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Mexico Mines#2 El Pilon
 
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Travel back hundreds of years in time to the mines of El Pilon where men still mine for Gold with traditional practices used hundreds of years ago. They mined Gold using donkeys and Mercury. Also we see huge spiders and hundreds of bats.
Mexico Mines#4 Busted in a mine
 
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I visit a large active mine in Zacatecas Mexico owned by Capstone a Canadian mining company and get caught in there without permission. I also visit a modern operating mill producing Silver.
Ropes take us down more big old  Mines In Mexico Part 3
 
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Third installment in a 5 part series exploring old abandoned mines in Mexico. We use ropes to travel down steep shafts, inclined shafts and explore underground railways abandoned long ago!
We Found An Abandoned Town Hidden in the Arizona Mountains.
 
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This was probably my favorite place to explore ever. Hidden in the Arizona mountains sets Ruby, AZ the most well preserved ghost towns to exist.Also i hate that i must say this however the town was abandoned in the 40's but it was founded over 150 years ago making a 200 + year old town. So before you comment understand that. Subscribe to Tim. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKRhTLMBV6dU74IvbO8SEJw patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4575018 spreadshirt: https://www.spreadshirt.com/user/301932432 Mail: P.O. Box 71031 Knoxville, TN 37938 Professional Inquires: [email protected] instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Exploration__Unknown/ twitter: https://twitter.com/explor8tion1 facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/134993677132723
Views: 1591900 Exploration Unknown
Silver Mining Town Sold For $1.4 MIllion!
 
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Donate: https://www.paypal.me/SalivateMetal Merchandise:https://teespring.com/stores/salivate-metal Buy Salivate Metal rounds here: http://qualitysilverbullion.com/product-category/salivate-metal/ Bitcoin:14RZD6XGGv4RFMyTTbPndmuYBWTc5w1Sm6 Ethereum:0x98E741Abf6D70ed1e6b3C97203a1B72414F1D6ad Litecoin:LfgL5D7Wvtknagbn2WuCcXasAfquzv2CGB
Views: 916 SalivateMetal
Travel Guide New Mexico tm Ghost Towns New Mexico
 
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The Land of Enchantment still echos with voices from its colorful past. These voices speak especially clearly from the ghost towns, mining camps, and little-known places that populate New Mexico's landscape. New Mexico's story is rich with history, from the Ancient Puebloan Indians, to Spanish explorers, pioneers traveling along the Santa Fe Trail, and prospectors in the 19th century. These many folks left their "footprints," not only along the many old trails in the "Land of Enchantment," but also on the many ruins and ghost towns that remain. Cuchillo, established by ranchers and farmers in the 1850s, was named for a nearby creek and a local Apache chief, Cuchillo Negro (Black Knife). Midway between the mines at Chloride and Winston and the railroad at Engle, it flourished as a stage stop and trade center from the 1880s to the 1930s. Charming original buildings still stand, including the Cuchillo Bar and Store, and San Jose Catholic Church, built in 1907 Chloride was founded in 1880. Englishman Harry Pye had discovered silver ore there in the late 1870s, and soon after Pye was killed by Apaches, word of the silver find got out. Despite the threat of Indian attacks Chloride grew to over 3,000 people. In its heyday it had nine saloons, a general store, a dry goods store, a millinery shop, a restaurant, a butcher shop, a candy store, a pharmacy, a Chinese laundry, a photography studio, a school, and two hotels. The Black Range newspaper was printed in Chloride from 1882 to 1896. Of the nearly 500 surveyed mines and prospect holes in the Apache Mining District, a dozen or so made big mines, including the Silver Monument, the U.S. Treasury, and the St. Cloud, which is still in operation, though not mining silver. The demise of Chloride began with the Silver Panic of 1893 and was hastened by the presidential election of 1896, which resulted in a drastic decline in silver prices. Many of Chloride's original structures still stand. The old Pioneer Store is now a museum; next door the former Monte Cristo Saloon and Dance Hall houses a gift shop and gallery featuring work by local artists. Both are open seven days a week from 10am-4pm. Harry Pye's cabin is available as a vacation rental. Other landmarks in this tiny town (population 11) include the 200-year-old Hanging Tree and Doodle Dum, the workshop of longtime resident Cassie Hobbs (19041989). Hillsboro was born in 1877 when gold was found at the nearby Opportunity and Ready Pay mines. Despite fierce Indian attacks, the town grew, becoming the county seat in 1884. Area mines produced more than $6 million in gold and silver, and by 1907 the town had a population of 1,200. Today, this charming, peaceful village of a hundred souls, which boasts flower-filled yards and old cottonwoods lining the main street, offers many enticements, including gift shops; restaurants; artist studios and galleries; the remains of the old county courthouse; the Black Range Museum; Union Church; and Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church. Hillsboros Heritage Day is held annually on the day before Mother's Day. Kingston was founded when a rich lode of silver ore was discovered at the Solitaire in 1882. It grew rapidly and was the largest town in the territory—and one of the wildest in the Wild West. The town soon offered all of the trappings of civilization and culture. Numerous hotels played host to the likes of Mark Twain, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and Black Jack Ketchum. Stage lines served all major routes, and the town supported twenty-three saloons,some of which advertised fresh oysters 24 hours a day! The town also had 14 grocery and general stores; a brewery; three newspapers; and an Opera House where the Lillian Russell Troupe once performed. Albert Bacon Fall and Ed Doheny of the Teapot Dome Scandal got their start in Kingston. From those glory days, the old Assay Office and the remains of the Victorio Hotel have been renovated as private residences. The Black Range Lodge, a bed and breakfast, offers accommodations in a setting of massive stonewalls and log-beamed ceilings constructed from the ruins of what once was Pretty Sam's Casino. Some Kingston residents offer straw-bale and natural building workshops
Views: 59524 TravelGuideNewMexico
Anyox part 2 Canada's largest Ghost Town!
 
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The second of our series visiting the remains of the town, smelter and forgotten mine at Anyox. Once a bustling town of 3,000 people the mine closed in 1935 and it is now completely abandoned. Visit a massive rock crusher still underground, fly over the site with a drone and visit the cemetery with us.
How cobalt has a small Ontario town dreaming of boom times once again
 
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A small northern Ontario town may soon become extremely important to the increasingly battery-powered world. Abandoned silver mines in Cobalt, Ont., could mean a boom for the once-thriving mining town as battery demand prompts a cobalt rush. Welcome to The National, the flagship nightly newscast of CBC News »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/CBCTheNational?sub_confirmation=1 Voice Your Opinion & Connect With Us Online: The National Updates on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenational The National Updates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» The National is CBC Television's flagship news program. Airing six days a week, the show delivers news, feature documentaries and analysis from some of Canada's leading journalists.
Exploring abandoned silver mine 500'  level
 
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Old abandoned silver mine with lots of equipment Left Behind
Views: 8426 Mine Explorers
Visit to a Silver factory in Acapulco
 
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Taxco, Mexico's silver mining town is located a two hours drive from Acapulco October 3rd 2005
Views: 53 Peter Laurence
🇲🇽REAL DE CATORCE, SAN LUIS POTOSÍ, MEXICO | The SPECTACULAR MEXICAN GHOST TOWN | MEXICO TRAVEL
 
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REAL DE CATORCE, SAN LUIS POTOSI, MEXICO - Hola amigos! We have finally made it to the former silver mining town of Real de Catorce in the state of San Luis Potosi in Mexico! This is a feature length video detailing a location which gives you an authentic feel of the Mexican desert. If you'e planning a Mexico trip or Mexico vacation in 2019, San Luis Potosi and Real de Catorce have to be on your itinerary! Real de Catorce is located approx 2700 metres above sea level north of Matehuala in San Luis Potosi state. It rose to prominence in the late 1700s when silver was discovered, which became the main industry in the area. Once the early 1900s came, the price of silver had plummeted, resulting in the town being largely abandoned. You can visit Real de Catorce on a tour/bus from San Luis Potosi or Matehuala or do it yourself as I did (My Airbnb host in Cedral drove me). There is a bus back at 1540 and at other times throughout the day (you get a small bus through the Ogarrio tunnel then change to a Grupo Senda bus to Matehuala). You can also visit the ghost town higher up by horse, or (As I did), walk! It takes about 1-1.5hrs depending on fitness. WIND - Yes there is wind in the video (I was at 3000 metres), please put the subtitles on if you can't hear. MUSIC - "Distant Echo" - Jakob Ahlbom (Intro and Outro) "Breaking of Dawn 4" - Stefan Mothender (Exploring section) "I Promise You" - Johannes Bornlof (Cemetary and Church scenes) "Cinematic Introductions 4" - Magnus Ringblom (Ghost Town Trek) ALL MUSIC FROM EPIDEMIC SOUND 🔴INFO - PLAYLISTS🔴 🔹Check out my Mexico Playlist including videos from Teotihuacan, Chichen Itza, Isla Holbox and so many areas of Mexico City! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoj_p-4xXUCsAW2ZG5Up3iwdsFzMYYgMi Thanks for Watching! The aim of The Tao of David (formerly First World Traveller) is to provide an honest (sometimes brutally honest) take on the Travel and Digital Nomad world which is often missing from Travel YouTube channels. I provide useful information on Long Term Travel, Solo Travel, Digital Nomad Life, Things to Do, City Basics and finally to be a role model for anyone looking to pursue a similar life, devoid of society's expectations! 🔹Don't forget to like my Instagram at the link below. Check out my Instagram - tao.of.david or https://www.instagram.com/tao.of.david/ 🔹Thankyou to my Patrons Hidhir, Tim, Cynthie, Ian, Laura, Melvin, David, Manuel, George, Shirley, Tracy, Daniel, David, Wendy, Jose, Randall, Momo, Silas & Amarra for supporting me on my journey. 🔹If you would like to become a Patron, check out the link below - https://www.patreon.com/Firstworldtraveller 🔹You can also donate via Paypal - https://paypal.me/pools/campaign/110101740036663020 💲💲SAVE MONEY!💲💲 🔶Get £25GBP off your first stay with Airbnb! - http://www.airbnb.com/c/davido7156 🔶Get £15GBP off your first Booking.com booking - https://booking.com/s/1c182e16 🔶Get 15% off orders at www.travelmotto.com by using discount code TAODAVID15 🔶Get $10USD in Italki Credits by visiting - https://go.italki.com/firstworldtraveller Thanks for Watching! 🔹What do I film with? Samsung J7 Nero DJI Osmo Mobile 1 Stabilizer Wondershare Filmora9 Remember to like, leave a comment, share on your social media and it would be great if you could subscribe! Hit the little bell to get a notification on your phone when I upload a new video! Thankyou! 😎Business e-mail - For Accommodation Reviews, Product Reviews, Sponsored Videos, Tour Company Reviews, Collaborations and more please contact me at [email protected] #realdecatorce #travelmexico #sanluispotosi -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "🇲🇽 ZACATECAS, MEXICO | DAVID and the GREAT GLASS TELEFERICO! | CERRO de la BUFA | ZACATECAS PART 1" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ea0rR0xaXh4 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 10250 Tao of David
Klondyke Ghost Town | Silver Mining Town | Graham County | Arizona | USA | HD
 
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Klondyke is a populated place in Graham County, Arizona, that was founded around 1900 by some miners who had recently returned from Alaska after participating in the Klondike Gold Rush. The town is located west of Safford in the Aravaipa Valley. The Galiuro Mountains lie to the southeast and the Santa Teresa Mountains to the north. POPULATION 50. Klondyke Website | https://www.visitarizona.com/cities/tucson-and-southern/klondyke/ Klondyke Gold Rush | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klondike_Gold_Rush Klondyke | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klondyke,_Arizona Twitter | https://twitter.com/USAGhostTowns Tumblr | https://ameicanghosttowns.tumblr.com/ About my Channel. Welcome to my channel, the OFFICIAL home of American Ghost Towns, I make video's about Ghost Towns in America and other parts of the world, with the HISTORY and FACTS about these towns. Also video's about Travel and People. Don't Forget to Like, Share and Subscribe Here | https://www.youtube.com/c/AmericanGho... Thanks for visiting. #Klondyke #Arizona #AmericanGhostTowns
Views: 7094 American Ghost Towns
New Mexico's Turquoise Trail
 
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Explore three significant and historical town on the Turquoise Trail of New Mexico - Cerrillos, Madrid and Golden. Each offers a glimpse into the heady days when mining for gold, silver and other precious metals, as well as hard and soft coal, made this region wealthy. Today, each is virtually forgotten, although not officially ghost towns. Madrid is being resurrected as an artists' colony; Cerrillos is still a little sleepy village;; Golden, with only 10 families, is but a blip on the map.
Views: 69007 Edward Rozylowicz
Real del Monte - Mexicos silver mining town
 
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A day trip around Pachuca the blog entry about my stays abroad: http://divingintotheworld.travellerspoint.com/
Views: 37 chinacetacean
Canadian mine digs up gold, Mexican town digs up bodies
 
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Shootings, extortion and kidnappings have come along the wealth brought by Canadian mines in impoverished Mexican Guerrero State, its inhabitants say.
Views: 623 AFP news agency
"El Triunfo, old silver mining town" Leggesnbaja09's photos around El Triunfo, Mexico (slideshow)
 
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Preview of Leggesnbaja09's blog at TravelPod. Read the full blog here: http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/leggesnbaja09/1/1239751083/tpod.html This blog preview was made by TravelPod using the TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow creator. Learn more about these videos: http://www.travelpod.com/help/faq#youtube
Views: 344 TripAdvisorTRIPWOWu
Big problems in Cartel controled areas while exploring mines in Mexico.
 
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I end up stranded in a cartel controlled region of Mexico in Sinoloa where tourists are not permitted when my vehicle breaks down while looking for abandoned mines.
mexican silver
 
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The Best Mexican Silver Jewelry from Taxco http://ebaplata.com/mexican-silver-jewelry-taxco.html If you are looking for silver jewelry form Taxco, Mexico you are about to be in for a treat. Best handmade quality, world reknown and special collections such as Frida Khalo Jewelry. Mexican silver jewelry is widely thought to be good quality and extremely fashionable. When thinking about your jewelry options there are many reasons to purchase gold, besides how lovely a few of the designs are. Silver jewelry from Mexico is durable and well-made. Additionally it is the shiniest of all of the gold and silver coins. Many people have chosen silver plate because of their jewelry as a consequence of the amount it reflects the lighting and catches the eye. After a while the need for sterling silver has risen, as has it's popularity. Because of this rise in popularity the amount of producers who assist it has risen also, especially within Mexico. Taxco Mexico Silver Taxco, Guerrero is a popular destination that is famed for the amazing silver plate. This really is partially because of the fact there would be a large mining operation that harvests silver from the earth around the outskirts of the town. Silver Jewelry from Taxco Mexico Mexican Taxco Silver Jewelry, is usually of the most useful and magnificence. Many high-fashion jewelry companies have followed the buzz of developing their goods with gold, a thing that Taxco is doing for several years. Mexican Silver Jewelry Latest Fashions As the every changing fashion world is maintaining growth, people continue buying silver plate not simply because of its great value, however it%u2019s great look. Every one of the new kinds of jewelry obtainable in sterling silver could be traced that because it's affordable both producers and consumers have started voraciously making and acquiring products made out of it. Taxco features a long standing relationship using the sterling silver trade, these types of this, it is one of the absolute the best places to purchase high-end, high-fashion- jewelry in the world.
Views: 80 Liam Hodges
Visit of the silver mine of Potosi
 
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Visite de Potosi (Bolivie) et de sa mine d'argent, In der Silberminen von Potosi (Bolivia) , Potosi (Bolivia), las minas de plata Potosí is a city, the capital of the department of Potosí in Bolivia. It is at an altitude of 3967 meters and has about 115,000 inhabitants. It is claimed to be the highest city in the world. It lies beneath the Cerro Rico ("Rich mountain"), a mountain of silver ore, which has always dominated the city. Founded 1546 as a mining town, it soon produced fabulous wealth, becoming the largest city in the Americas (except for Mexico City) with a population exceeding 200,000 people. In Spanish there is still a saying "vale un Potosí" meaning "worth a fortune" and, for Europeans, "Perú"—Bolivia was part of the Viceroyalty of Perú and was known as Alto Perú before becoming independent— was a mythical land of riches. Potosí is the only American city mentioned in Miguel de Cervantes's famous novel satirizing chivalry, Don Quixote, with clear reference to its riches. It is from Potosí that most of the Spanish silver came. Indian labour, forced by Francisco de Toledo, Count of Oropesa through the traditional Incan mita institution of contributed labor, came to die by the thousands, not simply from exposure and brutal labor, but by mercury poisoning: in the paved patio the silver-ore, having been crushed to powder by hydraulic machinery, was cold-mixed with mercury and trodden to an amalgam by the native workers with their bare feet. [1] The mercury was then driven off by heating, producing deadly vapors. After 1800 the silver mines became depleted, making tin the main product. This eventually led to a slow economic decline. Still, the mountain continues to be mined for silver to this day. Due to poor worker conditions (lack of protective equipment from the constant inhalation of dust), the miners still have a short life expectancy with most of them contracting silicosis and dying around 40 years of age. It is estimated that, in the past years of Incan labour, roughly 8 million indians died "eaten" by the Rich Hill. During the War of Independence (1809--1825, see History of Bolivia) Potosi frequently passed between the control of Royalist and Patriot forces. Major blunders by the First Argentine Auxiliary Army (under the command of Juan José Castelli) led to an increased sense that independence was needed and fostered resentment towards Argentina. During that occupation there was anarchy and martial excess, and Potosi became unfriendly to the point where it could not be defended. When the second auxiliary army arrived it was received well, and the commander, Manuel Belgrano did much to heal the past wounds inflicted by the tyrannical minded Castelli. When that army was forced to retreat, Belgrano took the calculated decision to blow up the Casa de Moneda. Since the locals refused to evacuate this explosion would have resulted in many casualties, but by then the fuse was already lit. Disaster was averted not by the Argentinians who at that time were fleeing, but by locals who put the fuse out. In one stroke the good feelings Belgrano delicately built were destroyed. Two more expeditions from Argentina would seize Potosi. (wikipedia) 08.1999 VALPARD FILMS http://valpardfilms.free.f
Views: 14347 valpard
Mexico Vlog: Day 4
 
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Day 4 constitutes the exploration of the small cities surrounding Mexico City: Cuernavaca and Taxco.The ancient silver-mining town of Taxco, in particular, was breathtaking. Scattered down a precipitous hillside surrounded by dramatic mountains and cliffs, its perfectly preserved colonial architecture and the twin belfries of its baroque masterpiece, Templo de Santa Prisca, make for one of the most beguiling views anywhere in the central highlands. The video hardly does the town justice. It was a magical experience; I felt like walking straight into a picture book. P.S.: Since it is Holy Week, we were lucky enough to see the Holy Week procession, captured some on video for the curious :)
Views: 535 sonia kurniawan
TOURING SILVER MINES IN BOLIVIA
 
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http://www.backpackingstories.com After Sucre, we headed on a four-hour trip down to Potosi, Bolivia where the town is famous for the silver mining tours! We booked our mining tour with a company called 'The Big Deal' that is run by a few ex-miners and would completely recommend this tour group. We take you along with us on a tour to the famous Cerro Rico Mountain or called "Rich Mountain". Potosi was once a major hub for the supply of silver for Spain during the period of the New World Spanish Empire. They were one of the richest cities in the world 500 years ago. Learn more about the silver mines here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potos%C3%AD Great town for a 1-2 day stopover on your way down to Uyuni from Sucre! Discount Travel Codes! Use them for your next adventure! https://www.airbnb.com/c/mariam25403 https://www.booking.com/s/0b3febf4 Products I use --Equipment-- - Canon G9x http://amzn.to/2s20rg8 - GoPro Hero+ http://amzn.to/2shYEb6 - Socks http://amzn.to/2tpmYYC http://amzn.to/2si1UD4 - Clothes Organization Cube Set http://amzn.to/2smKpg6 - Keen Sandals http://amzn.to/2si28Kq - REI Co-op USB Multination Travel Adapter Plug http://goo.gl/zM9Aa9 - REI Co-op RFID Money Belt http://goo.gl/6Z98nZ - Lowa Renegade GTX Mid Hiking Boots http://amzn.to/2tlcatX - REI Co-op Grand Tour 80 Travel Pack http://goo.gl/yFQeRL - Grand Trunk Beach Blanket http://amzn.to/2tpm1Q5 https://www.instagram.com/gofindmaria/ Songs Credited To Johan Lilja - All the colors https://theartistunion.com/tracks/4857e2 If you have any questions travel related please don't be shy to email me at [email protected]
Views: 118 Go Find Maria
Zacatecas Mexico  | Silver Mine
 
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We went to Zacatecas in Mexico what a beautiful city ! GFG Tshirts now Available !!!! SQUAD UP! http://tinyurl.com/y938pmem want to support my channel? become a GFG Hero today! https:www.patreon.com/gamersfitnessgroup Focused/Energized - HEADSHOT - http://www.opnutraceuticals.com Want to see what I'm working on Beforehand ? TwitchTv www.twitch.tv/gamersfitnessgroup Twitter @ www.twitter.com/gamersfitness Instagram @ www.instagram.com/Gamersfitnessgroup
Views: 1567 Gamers Fitness Group
Travel Taxco, Mexico - Town of Taxco
 
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Take a tour of Town of Taxco in Mexico -- part of the World's Greatest Attractions travel video series by GeoBeats. The town of Taxco is nestled in the rolling hills of Guerrero, Mexico. Its full name, Taxco de Alarcón, is to honor the native son and writer Juan Ruiz de Alarcón. Apart from silver mining as the main source of economic income, the tourism of this town is the second main source of economy. Santa Prisca Church, located in the main plaza, is so extravagant it nearly bankrupted its builder, José de la Borda. Artisan goods can be found throughout Taxco, though they mostly take a back seat to the silver works of the town. Nearly 50,000 people live in Taxco, and lead relatively simple lives. Taxco was named one of Mexico's "Pueblos Magicos," as much for its man-made silver work as its natural surroundings.
Views: 5830 geobeats
Shakespeare Ghost Town | Historic Silver Mining Town | New Mexico | USA | HD
 
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Shakespeare is a ghost town in Hidalgo County, New Mexico, United States. It is currently part of a privately owned ranch, sometimes open to tourists. The entire community was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. Shakespeare | http://www.shakespeareghostown.com/ Shakespeare | New Mexico - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare,_New_Mexico Twitter | https://twitter.com/USAGhostTowns Tumblr | https://ameicanghosttowns.tumblr.com/ About my Channel. Welcome to my channel, the OFFICIAL home of American Ghost Towns, I make video's about Ghost Towns in America and other parts of the world, with the HISTORY and FACTS about these towns. Also video's about Travel and People. Don't Forget to Like, Share and Subscribe Here | https://www.youtube.com/c/AmericanGho... Thanks for visiting. #ShakespeareGhostTown #NewMexico #AmericanGhostTowns #GhostTowns #Abandoned #GhostTown
Views: 4526 American Ghost Towns
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine - Part 3
 
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Given what a labyrinth this mine is, I thought it would be useful to use that deep winze (or capped shaft) as a point of reference for you. This level is huge! As you can see, it has taken almost two full videos for this level alone. And it still isn’t quite finished yet! However, with the many pockets and twists and turns, it took a while for us to cover everything. Given the size of this level as well as the many ore chutes, it seems a pretty safe bet that a lot of ore was extracted from this section. It also seemed as if there was a lot of mixing of the older and newer workings on this level of the mine. In other words, it seemed as if there were a lot of sections where the miners from the 20th century punched into workings - or overlapped with workings - from the miners in the 1800s. It was somewhat difficult to tell given how many boards had come down, but I believe there is a good chance that we saw examples of square set timbering on two occasions on this level. Square set timbering is the use of what are essentially wooden cubes stacked on top of each other to fill a void or cavity. They can be used to support enormous spaces (which this mine has an abundance of). I pointed out what I thought might have been square set timbering in the video, but didn’t mention how rare it is. To put it in perspective, I’ve explored hundreds of abandoned mines now and that is the first time I have ever seen square set timbering. How about that yellow portable air compressor? At least I think that’s what it was… I love the ingenuity of miners. Every mine we go to that still has some old mining equipment around, will have a good display of unique innovations from the miners – something created on the spot that we haven’t seen anywhere else. If you’ve been enjoying this series so far, you’re going to love the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 24716 TVR Exploring
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine - Part 4
 
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Well, here it is… I’ve explored hundreds of abandoned mines now and I’ve seen some amazing things, but nothing has been as awesome for me as stepping into the bottom of that gigantic natural cavern. I will never forget that. I can only imagine what the miners thought when they first punched in to the cave and tried to gain an understanding of how huge it was with only the benefit of candles or carbide lamps. Interestingly, the reports I read on this mine indicated that the floor of this cavern was covered in staggeringly rich oxidized ore. So, the natural processes that formed the cave (presumably water passing through the mountain?) left behind a rich reward for the pioneering miners that discovered the cave. The geological features inside the cavern lead me to believe that there was a fair amount of water that flowed through despite this mine being in the desert. Pretty interesting geology, no? In a way, it is a shame that the miners were not more concerned with aesthetics because it would have been nice to see how massive the cavern was originally. However, sentimentality aside, the miners must have been delighted to fill that cavern up with waste rock rather than having to haul it all of the way outside. Everything that we were climbing around on in there was all waste rock. Does anyone disagree with me or have another idea about that unusual two-toned pile I climbed up? Given how finely ground it was, it sure looked like tailings. The miners dropped tons and tons of waste rock into the huge cavern, why not tailings from the surface as well? Even with the benefit of time, I still don’t have a better idea on that one. It's a good thing that air flowing out reminded us of that last “little” drift we hadn’t explored, wasn’t it? We were packed up and were heading out… Ha, that would have sucked to go all of the way there and to have missed that cavern!! A slight correction – in the video, I mention the collapse that we saw the other side of “in the last video.” It was actually the second video rather than the last video (that was a huge level). We’re not done with this mine yet! The fifth and final video in this series will be posted next Wednesday and there is some great stuff still to be seen. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 93847 TVR Exploring
Exploring the Bristol Silver Mines & Bristol Ghost Town
 
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Spent a day exploring the well-preserved and fascinating ghost town of Bristol and its Bristol Silver Mines. This video shows an underground exploration of one of the many mines in Bristol. Also featured are an examination of the Snyder Shaft, the hoist house, and various large pieces of mining machinery such as engines and compressors. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Chloride Ghost Town - Arizona
 
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Chloride, Arizona was founded in 1862 with the discovery of silver ore and is an old mining camp that never quite died. Silver, Gold, lead, zinc, and turquoise have been found in the area. Today some of the mines are privately owned while others are on public land. At one time there was over 72 mines operating in Chloride. The name Chloride came from the silver chloride found in the hills among other minerals in the area. Silver chloride is used in photographic emulsions and antiseptic silver solutions. Chloride is the oldest continuously inhabited mining town in the state of Arizona.
Views: 1711 Kool Buildings
Amazing discovery, town and 80 miles of tunnels in the Mascot Mine!
 
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We find the restored mine buildings of the famous Mascot Mine and the portal that joins 80 miles of tunnels connecting the Mascot with the Nickel Plate mine near Hedley BC! #hedleymine #minetours #mascotmine #abandonedmines
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine  - Part 5
 
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We’re at the end of this series now... If you’ve made it through all five of these videos, I thank you for watching and I’m going to assume that you saw why we enjoyed this abandoned mine so much. With some mines, there is a feeling of relief to get outside again into the open skies and fresh air. However, I actually find myself reluctant to leave mines such as this one or the Buca della Vena Mine in Italy. Sure, we’re usually tired after a day of scrambling through the different levels, but they are really fun to explore and after seeing so many amazing things, one is reluctant to leave the party early. As you probably gathered, this is not the last level in this mine, but this is as far as we could go on this trip. There was no way we could have gotten up those soggy, rotten ladders running up the side of that shaft or winze (I still don’t know if that was a winze or a capped shaft). You saw how many rungs were missing and by the point we arrived, those ladders were essentially mush. Speaking of rotten things… How did you like that false floor hanging out over that huge open space? I thought it was pretty cool to be able to look back on that and to see what the platform looked like underneath. It isn’t often that one is able to get a perspective like that. And I’m glad I didn’t go out on it because that would not have been a pleasant ride! I’m also glad we were able to gain additional views down into the huge cave as well. I don’t know if you noticed or not, but at one of those openings I showed down into the cave, you could see ore cart rail jutting out a little bit into the opening. That was one of the points where the miners were dumping the waste rock into the cave. As great as it was to see more of the enormous cave, I think my favorite thing on this upper level was that sign displaying the “Mine Hoist Signal Code.” It is very rare to find intact signs like that. First of all, not many mines are big enough to even have one in the first place. Secondly, the wet or flooded mines will soon cause a sign like that to rot away to nothing. And, lastly, although they might be preserved in the dry, desert mines, those are some of the first mine relics to disappear into the backpacks of “collectors.” So, it is a treat to see one still in place where it belongs. It took us a full day to explore the section of this mine that you saw in this series of five videos, but that is far from the whole mine. I’ve spoken with an individual that knows this mine very well and has seen far more of it than we have. According to him (which is supported by the maps I have seen), we saw only approximately 20% of this abandoned mine in this series. Imagine a series of 25-30 videos that it would have taken to cover this one mine! We haven’t been in many mines that are that big… Really, there aren’t many mines that ARE that big. I haven’t posted them yet, but I actually still have two mine series to publish that are also of enormous mines like this. I think you’ll like those... ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 38086 TVR Exploring
Nelson City Silver King Ice Mine...See through the floor and more!
 
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Father and son visit the historic Silver King Mine, abandoned for over 100 years and frozen in ice!
Historic Town of Guanajuato and Adjacent Mines (UNESCO/NHK)
 
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Founded by the Spanish in the early 16th century, Guanajuato became the world's leading silver-extraction centre in the 18th century. This past can be seen in its 'subterranean streets' and the 'Boca del Inferno', a mineshaft that plunges a breathtaking 600 m. The town's fine Baroque and neoclassical buildings, resulting from the prosperity of the mines, have influenced buildings throughout central Mexico. The churches of La ... Source: UNESCO TV / © NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai URL: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/482/
Views: 1949 UNESCO
Exploring Bayhorse mining ghost town
 
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Bayhorse was a town built to support the various mines in the area. Mining began to boom in the late 1870's and Bayhorse used modern technology to increase profitability of ore reduction. Named Bayhorse because a couple prospectors met a gentleman with two bay horses that told them of rich mining prospects here. In the 1890's, silver and lead prices dropped and ultimately closed this operation. The town supported 300-500 people until that time and work in these mines slowed until it closed completely some time in the early 20th century. Nearly 100,000 tons of ore had been removed from the mines here. In 2006, Bayhorse became a unit of the Idaho State Parks dept. They have done a great job of preserving this site. ---------------------------------------------------------------- Check out the Idaho State Parks page on this and other park sites https://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/land-yankee-fork Want to help me continue making these videos? Check out my Patreon page and help me go commercial free (or at least fewer commercials). https://www.patreon.com/detourswithfrank You can also check out my facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/detourswithfrank/ Or my instagram page at https://www.instagram.com/detourswithfrank/
Views: 1213 Detours with Frank
Travel Video Discover San Sebastian del Oeste Jalisco Mexico by PromovisionPV.com Video Production
 
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Travel Video Discover San Sebastian Jalisco Mexico PromovisionPV.com [email protected] Up behind Puerto Vallarta in the Sierra Madre Mountains is an old mining town that has a completely different atmosphere than Puerto Vallarta. At 4,500 ft. with pine trees, the air is crisp and clear and at night it can be quite cold. In the surrounding valley you'll find cattle, corn and coffee plantations. This local coffee is excellent and you can sample and purchase it in town. Founded in 1605, San Sebastian del Oeste was one of the gold and silver mining centers of Mexico. At one time a provincial capital of 40,000 people, you will find it strangely deserted with only about 600 people living there now. Puerto Vallarta, San Sebastian The mines were, in part, responsible for the start of Puerto Vallarta. Then know as Las Peñas and consisting of just a few huts at the mouth of the Rio Cuale, it was used to supply the mines with salt which was taken by mules up to San Sebastian and other mines in the High Sierras and used in the smelting process. The silver and gold from the mines was sent, again by mule train through Guadalajara and Mexico City to Veracruz, where it was sent, once a year, to Spain At this moment the Hacienda Jalisco is the best place to stay. A wonderful old colonial Hacienda, built 170 years ago by the Spnish, with tall ceilings and a fireplace in every room - it gets cold at night. There is no electricity, evenings are lit by oil lamps and candles, there's no telephone.
Views: 469 promovision
Salt Mines 2 | Smash Bros Melee Tournament in Mexico  beach town
 
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Beach, beers and melee for 3 days at the Salt Mines 2 Tournament! Good times on this major from México's melee scene with some of the top player of the country.
Views: 399 Dan Cordero
Travel Video Discover Talpa Jalisco Mexico by PromovisionPV.com
 
02:14
Travel Video Discover Talpa Mexico by PromovisionPV.com [email protected] Surrounded by pine covered mountains, Talpa de Allende, another silver mining town, founded by the Spanish in 1599, has a population of about 10,500 - including 9 gringos, is an important religious site in Mexico. There are 4 pilgrimages a year to see the Virgin "Rosario of Talpa", a small statue that is said to have healing powers, On these occasions the town's population triples.
Views: 1208 promovision
Mexican Gold Mining in America
 
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This video is about Mexican Gold Mining in America
Views: 105 Omar Mughal
Wellington Camp Part 1 Visit  abandoned  underground mine and ghost town near Grand Forks BC
 
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Ride up an abandoned railway to an empty ghost town called Wellington camp. Visit several abandoned Gold, Silver, Lead and Copper mines. Explore old buildings enter old mine tunnels and explore the secret world of abandoned underground mines with Frank and Max his dog.
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 3
 
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After following the drift we ended the last video with to its surprising conclusion, we started moving back toward the main hub of this enormous abandoned mine. Along the way, we explored many of the side passages and raises that were bypassed on the route in through the main haulage adit located in this part of the mine. Following the very long hike up and out of the mine, we set up our camp for the night (we spent all day underground in this mine) and then headed above the mine to see some of its more interesting features above ground. You’ll see that we explore some of the mine buildings, including one that has an amazing collection inside of it. Although I was curious about what was inside of the modern mine buildings we discovered, I also had a specific destination in mind. One of my exploring buddies – Adit Addicts – had spotted what appeared to be a steam shovel abandoned above the modern mine we explored in this video. I wanted to see this machine to confirm what it was and also to film it if it really did turn out to be a steam shovel. As with the mine itself, it was quite a hike up into the hills above it. Fortunately, I was able to find the machine (although the GPS took me on a terrible route to do so) and it was indeed a steam shovel. Sort of... It was a steam shovel at one time, but had actually been converted over to run on an internal combustion motor. I had never seen anything like that before and it was pretty amazing to see one out in the desert mountains still next to the pile of dirt it had been excavating decades ago. The modern abandoned mine featured in this video is definitely not the first mine in this area and when looking around above the mine, it was fairly common to see old collapsed adits and old surface mining work. Many of these seemed to be more exploratory in nature though. This area has historically been a large producer of ores containing lead, copper and silver and a thriving town was once supported by the mines. However, today, there is almost no trace left of the ghost town or an aerial tramway that also used to be here. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 119820 TVR Exploring
Chris visits the Silver King and Highlander Mines!
 
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Some more footage of both the Silver King and the Highlander Mine with steep wet sections navigated by a one armed man!
Guanajuato Silver Mines
 
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Guanajuato was founded in 1559 due to the region's rich silver and gold deposits, finds the history behind the mines that triggered one of the most colorful and beautiful cities of Mexico. Hostal Casa de Dante Callejón de Zaragoza 25 +52(473)7310909 #Guanajuato, #México
Taxco, Mexico
 
02:14
From the http://www.VideoSource.com Global Village Travel Guide DVD's http://www.LivingLandscapesHD.com (limited quantities) Mexico stock footage: http://www.videosource.com Transcript: There are riches of another kind in Taxco a silver mining city in the hills of the state of Guerrero and a reborn center for silver craftsmanship. In 1932 an American named William Spratling revived interest in the old city's silversmith trade and today Taxco's silver and copper products can be found all over Mexico. The handwork from Taxco deserves its reputation for being consistently first rate. This silver mine is the most modern mine in Taxco and still produces high quality ore . Taxco's most precious jewel is undoubtedly the beautiful Santa Prisca church considered a baroque classic. The gigantic main altar soars towards the heavens. Financed by the silver mining riches of Jose de la Borda the inscription over his porch once read God gives to Borda and Borda gives to God. Taxco is one of Mexico's best-preserved colonial towns and seems to exemplify charm as its gateways and balconies spill over with flowers of every kind. The 20th century has had little effect on Taxco probably because it was literally cut off from the world until the first paved road reached it in 1930.
Views: 16304 TravelVideoSource
Pozos Mexico - Ghost Town or Not?
 
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Pozos Mexico, a former site of silver and gold mines is now reputed to be a ghost town but one with loads of life. It is replete with art and artisan galleries and has a thriving but small population.
Views: 363 sabgilmar
Long Abandonded "Old Town" in Negaunee, Michigan at the Jackson Mine | Jason Asselin
 
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VISIT MY ETSY STORE, SEE WHAT I HAVE FOR SALE: https://www.etsy.com/shop/LakeShoreEmberlites Near the downtown area of Negaunee, Michigan sits an area known as "old town" where streets have no houses and pavement still exists. Many years back this entire neighborhood began falling into the ground, a result of the Jackson Mine which I visited.. Come see this historic place in Michigan's upper peninsula! IF YOU LIKE MY CONTENT AND WANT TO DONATE, PLEASE CLICK HERE: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=UCXSS5SHLWDYS SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL FOR MORE!! *Follow Me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Jason-Asselins-Adventures-323396484979746 *Follow Me on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/DaRogueReporter *Follow Me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jason_asselin/ @All rights reserved.
Views: 3532 Jason Asselin
World's Amazing Cities Guanajuato, Mexico | Tour with Sharpens Best
 
01:09:25
The most beautiful city in Mexico! Brad Buckner (www.SharpensBest.com) takes us on an exquisite journey through one of the World's Most Unique Places - Guanajuato, Mexico. Through the alley's tunnels, and treasures of this tranquil city. Life bustles with celebration and enjoyment. Guanajuato is a city in central Mexico. It's known for its silver mining history and colonial architecture. Its network of narrow streets, alleyways and tunnels is typified by the Callejón del Beso (Alley of the Kiss), so named because the balconies are close enough for a couple to reach across and kiss. In a former granary, the Alhóndiga de Granaditas is an art and local history museum with pre-Columbian exhibits. Elevation: 6,600′ Weather: 61°F (16°C), Wind NE at 8 mph (13 km/h), 38% Humidity Local time: Sunday 12:50 PM Founded: 1548 Visit Us: www.YouTube.com/SharpensBest www.Facebook.com/SharpensBest www.Twitter.com/SharpensBest
Views: 1151 Sharpens Best
Exploring The Abandoned Crystal Palace Mine
 
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As I was struggling to explain in the video during my graceful, acrobatic leap off of the quartz ledge, a local historian advised us that during World War II, this abandoned mine was worked not for gold (which is what was originally mined here), but for its crystals that were used in radios. Google “crystal oscillator" if you’re curious how that works… During World War II, many American mines that extracted minerals such as gold and silver that were not considered essential to the war effort were ordered closed by the U.S. government. By contrast, mines that pursued tungsten or other such minerals (or crystals) were aggressively supported. Going farther back, there is a story the old-timers told in the past (unfortunately, these old hands are no longer with us) about a large group of Mexican miners that used to work an unknown section of the canyon where this mine is located. The story from the old-timers is that when the Mexican Revolution (which started in 1910) really started getting serious, that the Mexicans were compelled to return home. So, one day, an incredibly long mule train, loaded down with ore and equipment wound its way up and out of the canyon on the long trail back to Mexico. These Mexican miners never returned. I don’t know if that story is true (but it came from reliable sources) and I don’t know if the Mexican miners were working the quartz veins shown in this video. However, there are only four mines in this canyon and I KNOW it wasn’t two of those four. Therefore, it is a distinct possibility and it is worth mentioning, I believe. We were quite impressed by how extensively this quartz zone had been worked on both the surface and underground. Whether it was Mexican miners or someone else, they really worked this canyon thoroughly! I would love to see pictures of how it looked then. Early written descriptions of this mine indicate that a simple stamp mill was sufficient for milling the ore since the quartz veins harbor almost no sulfide. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 22785 TVR Exploring
1950s U.S. Land Blasting and Mining in Mexico
 
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Reel #: 9094 TC In: 000125 TC Out: 000214 Land blasting and mining in Mexico, by a U.S. company, with local Mexican man staging protest and holding up a Stop Blasting sign. This clip is available for licensing without time code and logo - To inquire about licensing email us at [email protected] or call us at (212) 620-3955 - Please Subscribe to our channel, as we are constantly adding new clips. Thanks!
Views: 164 MyFootage.com
Beautiful town of Guanajuato and it's History
 
04:16
The beautiful and colorful town/city of Guanajuato, located in the state with a similar name, situated in northern-central part of Mexico.This colonial town first saw Spaniards in the region in 1522, led by Crystobal Oild, who was under orders of Hernan Cortes, was sent to explore northwestern territories. To this date, state's economy has benefited from its silver mines, which are among the richest in the world. Other mineral harvested from Guanajuato's mountains are tin, gold, copper, led, mercury and opal. Among the state's exports are motor vehicles and auto parts, leather goods and electrical machinery. In 2013, Robert Rodriguez filmed portions of "Once Upon a Time in Mexico" which started famous actor Antonio Banderas and well known Mexican actress Salma Hayek, in locations throughout the city. Guanajuato is also the birth place of a artist, one being internationally know artist "Diego Rivera" Music by Bensound http://www.bensound.com Find me on Instagram at https://instagram.com/raw__talent_/
Views: 1059 RawTalentAbroad
Visiting Taxco Turismo Sustentable 1
 
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TAXCO The small town of Taxco, is located in the northern state of Guerrero, is one of the main tourist destinations in the state of Guerrero. It is set in a sheltered by hills and mountains area. Thanks to the intensive exploitation of silver deposits, it became one of the most important mining centers of the New Spain. Today, in almost every corner of the village there are shops where you can buy silver jewelry produced in the region. The name of this town derives from the word "Tlachco" which means "place of the ball game" in the Nahuatl language. Over time, Taxco was awarded with the name of Taxco de Alarcón in honor of the famous novohispano playwright Juan Ruiz de Alarcón y Mendoza, who was born in this city in 1581. SANTA PRISCA Thanks to its rapid construction (between 1751 and 1758) the church has a fairly homogeneous style and balance forms, resulting in a great example of Mexican baroque. It is interesting that until 1806 was the tallest building in Mexico. Inside you'll find nine altars covered with gold leaf and the altarpiece is dedicated to the Immaculate Conception. Also worth to admire his choir with its impressive organ. TELEFERICO Taxco cable car is one of the attractions most visited by tourists, you can enjoy the panoramic view of the city during air travel. You'll enjoy one of the most beautiful attractions Taxco offers and also be able to see important sights of this magical town. Enjoy 175 meters high the best scenery in Taxco, Guerrero aboard the cable car gondolas Montetaxco. One of the few cable cars in Mexico. Montetaxco board the cable car will make a great experience through the skies of Taxco de Alarcón. CASA HUMBOLT Located in what is known as the Humboldt House, as this scientist spent the night at her, the museum is a walk through the history of Taxco especially during the eighteenth century, when charged booming mining town and its attractions are constructed: the parish of Santa Prisca and Borda House. Plus you'll find works of sacred art, luxury goods and more of everyday life at the time.
Views: 109 Lian Hernández
The Ramada Mine Exploration and Indulging in Some Target Shooting
 
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On the Fourth of July, I made the two-mile hike up a severely eroded and washed-out mining road in the desert to the abandoned Ramada Mine. Like many abandoned mines, this was a former gold, talc, and soapstone mine. While the underground workings weren't considerable, there were two pieces of historic, Twin Coach mining equipment outside the mine as well as some unusual boulders that seemed to be filled with nothing but pure white quartz crystals. I have never seen boulders like that before! Included at the end of the video is some footage of me target shooting several months ago at a remote site in Nevada using my FNP 9 mm handgun. As you'll see, my aim is bad. I need more practice! #ExploringAbandonedMines #AbandonedMines #MineExploring #UndergroundExploration #FNPHandgun