that reply from my exploring buddy on this trip is not a joke. Perhaps needless to say, we were pretty worn out after finishing this explore and went through a LOT of batteries! You might be curious about the history of this mine? As the title implies, the primary ore here was silver, but large pockets of gold and lead were discovered as well. The rich deposits at this site were first discovered in the 1870s and the adit we entered the mine through was driven in the 1880s to connect with earlier workings in this mining district. Peak production took place over the next couple of decades, but sporadic work continued through the 1960s. As the underground workings connect several different mines, it is impossible now to tell where one historic mine ended and another began. However, just be aware that you are seeing what were once several mines that have been consolidated into one. Obviously, I cut out almost all of the walk in because it was mostly featureless tunnel and I figured you didn’t want to see two full-length videos of us just walking. Although, I was tempted to have a video of that just so you could see how long the walk in is! However, the wind noise is annoying and so you are receiving the highlights version of the long walk we made to get to the heart of the mountain where the good stuff like that elevator and historic hoist were to be found. Don’t worry, the wind noise goes away once we really get inside. That inclined winze we follow up in the coming videos leads to some really amazing finds… If you’re a fan of any of the content that has been on this channel, stick with this series because this mine plays host to some of the best stuff we have ever found. The “we” on this explore was another YouTuber that goes by the handle of “Mines of the West” and has a focus on exploring abandoned mines in Oregon and Washington. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 21351 TVR Exploring
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 2
 
18:26
After exploring what was possible to explore (or that we were willing to explore) off to the left side of the main hub of this gigantic mine, we made our way back over to explore the right side. This meant heading down the large passage taking off from the underground workshop… The number of drifts and inclines fanning out in all directions was staggering and we had to stay focused in order to maintain some order in our exploring. Fortunately, we were able to get into areas of open stoping (with natural support) on this side of the mine and to see some of the minerals the miners were seeking. Additionally, on several occasions, we were able to look up to (or down to) different levels in this mine, suggesting that the underground workings were even greater than we had already imagined. Interestingly, this side of the abandoned mine was in far better shape than the other side and we encountered hardly any water. I should mention that with this mine I have edited many, many hours of exploring down to a manageable clip that shows the noteworthy features, but spares my dear viewers the tedious viewing of us walking, walking, walking and walking some more (and then walking some more) down miles of featureless drifts. The primary mineral extracted at this mine was zinc, but copper, lead, silver and even molybdenum, among other minerals, were recovered as well. Headframe Hunters, who was kind enough to do some research on this mine for us, had the following to share on the geology of the mine: “It was a mid-grade zinc mine - the primary zinc ore type mined is sphalerite (zinc sulfide, commonly called jack), which explains the acid mine drainage and hydrogen sulfide you encountered. The deposit is probably an igneous-hosted hydrothermal vein-type deposit; a limestone-hosted MVT like we have in Missouri would have buffered out all the acid.” Ultimately, this mine closed due to a period of low zinc prices rather than because the mine was played out. There are actually a significant quantity of valuable minerals still underground at this abandoned mine. * Thank you to Headframe Hunters and Mines of the West for the information they were able to dredge up on this abandoned mine * ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 40252 TVR Exploring
An Unusual Gold Mine In Nevada
 
23:44
In this video, I endeavor to spare you, my dear viewers, from having to make the long drive to the middle of nowhere in Nevada (along with the associated costs for fuel and damage to your vehicle on the rough road in). In addition, you are able to avoid the relatively long, hot hike up to this abandoned mine. And, of course, you are also spared from needing to spend any time underground in this sketchy abandoned mine as well. Now don’t get me wrong, we (usually) enjoy this sort of thing, but most probably would not… The mineral potential of this area was first recognized in the mid-1800s and a town and mill sprang up around the areas in the canyon that looked most promising very shortly thereafter. However, no one appears to have gotten rich here and (as with countless mining towns) everything slowly faded away, interspersed with only brief flurries of activity when new discoveries or economic conditions temporarily brought miners out into the hills again. There are surprisingly few records available on this specific mine. Although it is mentioned that work took place here in the 1930s, the only years that we could find production data for were for two years in the 1940s. This was primarily a gold mine, but some silver was extracted here as well. The official production figures were not terribly inspiring, but it seems that contemporary mining companies still poke around this site from time to time – even in those small, fractured stopes underground as could be seen from the surveyor’s flags... Although samples have been taken, to my knowledge, no modern exploratory work has been conducted. My exploring buddy on this trip was Mines of the West: https://www.youtube.com/user/GramVideos95 ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 65605 TVR Exploring
How to blasting mining surface and underground
 
16:08
No description because just do it
Views: 101 Putra Panass
Impressive Woodwork In The Abandoned Upper Butte Mine
 
17:54
As can be plainly seen by the diminished status of the portal, it won’t be long before this mine is no longer accessible. Given the activity of the seasonal creek and the significant amounts of water that pour into this mine every year, I’d guess no more than a season or two... As such, I’m very glad we got the chance to visit as we may well be the last visitors to this mine. Ever. And this is very likely the only video footage that exists of this mine. I find that to be somewhat sad, but the mountains and deserts are absolutely filled with historic mines like this that have been lost forever. I’ve seen mind-blowing old photographs from the inside of mines not far from the one seen in this video. Perhaps they are still impressive underground, but they are no longer accessible and, on the surface, there is little trace of them and the men that struggled, sweated and bled there. At least we were able to get into this mine in its final days to capture what will soon be gone. So, what was the deal with the ore chute? Ore chutes are supposed to be free of obstructions with sides as smooth as possible to facilitate the ore easily sliding down them to the waiting ore carts below. The large ore chute in this mine seemed to break those rules. The sides were not smooth and those boards laid across the supports would get in the way of ore or waste rock being dropped down (if the impact didn’t break the boards). Given the quality of the woodwork, I do not have the impression that the miners didn’t know what they were doing. So, I really don’t know what was going on there. Any ideas? I’m also a bit puzzled by the function of that fantastic wood-lined raise. I understand the purpose of the wood in preventing rock from sloughing off the sides and it looked really cool to have all sides of the square covered. However, what was the real purpose of that structure in the first place? So, the miners could access an upper level? Well, obviously, but what did they do when they got up there? There was no ore chute to drop ore down. So, what were they doing up there and why was such a large opening necessary if it was just providing access to the miners? If it connects to the workings accessed by the ore chute, what is the need for the raise since the miners could have just climbed up the manway next to the ore chute to access those workings? I hate unanswered questions like these as we will likely never know the answer. This is the first time that I have explored an abandoned mine in this part of the Sierra Nevada. The region was off of my radar, but after a very precise tip from a viewer, I saw quite quickly that overlooking this area had been a mistake. Having already picked a lot of the low-hanging fruit around us, tips from viewers are becoming increasingly important (hint hint). We don’t have the money or time to run off to Nevada, Alaska, Italy, Germany, Indonesia, Slovenia, etc. every week for a new video. So, we need that local knowledge to help steer us toward some good mines to explore! ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 11469 TVR Exploring
A Most Unexpected Gold Mine In The High Sierra
 
23:43
This is actually not our first visit to this abandoned gold mine, but this is our first visit to THIS part of the mine. We couldn’t shake the feeling that we had missed something on our first exploring visit… So, after a couple of years, we returned to this abandoned mine high up in the mountains to take a second look at it. We found more surface workings where the miners had carved out trenches surrounding quartz veins and we observed that some of the surface workings we had seen before were looking much more eroded and precarious despite the relatively short passage of time (abandoned mines tend to have a short shelf life). Of much more significance though, while assessing what we thought was a simple ore pass to a caved adit below, we discovered something quite unexpected, which is the subject of this video… There was some confusion on our part as to whether what we found was a simple ore pass or a shaft. So, you’ll hear us refer to it as both. It was open to the surface and dropped down through various drift levels like a shaft. However, they also dumped ore down from surface workings at the top – like an ore pass - in order for it to be processed in the mill below. Sometimes these things are difficult to classify. So, what do you think it should be called? I apologize for the footage that is less stable than that to which you are accustomed, but you’ll recall the formula I have shared before: The more remote and harder a mine is to reach, the less gear I will be taking with me. I didn’t even have extra camera batteries for this one. Just my helmet, my handheld flashlight, gloves and my camera. That’s it. Yes, this is a remote mine. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 44400 TVR Exploring
Buca Della Vena Mine – Part 1: Most Awesome Mine I’ve Ever Explored
 
21:41
I have explored literally hundreds of abandoned mines now and some of them have been quite impressive on many levels. However, none have been as impressive as this abandoned mine: the Buca della Vena Mine… What makes this the best abandoned mine I have ever explored? It has everything we love in wonderful abundance - intact mining equipment left everywhere, complex underground workings (this isn’t just some boring haulage adit), a fantastic setting, interesting geology, multiple mining techniques on display, it hasn’t been picked over by a lot of people and isn’t under threat from American federal agencies that thrive on destroying historical abandoned mines, etc. Often, there is a certain feeling of relief upon exiting an abandoned mine and becoming reacquainted with fresh air and sunlight. However, I was genuinely sorry to leave this mine and went back through parts of it again on the excuse of making sure that I hadn’t missed any sections. That said, I did not climb up into every single stope and I did not have the ropes that would have been needed in order to be able to access a couple of chambers. So, given how much was in the rest of this mine, there could still be incredible discoveries to be made up in those little chambers and pockets. “Buca della Vena” translates literally into Italian as “hole of the vein.” “Vein” in this context is a reference to blood and, when you see the inside of this mine, I think you’ll agree that it was named well. The information online regarding the location of this mine is inaccurate. So, with just a rough idea where it was, I parked at the bottom of the canyon below the mine and charged straight up the side of the cliffs. As it turned out, this was the most difficult way possible. I was fighting through thorn-infested blackberry thickets on almost vertical slopes and at one point I actually had to climb a tree to get up the canyon since it was so steep (Bear in mind, I’m doing this while carrying 50 pounds of mine exploring equipment in my pack). I eventually reached a trail that led me to the remains of a tram system. At that point, I thought I had reached the mine, but I had actually just discovered an old stone house high up on the cliffs that was served by the small tram. So, I had to backtrack down the trail and continue fighting and struggling up the canyon walls until I finally reached level ground where the ore cart rail for the mine ran. Of course, once I reached the Buca della Vena Mine, I discovered that there was an easy trail leading up to the mine that ended up starting less than a hundred feet from where I had parked. One silver lining to the rough route I took though was that I passed by several sites with ancient Roman workings. I’ll talk more about the geology of the mine in the description for the next video... ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 21111 TVR Exploring
Exploring Abandoned Mines: The White Chief Mine – Part 2
 
24:12
This level made me really fall in love with this abandoned mine… After making my way through the massive open stope just past the portal, I wound my way into the mountain following the track of this adit. Chuck was still exploring at the top sections of the mine and Frank and Paul had already gone into this level before me. So, I started out on my own. My favorite section was where the adit opens up into the large stope chamber and the rails branch off to the left to go into the stope and also carry off to the right to go deeper into the mine. As I mentioned in the last video, there are surprisingly few records available on this abandoned mine aside from the MRDS listing that describes this as a tungsten mine. However, believe it or not, the MRDS has been known to have incorrect information before. Shocking, I know. Regardless of whether we have much information though, this mine offered some great underground time… ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 13854 TVR Exploring
Awesome Color Show In An Abandoned Mine
 
31:39
This abandoned mine had more than one “most” and THAT is impressive because a “most” is, by definition, a rare occurrence. However, this mine was, in fact, the most colorful that I have ever explored and also had timber sets that were under the most severe pressure that I have ever seen before. Pretty impressive to have two “mosts” in one mine, wouldn’t you agree? Now, I’m afraid that many viewers are going to ask me which minerals are creating those splendid colors inside of the mine. The short answer is that I am not a geologist and I don’t know. However, I would normally associate those blues with copper ores. The mineral that looked like chunks of gold scattered between the blues is actually pyrite (also known as “fool’s gold”). Trust me, miners would not leave visible chunks of gold behind! There were, of course, veins of quartz mixed in as well. Known minerals to have been extracted at this site include silver, copper, tungsten, lead, zinc and gold. As with many mines in Nevada, it started out as a silver mine though. I don’t get rattled too easily when exploring abandoned mines, but those shattered timbers toward the end made me very uncomfortable. It was dry in this mine and so those timbers didn’t look like that because they were rotted, but because they seemed to be getting squeezed in from the sides with incredible force. I say that the intense pressure seemed to be coming from the sides rather than the top because the ties for the ore cart rails were snapped in half and it was, primarily, the timbers on the ribs (sides) of the adit that were snapped. The snapped timbers supporting the back (top) looked as if they were broken from being squeezed from both sides rather than from something pressing down on them. I am, frankly, amazed that those timbers have not caved yet as it seemed like just a bat farting back there would create enough of a disturbance to bring that whole section of the mine crashing down. I’m referring to the proverbial straw breaking the camel’s back and that section didn’t seem like that would need much of a straw to finish things. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 43126 TVR Exploring
Secret Miner’s Cabin & Mines In The Sierra Nevada  - Part 2
 
11:30
With this second video, we climb up the side of the canyon above the historic miner’s cabin. These are just some of the gold mines on this claim… The early miners were very busy in this canyon and evidence of their work is all over the place. Some of this evidence is just unusual divots in the earth or stacks of rocks and other times one can find old bottles or bits of metal. However, we also found the remains of a tram system and there are other mining equipment treasures scattered around that the claim owner has discovered over the years. And then, of course, there are the mines themselves. I wonder how many are covering these canyon walls that have eroded shut and have been lost to history? Given how steep this canyon is, the tram system was not a surprise, but it is still an impressive level of sophistication for a mining area that is completely off the radar now. Waste rock would have just been dumped in front of the adit, but presumably the gold ore was trammed down to that stamp mill we saw in the first video for processing. We had to drop down into the first adit that you’ll see in this video, but that is not the way the miner’s accessed this claim. Where we were standing looking back at the large mound of dirt obstructing the portal was the original floor level of this mine, but the portal has almost completely filled in with dirt since the miners were last busy here. We are fortunate that it is open at all. Completely obscured by that mound of dirt is another drift that took off to the right (from the perspective of facing the portal). We suspected something was back there based on the shape of the adit and so, as I was crawling out of the mine, I squeezed over to that side and there was a small gap where I could see into the short drift there. It didn’t run back that far and, in fact, I could see the end of it from where I was sprawled out on the mound of dirt. There weren’t any mining artifacts or anything like that inside. The rumored ore cart in that lower drift level was quite interesting to me though! Unfortunately, that was a particularly sketchy section of the mine. Those huge slabs around the side of that winze were very precariously balanced there and, as you saw, that winze goes vertical before reaching the next level. I would love to go back with proper gear to be able to get down to that level, but it would be sporty. The last adit – again, completely different from the others – had the most amount of visible quartz, but it presumably was not particularly rich or it would have been a lot bigger. That adit seemed more exploratory in nature given how the miners were meandering off in different directions inside. They obviously did not run out of quartz. So, the gold content must have been too low to justify pursuing it. There were some nice crystals in there though! Thank you again to the claim owner and his dog, Shade, for sharing this site with us. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 43010 TVR Exploring
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 1
 
25:49
Consistent with its status as one of the biggest abandoned mines in Nevada, it requires a hike of thousands of feet and a significant elevation decline just to get down to where the underground workings really begin at this massive mine… As can be seen near the start of this video, there are twin portals and passages running parallel down to the underground workings. Our guess was that this was because one passage was for traffic entering the mine and the other for traffic departing the mine. Deep underneath the mountain, the passages converge on a main hub from which drifts branch out in all directions. At the heart of this hub is a breakroom and a large workshop. A large drift takes off to the right from the workshop, while to the left a drift meanders away and another passage descends deeper into the bowels of the mountain. In this first video, we explore the hub of the mine as well as the workings taking off to the left from the hub. Following the descending passage, we were eventually blocked by flooding as the mine workings continue deep beneath the water level inside of the mine. One can only imagine how many miles of workings are under those dark waters. Fortunately, the other main drift taking off to the left was on a slight upward incline and so the water drained down and (mostly) out. With the miles of underground workings at this abandoned mine stretching well into the double digits, one might expect there to be quite a lot of information available on this site. However, that is not the case. There is surprisingly little information to be found online and the various government agencies involved with this site have done a pretty thorough job of scrubbing references to it from their public databases. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 96644 TVR Exploring
Amazing Underground Waterfalls in a Flooded, Abandoned Mine
 
12:03
The flooded, abandoned mine in this video features several thousand feet of winding, wet, water-filled workings. During our exploration and documentation of this mine, we came across an impressive waterfall cascading down a timbered and laddered raise. Farther in the mine, we found ourselves at the bottom of a large, wooden headframe with ladders and platforms which had water dripping and trickling down it from upper levels. The amazing footage in this video was originally shot in the spring of 2009. However, I misplaced the memory card that held this footage and only found it recently. The card was still intact, and the footage it contained was pristine as the day it was shot. Enjoy! View and use the information in my videos at your own risk. All abandoned mines (especially the ones in my videos) are very dangerous and should not be entered under any circumstances. Potentially life-threatening, dangerous, or legal decisions and assumptions should not be made based on any information in my videos. #ExploringAbandonedMines #AbandonedMines #MineExploring #UndergroundExploration #UndergroundWaterfall
History of Cornish Mining - Holman's Test Mine Explored - Poldark Times
 
08:47
Today I have been kindly invited to explore the Holman's test mine. Whilst I show you around the mine I will tell you a bit about the history of the rock drill and the famous Holman's Factory. Holmans was formed in 1801 by John Holman, then in 1881-The brothers John Henry and James Miners Holman, had taken over running the business from their father John. The Holman Brothers Test Mine - was originally developed to showcase and test Holman's rock drills and other equipment. Their earliest rock drills were put to the test here in 1882 and to commercial use in Cornish Tin mines and South Wales Coal mines, it marked the start of an era lasting until the 1990's. However it was a market the Brothers had to break into as rock drills by Doering had been in use in Cornish Mines since 1867. The invention of the first rock drill dates back to a patent in 1849 belonging to W.J Fowle of Boston USA, this was a steam driven drill that was an extension of the piston with rotation added. Early rock drills were waterless and the effect on miners health was catastrophic, silicosis cause through breathing the rock dust into the lungs lead many miners to an early grave, probably to a greater extent than their predecessors, these drills had the nickname of widow makers because drill operators at this time had a life expectancy of 4 years. It was not until the 1920's that water was introduced at the tip of the rock drill making it a lot safer to work with. Development of this type of drill led to a boom in the 1960's with the Holman Silver 303 as a sinker, stopper and air leg machines. The silver 303 was the drill I used while mining at Geevor on 18 Treglowns lode, I used the stoping variety and it was extremely fast at drilling granite and very accurate due to the built in air leg making narrow vein stoping a real art. During an 8 hour shift I would drill between 17 and 21 8 foot holes, then charge and blast them by means of electric detonators. We would still hold our breath whilst collaring the hole due to the dust but as soon as full power was on the dust would instantly die. Holmans Brothers factory was situated in Camborne near Tesco supermarket and at its height employed over 3000 people on 3 different sites, it shows the amount of wealth and work that mines from around the world can bring to an area . Camborne School of Mines now manage the test mine located south of Camborne, Students are able to learn how to drill charge and fire explosive rounds as well as learning how to survey the mine using both traditional and cutting-edge methods, such as using laser 3D scanning equipment. Being a granite mine with no lode makes it a safe environment for the next generation of future Cornish Cornish miners in an area almost certainly to prosper from current metal prices. Filmed 16th July 2013 with GoPro3 Hero Black Edition. Tags. cornish tin mining, mining, cornwall, tim mining, stoper,stoping, pasty,mining history, cornish history, hand drilling, drilling, blasting, holmans, holman, History of mining or mining history
Views: 3808 Gary Parrott
Mojave Prospect 1 Preliminary Sampling Survey
 
12:25
We take representative samples from a small hard rock mine in Mojave County Arizona and analyze them. The results were rather unexpected.
Views: 1804 Hard Rock University
Underground Mine Exploration
 
04:43
Going underground in an abandoned mine.
Views: 379 NelsonStudios
Allan's Gold Mining - Drilling for Placer Gold !!
 
15:05
A low cost simple drilling rig platform for placer gold exploration. Portable steel frame helps eliminate the jarring torque encountered while operating a posthole drill unit.
Views: 14601 Allan's Gold Mining
What Is Placer Gold's Story? See where to find Platinum too.
 
09:56
See where placer gold and platinum nugget shapes tell a story of what to look for to find more gold nuggets (or platinum deposits too.) Relates to https://Sourdoughminer.com/20-20/ placer gold and lode gold prospecting techniques.
Views: 523 Prospector Jess
Exploring Abandoned Mines: The Marigold Mine
 
15:13
Yes, it IS possible to get to slightly more remote places in Nevada, but not to places that are MUCH more remote than this abandoned mine… Discovered in 1903, the majority of the work seen in the video apparently took place in the 1930s. Interestingly, it is also reported that the underground mining here was done by hand and without the assistance of machinery! It is not clear if this is because the mining operation was on a tight budget or not, but the miners certainly must have been in good shape to carve out the shafts, drifts and cross-cuts in that manner. The primary minerals extracted from this lode mine were gold and silver, but copper and lead were found here as well. The vein the miners were following was reported to be of “high-grade” quality. A bonus to this mine (aside from the underground time and the amazing views) are the abundance of wild burros and wild horses to be found in the area. We saw multiple small herds of burros on the way in (they were quite curious about us) and one small herd of wild horses. On the drive in, we also spotted a magnificent stallion standing on the ridge behind the mine, motionless and allowing the wind to wash over him. He was on a high point of the ridge, as if surveying his domain across the expanse below. He stood there, perfectly still, for almost an hour before we glanced up again and he was gone. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 7612 TVR Exploring
A Deep Mine In The Nevada Desert – Part 2 of 2
 
21:56
This abandoned mine has some of the best miner’s graffiti I have ever come across in our many mine explores... Although we see the aftermath of the miner’s work in these videos and often see the equipment they mined with, it isn’t often that we get an insight into the personalities and personal lives of the miners. However, this graffiti allows us to connect with them across time and distance. Many, if not all, of them are likely no longer in the land of the living. So, this allows us to see and to feel what once was… As you can see from the range of dates, mining took place here for a while. How about those very fully loaded ore chutes at the far end of the main adit? I could almost feel the pressure inside the adit of those tons of rocks straining the wood to its limits. It really seemed like those ore chutes could pop at almost any time. And, as you saw, my forward progress was blocked by the rubble that spilled into the adit from one of the chutes that failed. It made me wonder how much farther the drift continued past that collapsed ore chute? Did it perhaps connect to that deep cut we saw in the first video? The portal I examined at the end of the video (when I got back outside and climbed up to the top of the hill) appears to date from the same time as the first part of the mine we explored (the deep cut in the first video) or the incline my exploring buddy located near the remains of those stone buildings (also in the first video in this series). ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 27555 TVR Exploring
Underground Mining - Vale - Our People
 
03:24
Canada and global mining industry This is one of a series of videos I edited for Vale. The producer I worked for travelled to many locations around the world. Shots were taken in the air, on the ground, deep underground, and on water, during summer and winter.
Views: 187 FluidDigitalPro
Gold Mining On The Yuba River
 
09:20
Gold Mining On The Yuba River The Ancient American River, Ancient Yuba River, Ancient Calaveras River, Ancient Mokelumne River, Ancient Tuolumne River, Ancient Magalia Channel, Ancient Intervolcanic Cateract Channel, Ancient Intervolcanic American River and the Ancient Jura River (from the Jurassic Period), are plotted in detail on Big Tens California Gold Map 5. The present-day rivers bearing the same names as their ancient rivers are also shown. The Ancient Rivers of Gold in northern California are from the Tertiary Period. The Tertiary rivers existed millions of years ago and many of them had large quantities of gold within their gravels. Because of that, they are known as the "Ancient Rivers of Gold." Each ancient river is discussed below. Information on this page is based on the classic work of Waldemar Lindgren of the United States Geological Survey and by study of Big Tens California Gold Map 5, which shows the relationship of the ancient rivers to landmarks, such as roads, creeks and towns in the region. These now-dry Tertiary rivers are thought to be a prime source of the gold found in many of the rivers and streams of the Mother Lode region of northern California. The ancient rivers are discontinuous and sometimes follow tortuous routes. They have been altered by volcanic activity, erosion, and in some instances portions of the rivers have been covered by lava. Much of the region underwent extreme volcanic eruptions. Volcanic flows have been found up to 4,000 feet deep. Volcanic flows were up to 60 miles in length. Portions of an ancient river may be found at ground level or near the top of a mountain, or on the side of a mountain, or buried. Early prospectors found portions of the ancient rivers and worked them for their rich gold content. Later, mining companies used hydraulic mining or drift mining techniques to recover the gold. In hydraulic mining, water under pressure is directed to, for example, the side of a ravine to dislodge the gravels and send the material to the sluices where the gold is recovered. The equipment that was used (called a "monitor" or "giant") was similar to a very large hose nozzle. Geologic reports speak of gravel deposits up to 250 feet deep with gold deposits interspersed at various levels within the gravels. Some of the gravels of the ancient rivers of gold have been cemented together over time. Smaller materials between the larger gravels have bound the larger gravels together. Drift mining is used in those instances to follow the channel underneath the volcanic covering. In drift mining, tunnels are driven in bedrock underneath the channels and when the channels are reached, the richest stratum, resting immediately on the bedrock, is extracted by underground mining methods and then washed at the mouth of the tunnel. Many miles of the ancient rivers are still un-worked and may be very rich in gold.
Views: 318936 wheresblair
Exploring The Abandoned Coyote Mesa Mine - Part 1 of 2
 
22:07
According to my research, this was a tungsten mine (of which there were many in the area) and came into existence during World War II as a result of the American government’s insatiable demand for tungsten. The military application of tungsten comes from how dense and hard the mineral is. Given these properties, it shows up in places like missiles and grenades. Germany used tungsten during World War II to produce armor-piercing projectiles for anti-tank weapons. The tungsten allowed for a high muzzle velocity and, therefore, even small caliber weapons and light field artillery could still be devastatingly effective. I started at the top with this abandoned mine and worked down because I hiked up to figure out what that ore chute on the side of the hill was. Now that I know what it is though, it just raises even more questions. What the hell was it doing just hanging out on the side of the hill like that? Oh well, I guess we can’t figure out all of life’s mysteries, can we? This was a fun abandoned mine to explore… It had multiple drift levels and lots of twists and turns inside that were filled with interesting features. Plus it was dry, which is one of the most attractive features of desert mines! As mentioned in the video, we will cover the other side of the hill in the second video. The additional workings on the other side are part of the same mine. However, the two sides do not connect underground. Each side is independent of the other. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 19578 TVR Exploring
CRAZY GOLD FINDS !!! Underground . ask Jeff Williams
 
15:32
Driving a Drift Tunnel to get Gold.....PLUS Caves underground in our Drift mine. Monster Gold Nuggets found in Ancient stream Gravels. https://www.patreon.com/askJeffWilliams Hey everybody, we are driving our upper drift tunnel into a new section to find even more Gold Nuggets.....can't wait to see what is in there..... .PLUS we have found more Monster Gold Nuggets in the lower pockets of the mine and we have a BIG announcement .... We have a NEW Book available that has all of me and Slims combined years of Secrets and Knowledge inside.....but there are a limited amount of them so you might want to get one before they are all gone.... and they are only available to our Premium Patrons...... If you are not already one and would like to sign up then just click the link and make a $10 dollar pledge and you are in like Flynn..... So you know what I am gonna say ..huh So C'mon...Let's Go !!!!!! https://www.patreon.com/askJeffWilliams
Views: 19381 Ask Jeff Williams

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