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La Valenciana Silver Mine in Guanajuato Mexico
 
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For 300 years starting in the 1500s this was the number 5 silver mine in the world!
Views: 2538 TheFamilySideShow
Mexico Mines#4 Busted in a mine
 
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I visit a large active mine in Zacatecas Mexico owned by Capstone a Canadian mining company and get caught in there without permission. I also visit a modern operating mill producing Silver.
We Found An Abandoned Town Hidden in the Arizona Mountains.
 
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This was probably my favorite place to explore ever. Hidden in the Arizona mountains sets Ruby, AZ the most well preserved ghost towns to exist.Also i hate that i must say this however the town was abandoned in the 40's but it was founded over 150 years ago making a 200 + year old town. So before you comment understand that. Subscribe to Tim. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKRhTLMBV6dU74IvbO8SEJw patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4575018 spreadshirt: https://www.spreadshirt.com/user/301932432 Mail: P.O. Box 71031 Knoxville, TN 37938 Professional Inquires: [email protected] instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Exploration__Unknown/ twitter: https://twitter.com/explor8tion1 facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/134993677132723
Views: 1569362 Exploration Unknown
New Mexico's Turquoise Trail
 
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Explore three significant and historical town on the Turquoise Trail of New Mexico - Cerrillos, Madrid and Golden. Each offers a glimpse into the heady days when mining for gold, silver and other precious metals, as well as hard and soft coal, made this region wealthy. Today, each is virtually forgotten, although not officially ghost towns. Madrid is being resurrected as an artists' colony; Cerrillos is still a little sleepy village;; Golden, with only 10 families, is but a blip on the map.
Views: 67888 Edward Rozylowicz
Travel Guide New Mexico tm Ghost Towns New Mexico
 
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The Land of Enchantment still echos with voices from its colorful past. These voices speak especially clearly from the ghost towns, mining camps, and little-known places that populate New Mexico's landscape. New Mexico's story is rich with history, from the Ancient Puebloan Indians, to Spanish explorers, pioneers traveling along the Santa Fe Trail, and prospectors in the 19th century. These many folks left their "footprints," not only along the many old trails in the "Land of Enchantment," but also on the many ruins and ghost towns that remain. Cuchillo, established by ranchers and farmers in the 1850s, was named for a nearby creek and a local Apache chief, Cuchillo Negro (Black Knife). Midway between the mines at Chloride and Winston and the railroad at Engle, it flourished as a stage stop and trade center from the 1880s to the 1930s. Charming original buildings still stand, including the Cuchillo Bar and Store, and San Jose Catholic Church, built in 1907 Chloride was founded in 1880. Englishman Harry Pye had discovered silver ore there in the late 1870s, and soon after Pye was killed by Apaches, word of the silver find got out. Despite the threat of Indian attacks Chloride grew to over 3,000 people. In its heyday it had nine saloons, a general store, a dry goods store, a millinery shop, a restaurant, a butcher shop, a candy store, a pharmacy, a Chinese laundry, a photography studio, a school, and two hotels. The Black Range newspaper was printed in Chloride from 1882 to 1896. Of the nearly 500 surveyed mines and prospect holes in the Apache Mining District, a dozen or so made big mines, including the Silver Monument, the U.S. Treasury, and the St. Cloud, which is still in operation, though not mining silver. The demise of Chloride began with the Silver Panic of 1893 and was hastened by the presidential election of 1896, which resulted in a drastic decline in silver prices. Many of Chloride's original structures still stand. The old Pioneer Store is now a museum; next door the former Monte Cristo Saloon and Dance Hall houses a gift shop and gallery featuring work by local artists. Both are open seven days a week from 10am-4pm. Harry Pye's cabin is available as a vacation rental. Other landmarks in this tiny town (population 11) include the 200-year-old Hanging Tree and Doodle Dum, the workshop of longtime resident Cassie Hobbs (19041989). Hillsboro was born in 1877 when gold was found at the nearby Opportunity and Ready Pay mines. Despite fierce Indian attacks, the town grew, becoming the county seat in 1884. Area mines produced more than $6 million in gold and silver, and by 1907 the town had a population of 1,200. Today, this charming, peaceful village of a hundred souls, which boasts flower-filled yards and old cottonwoods lining the main street, offers many enticements, including gift shops; restaurants; artist studios and galleries; the remains of the old county courthouse; the Black Range Museum; Union Church; and Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church. Hillsboros Heritage Day is held annually on the day before Mother's Day. Kingston was founded when a rich lode of silver ore was discovered at the Solitaire in 1882. It grew rapidly and was the largest town in the territory—and one of the wildest in the Wild West. The town soon offered all of the trappings of civilization and culture. Numerous hotels played host to the likes of Mark Twain, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, and Black Jack Ketchum. Stage lines served all major routes, and the town supported twenty-three saloons,some of which advertised fresh oysters 24 hours a day! The town also had 14 grocery and general stores; a brewery; three newspapers; and an Opera House where the Lillian Russell Troupe once performed. Albert Bacon Fall and Ed Doheny of the Teapot Dome Scandal got their start in Kingston. From those glory days, the old Assay Office and the remains of the Victorio Hotel have been renovated as private residences. The Black Range Lodge, a bed and breakfast, offers accommodations in a setting of massive stonewalls and log-beamed ceilings constructed from the ruins of what once was Pretty Sam's Casino. Some Kingston residents offer straw-bale and natural building workshops
Views: 58444 TravelGuideNewMexico
Historic Town of Guanajuato and Adjacent Mines (UNESCO/NHK)
 
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Founded by the Spanish in the early 16th century, Guanajuato became the world's leading silver-extraction centre in the 18th century. This past can be seen in its 'subterranean streets' and the 'Boca del Inferno', a mineshaft that plunges a breathtaking 600 m. The town's fine Baroque and neoclassical buildings, resulting from the prosperity of the mines, have influenced buildings throughout central Mexico. The churches of La ... Source: UNESCO TV / © NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai URL: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/482/
Views: 1927 UNESCO
SILVER WORK OF MEXICO
 
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INDUSTRIAL DOCUMENTARY: On silver industry and jewelry production in Pachuca and Mexico City. Maps trace Mexico City to Pachuca. Statues, pyramid structure, mountains, silver mining plant and surrounding area of Pachuca. Men make silver jewelry in small plant. Jewelry store. Date: ca. 1930 - ca. 1953 Creators: Harmon Foundation (Most Recent) From: Series: Motion Picture Films on Community and Family Life, Education, Religious Beliefs, and the Art and Culture of Minority and Ethnic Groups, ca. 1930 1922 - ca. 1953 1967 Collection H: Harmon Foundation Collection localIdentifier: H-HF-209 naId: 94952 More at http://www.FLYKVNY.com
Silver Mining Town Sold For $1.4 MIllion!
 
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Donate: https://www.paypal.me/SalivateMetal Merchandise:https://teespring.com/stores/salivate-metal Buy Salivate Metal rounds here: http://qualitysilverbullion.com/product-category/salivate-metal/ Bitcoin:14RZD6XGGv4RFMyTTbPndmuYBWTc5w1Sm6 Ethereum:0x98E741Abf6D70ed1e6b3C97203a1B72414F1D6ad Litecoin:LfgL5D7Wvtknagbn2WuCcXasAfquzv2CGB
Views: 916 SalivateMetal
Beautiful Place #223 Ghost Mining Town Mogollon NM Butch Cassidy
 
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This was the highest and most remote location shoot . I literally had to drive up a mountain with no safety rails. The altitude is close to 10,000 ft . The Legendary Butch Cassidy was know to visit this Mining Town . I can not emphasize enough that the road into this old mining town was definitely precarious but I guess I would expect it . Western ghost towns are definitely awesome. The history is amazing please Google and research it , I did but this isn't a history channel so I want you to as well . I will say this , the apache nor the government could tame this frontier town. Absolutely amazing . Enjoy . Follow me as I travel North America in my vintage camper van hunting down beautiful and historic places. Buckle up for the ultimate road trip adventure hosted by yours truly. Like my Facebook page a Life Worth Finding Follow my Tumblr blog a Life Worth Finding Please like share comment and subscribe
Views: 1040 A Life Worth Finding
Ghost Towns and the Ruth-Hope Mine at Sandon
 
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Exploring Abandoned Mines in the famous Valley Of The Ghosts near Sandon and Cody two awesome ghost towns!
MEXICO - REAL DEL MONTE - A BEAUTIFUL SILVER TOWN! LIVING IN MEXICO
 
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Join us and visit Real del Monte, a fairytale silver town, where Don Pedro takes us from the past to the present in his jewelry shop. If you would like to donate, please click on the donations button. Thank you!!! #mexico #hidalgo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Yana-Ferry-378088155977440/ Email: [email protected]
Views: 127 Yana Mexicana
Mexican CACHE in the woods: PART 1 - Silver and GOLD????
 
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First, I apologize about the camera work, the camera was strapped to my chest. Incredible and unbelievable. Literally, just yards away from my tobacco tin silver cache find!! I am NOT a major coin collector so I don't know anything about Mexican coins, these date from 1920's - 1960's, estados unidos mexicanos. This is the HIKE/DIG video..... The REVEAL AND CLEANING is another video yet to be added. Other parts will be labeled in order of upload! Look at my channel for the remaining videos and my previous cache find in this area! NOTE: This is a LONG video that's been cut down. There was parts that I left the camera on just as I walked through the woods scanning, etc. This is an area I am familiar with, but with snakes, hogs, people, guns, etc. in the area I was cautious and didn't stop and start a bunch. Just let it roll. SKIM through it if you have a problem watching the video! .
Views: 53677 outwardjourney
"El Triunfo, old silver mining town" Leggesnbaja09's photos around El Triunfo, Mexico (slideshow)
 
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Preview of Leggesnbaja09's blog at TravelPod. Read the full blog here: http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/leggesnbaja09/1/1239751083/tpod.html This blog preview was made by TravelPod using the TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow creator. Learn more about these videos: http://www.travelpod.com/help/faq#youtube
Views: 344 TripAdvisorTRIPWOWu
🇲🇽REAL DE CATORCE, SAN LUIS POTOSÍ, MEXICO | The SPECTACULAR MEXICAN GHOST TOWN | MEXICO TRAVEL
 
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REAL DE CATORCE, SAN LUIS POTOSI, MEXICO - Hola amigos! We have finally made it to the former silver mining town of Real de Catorce in the state of San Luis Potosi in Mexico! This is a feature length video detailing a location which gives you an authentic feel of the Mexican desert. If you'e planning a Mexico trip or Mexico vacation in 2019, San Luis Potosi and Real de Catorce have to be on your itinerary! Real de Catorce is located approx 2700 metres above sea level north of Matehuala in San Luis Potosi state. It rose to prominence in the late 1700s when silver was discovered, which became the main industry in the area. Once the early 1900s came, the price of silver had plummeted, resulting in the town being largely abandoned. You can visit Real de Catorce on a tour/bus from San Luis Potosi or Matehuala or do it yourself as I did (My Airbnb host in Cedral drove me). There is a bus back at 1540 and at other times throughout the day (you get a small bus through the Ogarrio tunnel then change to a Grupo Senda bus to Matehuala). You can also visit the ghost town higher up by horse, or (As I did), walk! It takes about 1-1.5hrs depending on fitness. WIND - Yes there is wind in the video (I was at 3000 metres), please put the subtitles on if you can't hear. MUSIC - "Distant Echo" - Jakob Ahlbom (Intro and Outro) "Breaking of Dawn 4" - Stefan Mothender (Exploring section) "I Promise You" - Johannes Bornlof (Cemetary and Church scenes) "Cinematic Introductions 4" - Magnus Ringblom (Ghost Town Trek) ALL MUSIC FROM EPIDEMIC SOUND 🔴INFO - PLAYLISTS🔴 🔹Check out my Mexico Playlist including videos from Teotihuacan, Chichen Itza, Isla Holbox and so many areas of Mexico City! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoj_p-4xXUCsAW2ZG5Up3iwdsFzMYYgMi Thanks for Watching! The aim of The Tao of David (formerly First World Traveller) is to provide an honest (sometimes brutally honest) take on the Travel and Digital Nomad world which is often missing from Travel YouTube channels. I provide useful information on Long Term Travel, Solo Travel, Digital Nomad Life, Things to Do, City Basics and finally to be a role model for anyone looking to pursue a similar life, devoid of society's expectations! 🔹Don't forget to like my Instagram at the link below. Check out my Instagram - tao.of.david or https://www.instagram.com/tao.of.david/ 🔹Thankyou to my Patrons Hidhir, Tim, Cynthie, Ian, Laura, Melvin, David, Manuel, George, Shirley, Tracy, Daniel, David, Wendy, Jose, Randall, Momo, Silas & Amarra for supporting me on my journey. 🔹If you would like to become a Patron, check out the link below - https://www.patreon.com/Firstworldtraveller 🔹You can also donate via Paypal - https://paypal.me/pools/campaign/110101740036663020 💲💲SAVE MONEY!💲💲 🔶Get £25GBP off your first stay with Airbnb! - http://www.airbnb.com/c/davido7156 🔶Get £15GBP off your first Booking.com booking - https://booking.com/s/1c182e16 🔶Get 15% off orders at www.travelmotto.com by using discount code TAODAVID15 🔶Get $10USD in Italki Credits by visiting - https://go.italki.com/firstworldtraveller Thanks for Watching! 🔹What do I film with? Samsung J7 Nero DJI Osmo Mobile 1 Stabilizer Wondershare Filmora9 Remember to like, leave a comment, share on your social media and it would be great if you could subscribe! Hit the little bell to get a notification on your phone when I upload a new video! Thankyou! 😎Business e-mail - For Accommodation Reviews, Product Reviews, Sponsored Videos, Tour Company Reviews, Collaborations and more please contact me at [email protected] #realdecatorce #travelmexico #sanluispotosi -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "🇲🇽SAN MIGUEL de ALLENDE | Is This MEXICO'S BIGGEST ANTICLIMAX? | MOVING To MEXICO In 2019?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxUZWpzlcN8 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 7888 Tao of David
Beautiful Place #220 Abandoned Southwest NM Mining Town Paranormal Part 2
 
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This is Part 2 of the amazing old Mining Town I found on my way to Silver City . Look I had a feeling the whole time I was there almost as if someone was watching me . Judge for yourself when I entered the church , the door was open with all the windows closed and then the door clearly closed with me inside . I got chills running up my spine . Follow me as I travel North America in my vintage camper van hunting down beautiful and historic places. Buckle up for the ultimate road trip adventure hosted by yours truly. Like my Facebook page a Life Worth Finding Follow my Tumblr blog a Life Worth Finding Please like share comment and subscribe
mexican silver
 
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The Best Mexican Silver Jewelry from Taxco http://ebaplata.com/mexican-silver-jewelry-taxco.html If you are looking for silver jewelry form Taxco, Mexico you are about to be in for a treat. Best handmade quality, world reknown and special collections such as Frida Khalo Jewelry. Mexican silver jewelry is widely thought to be good quality and extremely fashionable. When thinking about your jewelry options there are many reasons to purchase gold, besides how lovely a few of the designs are. Silver jewelry from Mexico is durable and well-made. Additionally it is the shiniest of all of the gold and silver coins. Many people have chosen silver plate because of their jewelry as a consequence of the amount it reflects the lighting and catches the eye. After a while the need for sterling silver has risen, as has it's popularity. Because of this rise in popularity the amount of producers who assist it has risen also, especially within Mexico. Taxco Mexico Silver Taxco, Guerrero is a popular destination that is famed for the amazing silver plate. This really is partially because of the fact there would be a large mining operation that harvests silver from the earth around the outskirts of the town. Silver Jewelry from Taxco Mexico Mexican Taxco Silver Jewelry, is usually of the most useful and magnificence. Many high-fashion jewelry companies have followed the buzz of developing their goods with gold, a thing that Taxco is doing for several years. Mexican Silver Jewelry Latest Fashions As the every changing fashion world is maintaining growth, people continue buying silver plate not simply because of its great value, however it%u2019s great look. Every one of the new kinds of jewelry obtainable in sterling silver could be traced that because it's affordable both producers and consumers have started voraciously making and acquiring products made out of it. Taxco features a long standing relationship using the sterling silver trade, these types of this, it is one of the absolute the best places to purchase high-end, high-fashion- jewelry in the world.
Views: 74 Liam Hodges
Silver Mining in Bolivia
 
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Explore the famous silver mines of Potosi with Breaking Borders. Historians estimate that nearly 8 million men have died since the 16th century working in the Cerro Rico mines of Potosi. The mines were so important and rich that the Spanish were able to bankroll their empire with the silver found in this exact mine. The silver was then taken by llama train to the Pacific coast, shipped north to Panama City and then across the atlantic to Spain. Music: Animus Vox by The Glitch Mob Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearebreakin... Check out the website: http://www.wearebreakingborders.com Contact via email at: [email protected]
Views: 1819 Breaking Borders
1 Mine in Construction & the Other in Commercial Production - Telson Mining
 
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Telson Mining has one mine in pre-production and under construction and a second in commercial production. Telson Mining Corporation is a Canadian based junior resource mining company with two Mexican gold, silver and base metal mining projects. The Company announced that on May 15, 2018 its Campo Morado mine located in Guerrero, Mexico had begun commercial production a full 3 months ahead of schedule. The goal at Campo Morado is to increase throughput at the mill toward 2,500 tonnes per day during early 2019. Telson's Tahuehueto Project, located in north-western Durango State, Mexico is currently in pre-production at approximately 200 tonnes per day utilizing a toll mill for processing and has entered a construction phase with a timeline to be producing on site in its own mineral processing plant capable of milling at least 1,000 tonnes per day near the end of Q1 2019. To see more videos like this one go to https://www.b-tv.com
Shakespeare Ghost Town | Historic Silver Mining Town | New Mexico | USA | HD
 
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Shakespeare is a ghost town in Hidalgo County, New Mexico, United States. It is currently part of a privately owned ranch, sometimes open to tourists. The entire community was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. Shakespeare | http://www.shakespeareghostown.com/ Shakespeare | New Mexico - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare,_New_Mexico Twitter | https://twitter.com/USAGhostTowns Tumblr | https://ameicanghosttowns.tumblr.com/ About my Channel. Welcome to my channel, the OFFICIAL home of American Ghost Towns, I make video's about Ghost Towns in America and other parts of the world, with the HISTORY and FACTS about these towns. Also video's about Travel and People. Don't Forget to Like, Share and Subscribe Here | https://www.youtube.com/c/AmericanGho... Thanks for visiting. #ShakespeareGhostTown #NewMexico #AmericanGhostTowns #GhostTowns #Abandoned #GhostTown
Views: 4425 American Ghost Towns
Pozos Mexico - Ghost Town or Not?
 
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Pozos Mexico, a former site of silver and gold mines is now reputed to be a ghost town but one with loads of life. It is replete with art and artisan galleries and has a thriving but small population.
Views: 363 sabgilmar
Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico (1 of 2)
 
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The beautiful silver-mining town of Taxco. May 3, 2008.
Views: 88518 Dan Delaney
Visit to a Silver factory in Acapulco
 
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Taxco, Mexico's silver mining town is located a two hours drive from Acapulco October 3rd 2005
Views: 52 Peter Laurence
Big problems in Cartel controled areas while exploring mines in Mexico.
 
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I end up stranded in a cartel controlled region of Mexico in Sinoloa where tourists are not permitted when my vehicle breaks down while looking for abandoned mines.
GUANAJUATO TRAVEL GUIDE - MEXICO'S HIDDEN GEMS 🍦🎇⛪️
 
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Guanajuato is a state in Mexico considered the colonial heartland. It is filled with UNESCO sites, delicious food, and Spanish colonial architecture. Watch as we spend New Years in Guanajuato and sight see across Guanajuato City, San Miguel de Allende, and Dolores Hidalgo! ¡Feliz año nuevo! 0:00 - 2:15 1. San Miguel de Allende This is a city in Guanajuato that is a UNESCO site, home to a thriving expat community and foodie scene. We walk through the cobblestone streets and try some of the delicious food. We also visit Parroquia de San Miguel Arcangel, the iconic Gothic church built to resemble the European churches. It has an ornate steeple and pink stone façade. Next we visit Jacinto 1930, a modern and sophisticated Mexican restaurant. 2:16 - 2:44 2. Guanajuato City We spend new years in Guanajuato City, a neighboring city about an hour and a half from San Miguel de Allende. It was designated a UNESCO site for its silver mines and architecture. It has unique topography, including a valley of colorful buildings, tunnels, and hills that contain silver mines which made the city very rich. 2:45 - 3:40 New Years That night, we visit the zocalo and celebrate New Years Eve festivities with fireworks and twelve grapes for good luck. 3:41 -6:45 Panorama Video of Guanajuato The next day, we visit El Pípila, a mountain top monument with a panoramic view of the city. Then we visit La Valenciana Church (San Cayetano) which is one of the most important churches in town, built in the 18th century at the opening of the La Valenciana silver mine, the largest silver mine in Mexico. 7:00 - 9:44 3. Dolores Hidlago This is an important city for the Mexican War of Independence. It is where the cry for independence "viva Mexico" occurred at the Church of the Grito. It is also where visitors can find some of the most unique ice cream (helados y nieves), including camarones (shrimp), mole, elote (corn), tequila, and tuna (a cactus fruit). Next we visit the UNESCO site Sanctuary of Jesús Nazareno de Atotonilco, which is an 18th century Mexican Baroque church which is famous for its murals. ____________________________________________________ This video was filmed with: ▻Camera - Nikon D7100: http://amzn.to/2eOiu59 ▻Backup Camera - iPhone 6: http://amzn.to/2eWQnOQ ▻SanDisk 16GB Memory Card: http://amzn.to/2jfyXhP ▻Mophie iPhone Battery: http://amzn.to/2jxThfv Travel Favorites: ▻Cross Body Camera "Purse": http://amzn.to/2jShXjJ ▻Travel Ergonomic Head Pillow: http://amzn.to/2jqgF0u ▻Airplane Eye Mask: http://amzn.to/2jS6S1X To read more, visit our blog: ▻http://www.runtheisland.com/blog/ Twitter: ▻https://twitter.com/runtheatlas Instagram: ▻https://www.instagram.com/weruntheatlas Subscribe for more travel photography videos: ▻https://www.youtube.com/user/SquigglesDesigns
Views: 17773 Run The Atlas
Mexico Vlog: Day 4
 
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Day 4 constitutes the exploration of the small cities surrounding Mexico City: Cuernavaca and Taxco.The ancient silver-mining town of Taxco, in particular, was breathtaking. Scattered down a precipitous hillside surrounded by dramatic mountains and cliffs, its perfectly preserved colonial architecture and the twin belfries of its baroque masterpiece, Templo de Santa Prisca, make for one of the most beguiling views anywhere in the central highlands. The video hardly does the town justice. It was a magical experience; I felt like walking straight into a picture book. P.S.: Since it is Holy Week, we were lucky enough to see the Holy Week procession, captured some on video for the curious :)
Views: 534 sonia kurniawan
How cobalt has a small Ontario town dreaming of boom times once again
 
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A small northern Ontario town may soon become extremely important to the increasingly battery-powered world. Abandoned silver mines in Cobalt, Ont., could mean a boom for the once-thriving mining town as battery demand prompts a cobalt rush. Welcome to The National, the flagship nightly newscast of CBC News »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/CBCTheNational?sub_confirmation=1 Voice Your Opinion & Connect With Us Online: The National Updates on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenational The National Updates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» The National is CBC Television's flagship news program. Airing six days a week, the show delivers news, feature documentaries and analysis from some of Canada's leading journalists.
Taxco (Mexican Silver)
 
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Taxco is where the Maestro Mexican Silver Master did some of the best works of art.Tom is coming out with a manual on how to find Maestro Mexican Vintage silver. Go to www.freesilverinfo.com
Views: 133 Tom Gardner
Klondyke Ghost Town | Silver Mining Town | Graham County | Arizona | USA | HD
 
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Klondyke is a populated place in Graham County, Arizona, that was founded around 1900 by some miners who had recently returned from Alaska after participating in the Klondike Gold Rush. The town is located west of Safford in the Aravaipa Valley. The Galiuro Mountains lie to the southeast and the Santa Teresa Mountains to the north. POPULATION 50. Klondyke Website | https://www.visitarizona.com/cities/tucson-and-southern/klondyke/ Klondyke Gold Rush | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klondike_Gold_Rush Klondyke | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klondyke,_Arizona Twitter | https://twitter.com/USAGhostTowns Tumblr | https://ameicanghosttowns.tumblr.com/ About my Channel. Welcome to my channel, the OFFICIAL home of American Ghost Towns, I make video's about Ghost Towns in America and other parts of the world, with the HISTORY and FACTS about these towns. Also video's about Travel and People. Don't Forget to Like, Share and Subscribe Here | https://www.youtube.com/c/AmericanGho... Thanks for visiting. #Klondyke #Arizona #AmericanGhostTowns
Views: 6917 American Ghost Towns
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine - Part 3
 
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Given what a labyrinth this mine is, I thought it would be useful to use that deep winze (or capped shaft) as a point of reference for you. This level is huge! As you can see, it has taken almost two full videos for this level alone. And it still isn’t quite finished yet! However, with the many pockets and twists and turns, it took a while for us to cover everything. Given the size of this level as well as the many ore chutes, it seems a pretty safe bet that a lot of ore was extracted from this section. It also seemed as if there was a lot of mixing of the older and newer workings on this level of the mine. In other words, it seemed as if there were a lot of sections where the miners from the 20th century punched into workings - or overlapped with workings - from the miners in the 1800s. It was somewhat difficult to tell given how many boards had come down, but I believe there is a good chance that we saw examples of square set timbering on two occasions on this level. Square set timbering is the use of what are essentially wooden cubes stacked on top of each other to fill a void or cavity. They can be used to support enormous spaces (which this mine has an abundance of). I pointed out what I thought might have been square set timbering in the video, but didn’t mention how rare it is. To put it in perspective, I’ve explored hundreds of abandoned mines now and that is the first time I have ever seen square set timbering. How about that yellow portable air compressor? At least I think that’s what it was… I love the ingenuity of miners. Every mine we go to that still has some old mining equipment around, will have a good display of unique innovations from the miners – something created on the spot that we haven’t seen anywhere else. If you’ve been enjoying this series so far, you’re going to love the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 19333 TVR Exploring
Real del Monte - Mexicos silver mining town
 
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A day trip around Pachuca the blog entry about my stays abroad: http://divingintotheworld.travellerspoint.com/
Views: 36 chinacetacean
Mineral de Pozos, Guanajuato, Mexico, a recovering ghost town
 
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In this video I take you on a short Vespa trip to Mineral de Pozos, a town rich in history. I give a brief overview of the town and take you to an old mining Hacienda. Facebook: Me: Jose Antonio Cordova Model: Yenisei Gomez Fonseca Photographer: Rene Graziano Fotografia Photographer: Mario Manzo Instagram Me: jose_antonio_cordova Photographer: renegraziano Photographer: mmanzomendoza
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 3
 
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After following the drift we ended the last video with to its surprising conclusion, we started moving back toward the main hub of this enormous abandoned mine. Along the way, we explored many of the side passages and raises that were bypassed on the route in through the main haulage adit located in this part of the mine. Following the very long hike up and out of the mine, we set up our camp for the night (we spent all day underground in this mine) and then headed above the mine to see some of its more interesting features above ground. You’ll see that we explore some of the mine buildings, including one that has an amazing collection inside of it. Although I was curious about what was inside of the modern mine buildings we discovered, I also had a specific destination in mind. One of my exploring buddies – Adit Addicts – had spotted what appeared to be a steam shovel abandoned above the modern mine we explored in this video. I wanted to see this machine to confirm what it was and also to film it if it really did turn out to be a steam shovel. As with the mine itself, it was quite a hike up into the hills above it. Fortunately, I was able to find the machine (although the GPS took me on a terrible route to do so) and it was indeed a steam shovel. Sort of... It was a steam shovel at one time, but had actually been converted over to run on an internal combustion motor. I had never seen anything like that before and it was pretty amazing to see one out in the desert mountains still next to the pile of dirt it had been excavating decades ago. The modern abandoned mine featured in this video is definitely not the first mine in this area and when looking around above the mine, it was fairly common to see old collapsed adits and old surface mining work. Many of these seemed to be more exploratory in nature though. This area has historically been a large producer of ores containing lead, copper and silver and a thriving town was once supported by the mines. However, today, there is almost no trace left of the ghost town or an aerial tramway that also used to be here. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 114332 TVR Exploring
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine - Part 4
 
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Well, here it is… I’ve explored hundreds of abandoned mines now and I’ve seen some amazing things, but nothing has been as awesome for me as stepping into the bottom of that gigantic natural cavern. I will never forget that. I can only imagine what the miners thought when they first punched in to the cave and tried to gain an understanding of how huge it was with only the benefit of candles or carbide lamps. Interestingly, the reports I read on this mine indicated that the floor of this cavern was covered in staggeringly rich oxidized ore. So, the natural processes that formed the cave (presumably water passing through the mountain?) left behind a rich reward for the pioneering miners that discovered the cave. The geological features inside the cavern lead me to believe that there was a fair amount of water that flowed through despite this mine being in the desert. Pretty interesting geology, no? In a way, it is a shame that the miners were not more concerned with aesthetics because it would have been nice to see how massive the cavern was originally. However, sentimentality aside, the miners must have been delighted to fill that cavern up with waste rock rather than having to haul it all of the way outside. Everything that we were climbing around on in there was all waste rock. Does anyone disagree with me or have another idea about that unusual two-toned pile I climbed up? Given how finely ground it was, it sure looked like tailings. The miners dropped tons and tons of waste rock into the huge cavern, why not tailings from the surface as well? Even with the benefit of time, I still don’t have a better idea on that one. It's a good thing that air flowing out reminded us of that last “little” drift we hadn’t explored, wasn’t it? We were packed up and were heading out… Ha, that would have sucked to go all of the way there and to have missed that cavern!! A slight correction – in the video, I mention the collapse that we saw the other side of “in the last video.” It was actually the second video rather than the last video (that was a huge level). We’re not done with this mine yet! The fifth and final video in this series will be posted next Wednesday and there is some great stuff still to be seen. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 71551 TVR Exploring
Interview / Mexican Silver
 
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Smallcap Investor (www.smallcapinvestor.de) presents you an Interview with Mr. Feisal Somji from Mexican Silver Mines, made at the HARD ASSETS CONFERENCE in New York!
Views: 320 IRWORLD99
Zacatecas Mexico  | Silver Mine
 
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We went to Zacatecas in Mexico what a beautiful city ! GFG Tshirts now Available !!!! SQUAD UP! http://tinyurl.com/y938pmem want to support my channel? become a GFG Hero today! https:www.patreon.com/gamersfitnessgroup Focused/Energized - HEADSHOT - http://www.opnutraceuticals.com Want to see what I'm working on Beforehand ? TwitchTv www.twitch.tv/gamersfitnessgroup Twitter @ www.twitter.com/gamersfitness Instagram @ www.instagram.com/Gamersfitnessgroup
Views: 1464 Gamers Fitness Group
Copala, Mexico - San Jose Church HD (2014)
 
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Copala, formerly known as San José de Copala, is a four-century-old silver-mining town in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. The town is in the municipality of Concordia. The area was occupied and ruled by the indigenous peoples until 1564, when Francisco de Ibarra crossed the Sierra Madre Occidental from Durango and conquered the area for Spain. In 1565 prospectors discovered silver veins and the town of Copala was founded to serve the mines. The town was named after a mythical city of gold for which de Ibarra had unsuccessfully searched in northern Mexico. The town of Copala was destroyed in 1616 by an uprising of Tepehuan Indians, but was rebuilt after the rebellion was quelled the following year.
Views: 677 ACG Travel Videos
Exploring Bayhorse mining ghost town
 
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Bayhorse was a town built to support the various mines in the area. Mining began to boom in the late 1870's and Bayhorse used modern technology to increase profitability of ore reduction. Named Bayhorse because a couple prospectors met a gentleman with two bay horses that told them of rich mining prospects here. In the 1890's, silver and lead prices dropped and ultimately closed this operation. The town supported 300-500 people until that time and work in these mines slowed until it closed completely some time in the early 20th century. Nearly 100,000 tons of ore had been removed from the mines here. In 2006, Bayhorse became a unit of the Idaho State Parks dept. They have done a great job of preserving this site. ---------------------------------------------------------------- Check out the Idaho State Parks page on this and other park sites https://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/land-yankee-fork Want to help me continue making these videos? Check out my Patreon page and help me go commercial free (or at least fewer commercials). https://www.patreon.com/detourswithfrank You can also check out my facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/detourswithfrank/ Or my instagram page at https://www.instagram.com/detourswithfrank/
Views: 1184 Detours with Frank
Exploring abandoned silver mine 500'  level
 
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Old abandoned silver mine with lots of equipment Left Behind
Views: 7083 Mine Explorers
Travel Video Discover Talpa Jalisco Mexico by PromovisionPV.com
 
02:14
Travel Video Discover Talpa Mexico by PromovisionPV.com [email protected] Surrounded by pine covered mountains, Talpa de Allende, another silver mining town, founded by the Spanish in 1599, has a population of about 10,500 - including 9 gringos, is an important religious site in Mexico. There are 4 pilgrimages a year to see the Virgin "Rosario of Talpa", a small statue that is said to have healing powers, On these occasions the town's population triples.
Views: 1157 promovision
Chris visits the Silver King and Highlander Mines!
 
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Some more footage of both the Silver King and the Highlander Mine with steep wet sections navigated by a one armed man!
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine  - Part 5
 
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We’re at the end of this series now... If you’ve made it through all five of these videos, I thank you for watching and I’m going to assume that you saw why we enjoyed this abandoned mine so much. With some mines, there is a feeling of relief to get outside again into the open skies and fresh air. However, I actually find myself reluctant to leave mines such as this one or the Buca della Vena Mine in Italy. Sure, we’re usually tired after a day of scrambling through the different levels, but they are really fun to explore and after seeing so many amazing things, one is reluctant to leave the party early. As you probably gathered, this is not the last level in this mine, but this is as far as we could go on this trip. There was no way we could have gotten up those soggy, rotten ladders running up the side of that shaft or winze (I still don’t know if that was a winze or a capped shaft). You saw how many rungs were missing and by the point we arrived, those ladders were essentially mush. Speaking of rotten things… How did you like that false floor hanging out over that huge open space? I thought it was pretty cool to be able to look back on that and to see what the platform looked like underneath. It isn’t often that one is able to get a perspective like that. And I’m glad I didn’t go out on it because that would not have been a pleasant ride! I’m also glad we were able to gain additional views down into the huge cave as well. I don’t know if you noticed or not, but at one of those openings I showed down into the cave, you could see ore cart rail jutting out a little bit into the opening. That was one of the points where the miners were dumping the waste rock into the cave. As great as it was to see more of the enormous cave, I think my favorite thing on this upper level was that sign displaying the “Mine Hoist Signal Code.” It is very rare to find intact signs like that. First of all, not many mines are big enough to even have one in the first place. Secondly, the wet or flooded mines will soon cause a sign like that to rot away to nothing. And, lastly, although they might be preserved in the dry, desert mines, those are some of the first mine relics to disappear into the backpacks of “collectors.” So, it is a treat to see one still in place where it belongs. It took us a full day to explore the section of this mine that you saw in this series of five videos, but that is far from the whole mine. I’ve spoken with an individual that knows this mine very well and has seen far more of it than we have. According to him (which is supported by the maps I have seen), we saw only approximately 20% of this abandoned mine in this series. Imagine a series of 25-30 videos that it would have taken to cover this one mine! We haven’t been in many mines that are that big… Really, there aren’t many mines that ARE that big. I haven’t posted them yet, but I actually still have two mine series to publish that are also of enormous mines like this. I think you’ll like those... ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 29359 TVR Exploring
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine  - Part 2
 
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And now we start working through exploring the upper levels of this awesome abandoned mine... I mentioned in the first video that this mountain was Swiss-cheesed with natural caverns and you’ll see more and more for the geology fans and the rock heads as we continue to make our way up through the levels. Given the absence of daylight above, we don’t know if that was a winze or a capped shaft toward the end of this video, but those flooded levels show you why we are heading up rather than down. Given how far we moved up into the heart of the mountain from the level where we started in the first video, one would think the water table couldn’t be too far below that first level. However, when we dropped that rock down the winze with the elevator and hoist, it fell for a very long way before impacting something. So, maybe that section isn’t flooded? My knowledge of hydrology is too limited to understand underground rivers and that sort of thing. Also, I don’t know about you, but I love having the miner’s graffiti in the mines. Sometimes it is useful for providing dates, but when you can see the personalities of the miners carried through time on the ribs (sides) of an adit, I find that to be magical. The moment is long past and the miners may all be gone now, but it isn’t a stretch to imagine being there with the miners joking around with each other and giving each other a hard time. That caved section we talked about toward the end of the video that blocked our progress will become quite relevant again later. Don’t worry, you will see the other side of it. And in a very dramatic setting too! My apologies for the mild annoyance presented by the flickering effect in some scenes. This is produced by pulse width modulation from my headlamp. Although not ideal, it hopefully does not take away from the content of the video and the issue has been corrected for future videos. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 22681 TVR Exploring
Contiki Mexican Fiesta: Acapulco to Taxco
 
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Contiki Mexican Fiesta Day 6: Traveling from Acapulco to Taxco, Mexico, an adorably small town of 50,000 person on a mountain top. This town is best known for it's silver and mining industry. It was a fairly long travel day in the bus with no stops, so after our walking tour we spent the day lounging by the pool! Hope you enjoy this little learning video! Plus I loved staying at a haunted mission hotel! Once in a lifetime!!!!
Views: 142 Mapless Adventures
Excellon Resources has unique production in Mexico with significant exploration potential
 
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Excellon Resources (CVE:EXN-OTC:EXLLF) President and CEO Brendan Cahill sat down with Proactive Investors at PDAC Toronto 2019. Excellon is a silver and base metals producer headquartered in Toronto. They produce from their Platosa underground mine located near the town of Bermejillo in Durango, Mexico.
Visit of the silver mine of Potosi
 
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Visite de Potosi (Bolivie) et de sa mine d'argent, In der Silberminen von Potosi (Bolivia) , Potosi (Bolivia), las minas de plata Potosí is a city, the capital of the department of Potosí in Bolivia. It is at an altitude of 3967 meters and has about 115,000 inhabitants. It is claimed to be the highest city in the world. It lies beneath the Cerro Rico ("Rich mountain"), a mountain of silver ore, which has always dominated the city. Founded 1546 as a mining town, it soon produced fabulous wealth, becoming the largest city in the Americas (except for Mexico City) with a population exceeding 200,000 people. In Spanish there is still a saying "vale un Potosí" meaning "worth a fortune" and, for Europeans, "Perú"—Bolivia was part of the Viceroyalty of Perú and was known as Alto Perú before becoming independent— was a mythical land of riches. Potosí is the only American city mentioned in Miguel de Cervantes's famous novel satirizing chivalry, Don Quixote, with clear reference to its riches. It is from Potosí that most of the Spanish silver came. Indian labour, forced by Francisco de Toledo, Count of Oropesa through the traditional Incan mita institution of contributed labor, came to die by the thousands, not simply from exposure and brutal labor, but by mercury poisoning: in the paved patio the silver-ore, having been crushed to powder by hydraulic machinery, was cold-mixed with mercury and trodden to an amalgam by the native workers with their bare feet. [1] The mercury was then driven off by heating, producing deadly vapors. After 1800 the silver mines became depleted, making tin the main product. This eventually led to a slow economic decline. Still, the mountain continues to be mined for silver to this day. Due to poor worker conditions (lack of protective equipment from the constant inhalation of dust), the miners still have a short life expectancy with most of them contracting silicosis and dying around 40 years of age. It is estimated that, in the past years of Incan labour, roughly 8 million indians died "eaten" by the Rich Hill. During the War of Independence (1809--1825, see History of Bolivia) Potosi frequently passed between the control of Royalist and Patriot forces. Major blunders by the First Argentine Auxiliary Army (under the command of Juan José Castelli) led to an increased sense that independence was needed and fostered resentment towards Argentina. During that occupation there was anarchy and martial excess, and Potosi became unfriendly to the point where it could not be defended. When the second auxiliary army arrived it was received well, and the commander, Manuel Belgrano did much to heal the past wounds inflicted by the tyrannical minded Castelli. When that army was forced to retreat, Belgrano took the calculated decision to blow up the Casa de Moneda. Since the locals refused to evacuate this explosion would have resulted in many casualties, but by then the fuse was already lit. Disaster was averted not by the Argentinians who at that time were fleeing, but by locals who put the fuse out. In one stroke the good feelings Belgrano delicately built were destroyed. Two more expeditions from Argentina would seize Potosi. (wikipedia) 08.1999 VALPARD FILMS http://valpardfilms.free.f
Views: 14316 valpard
Great Finds At A Gold Mine In The Sierras - Part 2
 
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Coincidentally, the adits we discovered during this full day of exploring were progressively older. So, they make for an interesting walk back in time that happens to be in chronological order. The adit we explored in the first video was last worked in the 1960s or 1970s, while the adit seen in this video was likely last worked around the 1930s. I say “likely” because with many of these older mines, it is difficult – and often impossible – to find detailed records. Often, there are no records at all to be found in the public domain. As you undoubtedly observed, the adit I explored in this video was not the most pleasant one and, as such, I imagine you will not be shocked to learn that it did not make it onto my “Favorite Abandoned Mines” list. This one really ticked a lot of the “unpleasant” boxes. Bad air? Check. Deep, sucking mud? Check. Unstable rock overhead? Check. Difficult to access? Check. That orange, sucking mud is something that I associate with underground placer mines as that is the only place I have seen it. Many viewers have compared it to orange mud that B.C. Frank encountered in Anyox. However, there are some significant differences. Perhaps the most significant is that this “mine mud” is very dense. It will not wash away unless it is subjected to intense pressure. Furthermore, it develops a hard crust on the surface – almost like a rust. One can almost, but not quite, walk on this crust. Instead, one has to push through it like an icebreaker, which is quite a lot of work when one is also fighting through the sucking mud underneath. Some underground placer mines are so choked with this mud that it is not possible to proceed beyond a wall of mud that has formed. To confuse matters more, however, some underground placer mines don’t have this mud at all. This “mine mud” flows down from the underground placer deposits (ancient river channels), but it is not clear to me why some sections of the ancient river channels produce this awful mud in mines and other sections do not produce it at all. I am talking about mines that are very close to each other too, not in different mining districts. Contrary to how it might look in the video, I was not using a candle to illuminate the haulage adit. Instead, I was using two bright (1000+ lumens each) lights with fresh batteries. That dark rock just swallows up the light to an incredible degree. Fortunately, the adits that Mr. McBride located across the creek while I was slopping around in the mud with this adit – which will be seen in the third (and final) video in this series - more than make up for the setbacks at these first two adits. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 13956 TVR Exploring
U.S.Land blasting and Mining in Mexico Stock Footage in HD
 
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Land blasting and mining in Mexico, by a U.S. company, with local Mexican man staging protest and holding up a Stop Blasting sign. , http://www.myfootage.com/details.php?gid=58&sgid=&pid=18111 This clip is available for licensing from MyFootage.com - Call us at (212) 620-3955 - Please Subscribe to our channel, as we are constantly adding new clips. Thanks!
Views: 163 MyFootage.com
San Sebastian, Mexico.
 
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Produced By Black Dahlia Films. Shot 2/6/18 San Sebastián was founded as a mining town in 1605. Gold, silver and lead were mined in the area. More than 25 mines and a number of foundries were established by 1785. The town was formally established as a city in 1812 and is a designated "Pueblos Magicos"... a town maintaining it's historical character and promoted by the federal government as a tourist destination.
Views: 146 BLACK DAHLIA FILMS
Father and son explore the Highlander Mine and Mill, a rare intact historic find!
 
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The last part of an exciting quest to travel through a massive mine and explore a mill that is still intact after being closed over 50 years ago.