Home
Search results “Macc ladder cripples and rejects”
South Park - Butters' Bottom Bitch - "Don't You Want a New Lunchbox?"
 
01:47
Butters gets his pimp on in this fan-favorite episode “Butters’ Bottom Bitch”. Watch full episodes of South Park for FREE here: http://southpark.cc.com/
Views: 4693604 South Park Studios
JOKE'S ON YOU! | Batman: The Enemy Within - Episode 5 (FINALE)
 
01:55:44
The joke's on you because the finale of Batman Enemy Within starts now! Series Playlist ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSYJDcRt_Kw&list=PLMBYlcH3smRzdVbspDFJxtoECSgko3Rg1 ►Twitter : https://twitter.com/Jack_Septic_Eye ►Instagram: http://instagram.com/jacksepticeye Game Link ► http://store.steampowered.com/app/675260/Batman_The_Enemy_Within__The_Telltale_Series/ Edited by Pixlpit: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHsjBlPYou_k7FgMKLCo5JA Outro animation created by Pixlpit: https://www.youtube.com/user/Pixlpit Outro Song created by "Teknoaxe". It's called "I'm everywhere" and you can listen to it here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPtNBwMIQ9Q
Views: 1402983 jacksepticeye
A Live Experiment in Empathy with Basim Razzo
 
01:30:30
6:14 is when the class begins This is a conversation with Basim Razzo, a Soc 119 friend who is visiting from Iraq and has a story to share about empathy. Tuesdays and Thursdays @ 3:05pm we live stream Soc 119, an innovative Sociology course taught by Dr. Sam Richards at The Pennsylvania State University. Sam creates an engaging participatory classroom environment to allow students from every background to step into worlds other than their own. He also invites YOU to join in from wherever you are and he welcomes your personal viewpoint. Feel free to participate in the chat space and interact with students in the classroom by using the #soc119 hashtag on Twitter. But please be kind. Remember, this is a classroom. If we show a video in class, we'll post the link in the live stream chat space. Did you watch an ad before today’s video? That’s because our YouTube channel is partnered! But don’t worry because we are not trying to make millions on YouTube. Find out why we monetize our videos here: http://www.soc119.org/partnership www.soc119.org
Views: 2208 SOC 119
Bloodlusting Mind
 
02:14
Debut video release from Ottawa industrial rock artist Psychic Vampire. (2007)
Views: 692 CrippleMcReject
2/20/13: White House Press Briefing
 
56:06
White House Press Briefings are conducted most weekdays from the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing.
Views: 2500 The Obama White House
TransformHER Conference LiveStream
 
06:41:47
TransformHER is the premier conference presenting a forum for professional Black & Latina Women in technology to build stronger relationships & leverage resources to advance. The theme of the event focuses on Up-Leveling Self, Industry, and Society.
Views: 2740 LinkedIn
Congressman Paul Ryan Makes Case for Budget During Georgetown Lecture
 
56:59
REP. PAUL RYAN (R-WIS.), chair of the House Budget Committee, addressed a Georgetown audience this morning as the speaker for Georgetown Public Policy Institute's annual Whittington Lecture.
Views: 1422 Georgetown University
The Woodlanders by Thomas Hardy | Full Audiobook with subtitles | Part 1 of 2
 
06:45:15
The Woodlanders is one of Hardy's later novels, although he originally intended it as a successor to Far From The Madding Crowd. It concerns the life and loves of Giles Winterborne, Grace Melbury, Edred Fitzpiers, Felice Charmond and Marty South. The topics of class, fidelity and loyalty are dealt with in Hardy's exquisite style and set in the beautiful woodlands of Hintock (T.Hynes) The Woodlanders (version 2) Thomas HARDY Genre(s): Romance, Published 1800 -1900 Audio Book Audiobooks All Rights Reserved. This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
Calling All Cars: Curiosity Killed a Cat / Death Is Box Office / Dr. Nitro
 
01:27:39
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 97437 Remember This
My Friend Irma: Psycholo / Newspaper Column / Dictation System
 
01:26:06
My Friend Irma, created by writer-director-producer Cy Howard, is a top-rated, long-run radio situation comedy, so popular in the late 1940s that its success escalated to films, television, a comic strip and a comic book, while Howard scored with another radio comedy hit, Life with Luigi. Marie Wilson portrayed the title character, Irma Peterson, on radio, in two films and a television series. The radio series was broadcast from April 11, 1947 to August 23, 1954. Dependable, level-headed Jane Stacy (Cathy Lewis, Diana Lynn) began each weekly radio program by narrating a misadventure of her innocent, bewildered roommate, Irma, a dim-bulb stenographer from Minnesota. The two central characters were in their mid-twenties. Irma had her 25th birthday in one episode; she was born on May 5. After the two met in the first episode, they lived together in an apartment rented from their Irish landlady, Mrs. O'Reilly (Jane Morgan, Gloria Gordon). Irma's boyfriend Al (John Brown) was a deadbeat, barely on the right side of the law, who had not held a job in years. Only someone like Irma could love Al, whose nickname for Irma was "Chicken". Al had many crazy get-rich-quick schemes, which never worked. Al planned to marry Irma at some future date so she could support him. Professor Kropotkin (Hans Conried), the Russian violinist at the Princess Burlesque theater, lived upstairs. He greeted Jane and Irma with remarks like, "My two little bunnies with one being an Easter bunny and the other being Bugs Bunny." The Professor insulted Mrs. O'Reilly, complained about his room and reluctantly became O'Reilly's love interest in an effort to make her forget his back rent. Irma worked for the lawyer, Mr. Clyde (Alan Reed). She had such an odd filing system that once when Clyde fired her, he had to hire her back again because he couldn't find anything. Useless at dictation, Irma mangled whatever Clyde dictated. Asked how long she had been with Clyde, Irma said, "When I first went to work with him he had curly black hair, then it got grey, and now it's snow white. I guess I've been with him about six months." Irma became less bright as the program evolved. She also developed a tendency to whine or cry whenever something went wrong, which was at least once every show. Jane had a romantic inclination for her boss, millionaire Richard Rhinelander (Leif Erickson), but he had no real interest in her. Another actor in the show was Bea Benaderet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Friend_Irma_%28radio-TV%29 Katherine Elisabeth Wilson (August 19, 1916 -- November 23, 1972), better known by her stage name, Marie Wilson, was an American radio, film, and television actress. She may be best remembered as the title character in My Friend Irma. Born in Anaheim, California, Wilson began her career in New York City as a dancer on the Broadway stage. She gained national prominence with My Friend Irma on radio, television and film. The show made her a star but typecast her almost interminably as the quintessential dumb blonde, which she played in numerous comedies and in Ken Murray's famous Hollywood "Blackouts". During World War II, she was a volunteer performer at the Hollywood Canteen. She was also a popular wartime pin-up. Wilson's performance in Satan Met a Lady, the second film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's detective novel The Maltese Falcon, is a virtual template for Marilyn Monroe's later onscreen persona. Wilson appeared in more than 40 films and was a guest on The Ed Sullivan Show on four occasions. She was a television performer during the 1960s, working until her untimely death. Wilson's talents have been recognized with three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: for radio at 6301 Hollywood Boulevard, for television at 6765 Hollywood Boulevard and for movies at 6601 Hollywood Boulevard. Wilson married four times: Nick Grinde (early 1930s), LA golf pro Bob Stevens (1938--39), Allan Nixon (1942--50) and Robert Fallon (1951--72). She died of cancer in 1972 at age 56 and was interred in the Columbarium of Remembrance at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Hollywood Hills. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Wilson_%28American_actress%29
Views: 294699 Remember This
The War of the Worlds By H.G. Wells - Full Audiobook
 
06:35:50
With H.G. Wells’ other novels, The War of the Worlds was one of the first and greatest works of science fiction ever to be written. Even long before man had learned to fly, H.G. Wells wrote this story of the Martian attack on England. These unearthly creatures arrive in huge cylinders, from which they escape as soon as the metal is cool. The first falls near Woking and is regarded as a curiosity rather than a danger until the Martians climb out of it and kill many of the gaping crowd with a Heat-Ray. These unearthly creatures have heads four feet in diameter and colossal round bodies, and by manipulating two terrifying machines – the Handling Machine and the Fighting Machine – they are as versatile as humans and at the same time insuperable. They cause boundless destruction. The inhabitants of the Earth are powerless against them, and it looks as if the end of the World has come. But there is one factor which the Martians, in spite of their superior intelligence, have not reckoned on. It is this which brings about a miraculous conclusion to this famous work of the imagination. Author: H.G.Wells Read along with the narrator using closed captions Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8909.The_War_of_the_Worlds 01 Book 1 Chapter 01 00:00:00 02 Book 1 Chapter 02 00:15:39 03 Book 1 Chapter 03 00:25:06 04 Book 1 Chapter 04 00:32:02 05 Book 1 Chapter 05 00:40:01 06 Book 1 Chapter 06 00:50:16 07 Book 1 Chapter 07 00:56:12 08 Book 1 Chapter 08 01:05:05 09 Book 1 Chapter 09 01:11:58 10 Book 1 Chapter 10 01:25:03 11 Book 1 Chapter 11 01:39:13 12 Book 1 Chapter 12 01:52:01 13 Book 1 Chapter 13 02:15:36 14 Book 1 Chapter 14 02:28:08 15 Book 1 Chapter 15 02:52:13 16 Book 1 Chapter 16 03:11:28 17 Book 1 Chapter 17 03:39:42 18 Book 2 Chapter 01 04:01:55 19 Book 2 Chapter 02 04:18:48 20 Book 2 Chapter 03 04:40:57 21 Book 2 Chapter 04 04:53:42 22 Book 2 Chapter 05 05:04:40 23 Book 2 Chapter 06 05:11:29 24 Book 2 Chapter 07 05:20:05 25 Book 2 Chapter 08 05:54:17 26 Book 2 Chapter 09 06:14:49 27 Book 2 Chapter 10 06:26:45
09/20/18 Zoning Appeals Board Meeting
 
02:26:10
Coverage of the Board of Zoning Appeals held September 20, 2018
Views: 136 MetroNashville
Calling All Cars: Invitation to Murder / Bank Bandits and Bullets / Burglar Charges Collect
 
01:28:24
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 36534 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Gildy's New Flame / Marjorie's Babysitting Assignment / Congressman
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 110082 Remember This