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Song for Rosemont
 
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Please sign petition: https://www.change.org/petitions/the-white-house-and-the-u-s-army-corps-of-engineers-protect-the-santa-rita-mountains-in-az-from-the-proposed-rosemont-mine Original song and video in an effort to bring awareness of the beauty that is at risk with allowing an open pit mine to devastate the entire Rosemont region. Composed and performed by James Glinski with collaboration by Guy Gabriel on lead vocals Ruben Ruiz on lead guitar and commentary by Keith Willmarth: An Antiquated Law that Needs Revision A cloak of futility hangs over efforts to draw attention to the many undeniable adverse impacts of the proposed Rosemont Mine. - despite an undeniably strong public sentiment in opposition to the mine. A cloak which makes reason itself seem irrelevant. This cloak is the Mining Act of 1872, which grants an absolute right to mine on public lands. Although the mine would be on public land, there is no requirement to weigh net impacts to the public versus the benefit to a single company. All the public comments on the Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed mine apply not to the merits of the project itself, but to the adequacy of the EIS. Yet a ray of hope shines, that Rosemont Camp will remain the idyllic place that it is, for a reason beyond the pale of the mining law. Fortunately, the law does not allow mine developers to desecrate adjacent lands. For right across the road from the proposed mine lies Cienega Creek, one of the last relatively intact perennial streams in the Sonoran Desert. Parts of it have been designated National and Pima County preserve areas. The EPA has exercised its power to prevent issuance of a Clean Water Permit from the Army Corps of Engineers, on the grounds that the mine pit would draw water away from Cienega Creek. This points up the absurdity of the Mining Act of 1872. Despite the many devastating impacts that the mine would indisputably have at the mine site, it's only because of an impact beyond the mine site that the mine is likely to be denied permission to exist. Yet let us not assume that there will be no Rosemont Mine. If Rosemont should somehow negotiate their way to the Clean Water Permit, the only thing still able to prevent the start of mining operations might be a general public outcry. We still have until Valentines Day to submit objections to the mine. Let's work with all our heart to save this natural gem, so that we can celebrate the triumph of heart over dollars, come Valentine's day. Those who have previously entered comments into the record regarding the Rosemont mine proposal are entitled to file objections based on their original comments. For detailed instructions, see: http://www.rosemonteis.us/ . Those not eligible to comment can still join us in the effort to protect the lands that would be degraded by the mine. Please go to: http://www.scenicsantaritas.org/20140130_SSSR%20Letter-writing%20handout.pdf
Views: 887 JTG Videos
The Real Doc Holliday
 
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Check out Picture the Recipe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEBtDzuikFw24LPsgGyW1AQ If you happen to like our videos and have a few bucks to spare to support our efforts, check out our Patreon page where we've got a variety of perks for our Patrons, including Simon's voice on your GPS and the ever requested Simon Whistler whistling package: https://www.patreon.com/TodayIFoundOut →Some of our favorites: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLR0XuDegDqP10d4vrztQ0fVzNnTiQBEAA →Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut The Truth About the Bermuda Triangle https://youtu.be/R-KBDzDkjQc?list=PLR0XuDegDqP2R3jSa-iTHRruVczfaZ234 Miss Unsinkable https://youtu.be/8-798XH2RPE?list=PLR0XuDegDqP33-NUx7wuKb-3PDj-gRKgR In this video: In the 1993 movie Tombstone, Doc Holliday (portrayed by actor Val Kilmer) is depicted as a good guy at heart, helping Wyatt Earp to keep order and law in the dangerous old west town of Tombstone, Arizona. As is the case with Earp, there is a mound of evidence that the real Doc Holliday wasn’t nearly so squeaky clean. Here is the truth behind the legend of the “slickest gunslinger in the west,” Doc Holliday. Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2014/12/real-doc-holliday/ Sources: http://news.discovery.com/human/what-happened-at-the-ok-corral-121026.htm http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2014/12/wyatt-earp-great-american-villain/ http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/earp/spicerdecision.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Holliday http://www.crimelibrary.com/gangsters_outlaws/outlaws/earp/8.html http://www.truewestmagazine.com/jcontent/history/history/history-features/7031-looking-for-doc-in-dallas http://www.legendsofamerica.com/we-docholliday.html http://www.truewestmagazine.com/jcontent/history/history/history-features/5514-doc-hollidays-racist-killing https://books.google.com/books?id=vFFop5Ug_zIC&pg=PR4&dq=Karen+Holliday+Tanner+doc+holliday&hl=en&sa=X&ei=OAqOVOP_CKv7sASSiYGoCw&ved=0CBsQ6AEwAA#v=snippet&q=249&f=false http://victoriawilcoxbooks.com/docs-story/ http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/doc-holliday-kills-for-the-first-time http://web.archive.org/web/20090428084917/http://www.angelfire.com/co4/earpgang/interviewone.html https://books.google.com/books?id=qn9hKZjISPgC&pg=PA498&dq=The+Illustrated+Life+and+Times+of+Doc+Holliday,+Bob+Boze+Bell&hl=en&sa=X&ei=5t6NVPrmCI-YyQTSs4KgDg&ved=0CB4Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=The%20Illustrated%20Life%20and%20Times%20of%20Doc%20Holliday%2C%20Bob%20Boze%20Bell&f=false Image Credit: https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-195449314/stock-photo-pulmonary-tuberculosis-film-chest-x-ray-show-fibrosis-interstitial-infiltration-both-lung-due-to-mycobacterium-tuberculosis-infection https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-212129269/stock-vector-bang-sound-of-a-shot-revolver-in-hand-pop-art-retro-vector-illustration https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-182655004/stock-photo-pulmonary-tuberculosis-%28-tb-%29-%3A-chest-x-ray-show-alveolar-infiltration-at-both-lung-due-to-mycobacterium-tuberculosis-infection https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-126577259/stock-photo-tuberculosis-diagnosis%2C-medical-concept-composition-of-medicaments-tuberculosis-printed-diagnosis-with-blurred-text-3d https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Val_Kilmer_Cannes.jpg https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonasb/3090262622 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Griffin_Georgia_Welcome_Sign.JPG https://pixabay.com/ru/%D0%B3%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B6%D0%B4%D0%B0%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B0%D1%8F-%D0%B2%D0%BE%D0%B9%D0%BD%D0%B0-%D0%B1%D0%B8%D1%82%D0%B2%D0%B0-%D0%B0%D0%BC%D0%B5%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%B0-74010/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/locosteve/4902609621/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/locosteve/4259167181 https://www.flickr.com/photos/locosteve/8253114206 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tucson-Amtrak_Station-1907-1922-2.JPG https://www.flickr.com/photos/locosteve/4259769342 Music from Jukedeck - create your own at http://jukedeck.com.
Views: 454297 Today I Found Out
Dying declaration Meaning
 
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Video shows what dying declaration means. A statement that would normally be deemed inadmissible as evidence in a court of law as hearsay, but is deemed admissible because it was made by a person who believed himself to be dying, is about the circumstances of that person's death, and was followed by that person's actual death.. Dying declaration Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say dying declaration. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 1588 ADictionary
1. Introduction, Course Overview, What is Technology?
 
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MIT STS.050 The History of MIT, Spring 2011 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/STS-050S11 Instructor: David Mindell, Merritt Roe Smith, Karen Aernson License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 12898 MIT OpenCourseWare
Neither Slave nor Citizen: State Control of Brazilian Free Blacks in the 19th Century
 
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The study of Brazilian race and slavery in the nineteenth century is too often framed by the structure of abolitionist legislation; first that applied to the cessation of the Atlantic slave trade leading up to 1850, and then to the abolition of slavery itself before the passage of the Golden Law in 1888. Traditional and contemporary scholarship points to a lack of segregationist law as central to understanding Brazil’s post abolition racial hierarchy. Given the comparatively large size of Brazil’s free black population in the first decade of the nineteenth century (free Afro-Brazilians represented a plurality, a larger population than whites or enslaved Africans) my current research examines how state supported institutions such as orphanages, the police, and the military, alongside regional and national legislation, targeted and controlled the lives of free Afro-Brazilians before and after final abolition. Talk by Zachary Morgan. Co-sponsored by Africana Studies and the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice
Gold Coast (British colony) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Gold Coast (British colony) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Gold Coast was a British colony on the Gulf of Guinea in west Africa from 1867 to its independence as the nation of Ghana in 1957. The first Europeans to arrive at the coast were the Portuguese in 1471. They encountered a variety of African kingdoms, some of which controlled substantial deposits of gold in the soil. The kingdoms had a tradition of enslaving captives taken in warfare. Some were sold to Arab traders from North Africa and transported to Islamic Mediterranean civilizations. In 1482, the Portuguese came to the continent for increased trade. They built the Castle of Elmina, the first European settlement on the Gold Coast. From here they acquired slaves and gold in trade for European goods, such as metal knives, beads, mirrors, rum, and guns. News of the successful trading spread quickly, and British, Dutch, Danish, Prussian and Swedish traders arrived as well. The European traders built several forts along the coastline. The Gold Coast had long been a name for the region used by Europeans because of the large gold resources found in the area. The slave trade was the principal exchange and major part of the economy for many years. In this period, European nations began to explore and colonize the Americas. Soon the Portuguese and Spanish began to export African slaves to the Caribbean, and North and South America. The Dutch and British also entered the slave trade, at first supplying markets in the Caribbean and on the Caribbean coast of South America. The Royal Trading Company was established by the Crown in 1752 to lead its trading in Africa. It was replaced by the African Company of Merchants, which led the British trading efforts into the early 19th century. In 1821 the British government withdrew their charter and seized privately held lands along the coast. In 1867 the government formed the British Gold Coast colony, after having taken over the remaining interests of other European countries. They purchased and incorporated the Danish Gold Coast in 1850 and the Dutch Gold Coast, including Fort Elmina, in 1872. Britain steadily expanded its colony through the invasion and subjection of local kingdoms as well, particularly the Ashanti and Fante confederacies. The Ashanti people had controlled much of the territory of Ghana before the Europeans arrived and were often in conflict with them. In the 21st century they continue to constitute the largest ethnic community in Ghana. Four wars, the Anglo-Ashanti Wars, were fought between the Ashanti (Asante) and the British, who were sometimes allied with the Fante. During the First Anglo-Ashanti War (1822–24), the two groups fought because of a disagreement over an Ashanti chief and slavery. The British had abolished the Atlantic slave trade but kept the institution in its colonies until 1834. Tensions increased in 1874 during the Second Ashanti War (1873–74) when the British sacked the Ashanti capital of Kumasi. The Third Ashanti War (1893–94) occurred because the new Ashanti ruler Asantehene wanted to exercise his new title. From 1895–96 the British and Ashanti fought in the Fourth and final Ashanti War, where the Ashanti fought for and lost their independence. In 1900 the Ashanti Uprising took place. The British suppressed the violence and captured of the city of Kumasi. At the end of this last Ashanti War, the territory of the Ashanti people became a British protectorate on 1 January 1902. By 1901, British had established a colony incorporating all of the Gold Coast, with its kingdoms and tribes considered a single unit. The British exploited and exported a variety of natural resources such as gold, metal ores, diamonds, ivory, pepper, timber, grain and cocoa. The British colonists built railways and a complex transport infrastructure to support the shipment of such commodity goods. This has formed the basis for the transport infrastructure in modern-day Ghana. They also built Weste ...
Views: 112 wikipedia tts
ch 11) Robber Barons And Rebels
 
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chapter 11: A People's History (Of The United States) Howard Zinn. ~ Chapter 11, "Robber Barons and Rebels" covers the rise of industrial corporations such as the railroads and banks and their transformation into the nation's dominant institutions, with corruption resulting in both industry and government. Also covered are the popular movements and individuals that opposed corruption, such as the Knights of Labor, Edward Bellamy, the Socialist Labor Party, the Haymarket martyrs, the Homestead strikers, Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman, Eugene V. Debs, the American Railway Union, the Farmers' Alliance, and the Populist Party.
Views: 17956 andi burridge
Mining industry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:48 1 History 00:01:57 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:13 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:23 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:00 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:01 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:12 1.6 The Americas 00:16:14 1.7 Modern period 00:17:49 2 Mine development and lifecycle 00:20:32 3 Mining techniques 00:22:00 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:03 3.2 Underground mining 00:24:32 3.3 Highwall mining 00:26:16 4 Machines 00:27:38 5 Processing 00:30:22 6 Environmental effects 00:34:25 6.1 Waste 00:36:53 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:37:36 7 Mining industry 00:41:45 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:42:33 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:46:31 7.3 World Bank 00:48:38 8 Safety 00:52:16 9 Records 00:54:44 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.998962699879125 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 51 wikipedia tts
Improve Vocabulary ★ Sleep Learning ★ Listen To Spoken English Conversation, Binaural Beats Part 25✔
 
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Improve Vocabulary ★ Sleep Learning ★ Listen To Spoken English Conversation, Binaural Beats Part 25✔ English tivi is a free Channel for English learners. You will find free learn english through story. Thousands of English Videos are waiting for you. They will help you learn English. ☞ Thanks for watching! ☞ Please subcribe, like and share if you enjoyed the video :) thanks so much ♥ https://goo.gl/b9XRzY Google+ : https://goo.gl/291RaJ Website: https://englishtivi.blogspot.com/ Fanfage: https://www.facebook.com/Englishtivi Thank you for watching, English tivi wish you finish Don't Forget LIKE, Share VIDEO & Subscribe My Channel
Views: 2505 English tivi
Improve Vocabulary ★ Sleep Learning ★ Listen To Spoken English Conversation, Binaural Beats Part 24✔
 
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Improve Vocabulary ★ Sleep Learning ★ Listen To Spoken English Conversation, Binaural Beats Part 24✔ English tivi is a free Channel for English learners. You will find free learn english through story. Thousands of English Videos are waiting for you. They will help you learn English. ☞ Thanks for watching! ☞ Please subcribe, like and share if you enjoyed the video :) thanks so much ♥ https://goo.gl/b9XRzY Google+ : https://goo.gl/291RaJ Website: https://englishtivi.blogspot.com/ Fanfage: https://www.facebook.com/Englishtivi Thank you for watching, English tivi wish you finish Don't Forget LIKE, Share VIDEO & Subscribe My Channel
Views: 2925 English tivi
The Assyrian Legacy in the Cradle of Civilization
 
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Amir Harrak from the University of Toronto presented "The Neo-Assyrian Winged Bulls and their Origins." Christopher Woods from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago discussed Mesopotamian literature in general and the preservation of the Gilgamesh Epic. Simo Parpola from the University of Helsinki discussed Assyria after the collapse of the Empire and the impact of Assyrian statecraft, religion and visual arts on the ancient and modern world. First of three sessions in a daylong symposium. Speaker Biography: Amir Harrak is an associate professor in the University of Toronto's department of Near and Middle Eastern civilizations. Speaker Biography: Christopher Woods is an associate professor of Sumerian at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. Speaker Biography: Simo Parpol is a professor emeritus of Assyriology at the University of Helsinki. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7670
Views: 1119 LibraryOfCongress
Cambridge Talks IX Keynote by Reinhold Martin, "Infrastructure, Media, and Power-Knowledge...
 
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Reinhold Martin, author of The Organizational Complex (MIT Press, 2003), will present the keynote lecture for "Cambridge Talks IX: Inscriptions of Power; Spaces, Institutions, and Crisis." Beginning but not ending with Michel Foucault’s elusive, omnipresent “power-knowledge” couplet, this talk will examine the aesthetic and technical properties of certain infrastructures through which this couplet is manifest. These infrastructures, which could be called architectural, will mainly be found in research universities in the United States during the late nineteenth century, with genealogical ties to the business corporation. I will try, however, also to show the limits of transferring the Foucauldian analytic directly onto architecture as commonly construed. Likewise for the “new materialism” that has more recently shed significant light on the multifarious life of “things.” Instead, a “gay science” of corporate power, centered on the university, can only arise during those brief intervals when architecture appears, repeatedly, as one among many media.
Views: 1372 Harvard GSD
12/7/18 Census Scientific Advisory Committee (CSAC) Meeting (Day 2)
 
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12/7/18 Census Scientific Advisory Committee (CSAC) Meeting (Day 2) 8:30AM - 2PM
Views: 162 uscensusbureau
UC Berkeley Winter Commencement Ceremony and Investiture of Chancellor Christ
 
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UC Berkeley Winter 2017 Commencement Ceremony Investiture of Carol T. Christ as the University’s 11th chancellor by UC President Janet Napolitano Sunday, December 17th, 2017 Haas Pavilion 10:30 a.m.
Views: 1016 UC Berkeley Events
Core i9 review, new Sound Blaster X, Xbox One X PC build, and more | The Full Nerd Ep 25
 
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Gordon, Brad, and Adam are joined once again by special guest Alaina Yee to go over some of the hottest news stories of the week. Including Gordon's Skylake X review, a brand new 32 bit Sound Blaster, and Alaina's Xbox One X PC build. Ask all the questions you want and subscribe to the audio feed on the iTunes Store and Google Play!
Views: 9554 PCWorld
Maria Gunnoe, 2012 Wallenberg Lecture
 
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Maria Gunnoe is a fearless advocate for environmental and social justice. Despite threats and intimidation Ms. Gunnoe works to educate and build citizen advocacy, and to rally communities that face the destruction of their natural environment in her home of Boone County, West Virginia. About the Wallenberg Medal and Lecture Each year the recipient of the Wallenberg Medal is invited to present a lecture at the University of Michigan. The medalists take the stage at Rackham Auditorium and share their stories with an audience drawn from our campus and many surrounding communities. Each Lecture is different. In some years, survivors of Nazi persecution recounted their physical resistance in face of hellish danger. In others, medalists considered the effect over the years that the bravery of friends and family has had on the course of history. Lectures have been given by politicians who explain why they resisted unjust governments and, in turn, worked to develop a new order, honoring their personal vision with decades of public service. Some medalists have focused on their missions: to reject a life of wealth and rescue people who are literally slaves of corrupt businesses; to devote a life to the non-violent and peaceful pursuit of human rights. What the Wallenberg Lecturers have in common is their ability to inspire all with their vision, and the reality of their strength to act upon that vision. Here is the power of an eyewitness account to convince us that, although evil truly occurs, with moral courage individual actions effect a change in the world. In their Lectures, the Wallenberg medalists reveal a common characteristic: they acted selflessly without expectation of reward. The Lectures are profiles of moral excellence in ordinary people. The words of the medalists help us to imagine how it is that some can see all people as human; they share a vision of human dignity. http://www.wallenberg.umich.edu/gunnoe.html
Søren Kierkegaard | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Søren Kierkegaard Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Søren Aabye Kierkegaard ( SORR-ən KEER-kə-gard; Danish: [sɶːɐn ˈkiɐ̯ɡəɡɒːˀ] (listen); 5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher. He wrote critical texts on organized religion, Christendom, morality, ethics, psychology, and the philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables. Much of his philosophical work deals with the issues of how one lives as a "single individual", giving priority to concrete human reality over abstract thinking and highlighting the importance of personal choice and commitment. He was against literary critics who defined idealist intellectuals and philosophers of his time, and thought that Swedenborg, Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Schlegel and Hans Christian Andersen were all "understood" far too quickly by "scholars".Kierkegaard's theological work focuses on Christian ethics, the institution of the Church, the differences between purely objective proofs of Christianity, the infinite qualitative distinction between man and God, and the individual's subjective relationship to the God-Man Jesus the Christ, which came through faith. Much of his work deals with Christian love. He was extremely critical of the practice of Christianity as a state religion, primarily that of the Church of Denmark. His psychological work explored the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices.Kierkegaard's early work was written under the various pseudonyms that he used to present distinctive viewpoints and to interact with each other in complex dialogue. He explored particularly complex problems from different viewpoints, each under a different pseudonym. He wrote many Upbuilding Discourses under his own name and dedicated them to the "single individual" who might want to discover the meaning of his works. Notably, he wrote: "Science and scholarship want to teach that becoming objective is the way. Christianity teaches that the way is to become subjective, to become a subject." While scientists can learn about the world by observation, Kierkegaard emphatically denied that observation could reveal the inner workings of the world of the spirit.Some of Kierkegaard's key ideas include the concept of "subjective and objective truths", the knight of faith, the recollection and repetition dichotomy, angst, the infinite qualitative distinction, faith as a passion, and the three stages on life's way. Kierkegaard wrote in Danish and the reception of his work was initially limited to Scandinavia, but by the turn of the 20th century his writings were translated into French, German, and other major European languages. By the mid-20th century, his thought exerted a substantial influence on philosophy, theology, and Western culture.
Views: 57 wikipedia tts
The Two Alpacas | Tube Life S01 * E38  on Puša Studios
 
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Martin and Larra Bush, better known as The Two Alpacas are a husband and wife that love to share their travels and daily life on video. Started their Youtube adventure 3 months ago and have grown to have recurring series like Music Monday, Sunday Funday and so much more! 📌 Follow The Two Alpacas: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7H2Q-KdlAyU1Yn-Rt41upA https://twitter.com/thetwoalpacas About Puša Studios: We are a husband-wife team based out of \ Montreal Canada specializing in affordable, high-quality photography/videography + post-production and coloring for all social occasions, cooperate and B-roll. Plus, We have Introduced our new live streams, a great way to meet youtubers just like you, learn about them, meet lots of great supportive people in the chat and gain some great tips and tricks on shooting, editing and post and how to grow on the platform. Cheers and Keep creating! Get in touch with us! Email: [email protected] Twitter: https://twitter.com/pusastudios Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pusastudios/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/pusastudios Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pusastudios/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.ca/pusastudios/ #LiveWithPusa #bluewrenchgroup
Views: 320 Pusa Studios
The River of Healing
 
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On December 4, 2012, the Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program will launch a new video called "The River of Healing." The Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program coordinator Jody Cotter produced the video that focuses on harm reduction in drug use. "We focus on positive solutions such as youth prevention programs and strategies that help educate our people on the prevention of transmittable diseases such as Hepatitis C and HIV through unsafe drug use," says Cotter. "The video emphasizes the positive effects, such as healing, that can be brought about through effective methods of harm reduction. The aim of this video is to reduce the stigma and discrimination associated with drug use in our communities." The video launch is in conjunction with the HIV/AIDS "Little Spirit Moon" conference held December 4-5 in Toronto. Produced by The Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program in collaboration with Regan Pictures, The River of Healing features the participation of the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network, the Ontario Aboriginal HIV/ AIDS Strategy, Nurture North, the AIDS Committee of North Bay and Area, and others impacted by HIV/AIDS. Funding for The River of Healing was provided by Health Canada and the Ontario Ministry of Health AIDS Bureau. For more information about the Union of Ontario Indians HIV/AIDS program, visit http://www.anishinabek.ca/hiv-aids.asp
Views: 5768 Anishinabek Nation
Benjamin Madly on "An American Genocide"
 
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The 2017 BYU Butler Conference was given by Benjamin Madly, author of "An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe." Hosted by BYU's Charles Redd Center.
Views: 26 FHSSVideos
Mining
 
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Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 258 encyclopediacc
SILK ROAD - WikiVidi Documentary
 
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The Silk Road or Silk Route was an ancient network of trade routes that were for centuries central to cultural interaction originally through regions of Eurasia connecting the East and West and stretching from the Korean peninsula and Japan to the Mediterranean Sea. The Silk Road concept refers to both the terrestrial and the maritime routes connecting Asia and Europe. The overland Steppe route stretching through the Eurasian steppe is considered the ancestor to the Silk Road. While the term is of modern coinage, the Silk Road derives its name from the lucrative trade in silk carried out along its length, beginning during the Han dynasty . The Han dynasty expanded Central Asian sections of the trade routes around 114 BCE, largely through missions and explorations of the Chinese imperial envoy, Zhang Qian. The Chinese took great interest in the safety of their trade products and extended the Great Wall of China to ensure the protection of the trade route. Trade on the Silk Road playe... http://www.wikividi.com ____________________________________ Shortcuts to chapters: 00:02:29: Name 00:04:34: Chinese and Central Asian contacts 00:08:12: Persian Royal Road 00:08:52: Hellenistic era 00:10:30: Chinese exploration of Central Asia 00:19:10: Roman Empire 00:23:02: Byzantine Empire 00:26:50: Tang dynasty reopens the route 00:29:41: Medieval 00:33:20: Islamic era and the Silk Road 00:35:54: Mongol age 00:38:52: Decline and disintegration 00:39:58: New Silk Road 00:42:34: Routes 00:42:55: Northern route 00:44:37: Southern route 00:45:57: Southwestern route 00:48:02: Maritime route 00:48:59: Cultural exchanges 00:50:33: Transmission of Christianity 00:51:01: Transmission of Buddhism 00:57:13: Transmission of art ____________________________________ Copyright WikiVidi. Licensed under Creative Commons. Wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk_Road
An Insider's Scoop on America's National Parks (1802)
 
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2017 Conference on World Affairs, Monday, April 10, 2017 CU Boulder campus To request captions or transcripts, please contact [email protected]
Mining | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:51 1 History 00:02:00 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:18 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:31 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:15 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:23 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:36 1.6 The Americas 00:16:44 1.7 Modern period 00:18:22 2 Mine development and life cycle 00:21:09 3 Mining techniques 00:22:39 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:44 3.2 Underground mining 00:25:16 3.3 Highwall mining 00:27:02 4 Machines 00:28:27 5 Processing 00:31:18 6 Environmental effects 00:35:27 6.1 Waste 00:38:00 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:38:45 7 Mining industry 00:43:04 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:43:54 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:47:59 7.3 World Bank 00:50:07 8 Safety 00:53:52 9 Records 00:56:26 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9838512602070575 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an ore body, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or feasibly created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Historical Materialism  | Historical Materialism Explained
 
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Historical materialism is a methodological approach of Marxist historiography that focuses on human societies and their development over time, claiming that they follow a number of deterministic laws. This was first articulated by Karl Marx (1818–1883) as the materialist conception of history. It is principally a theory of history according to which the material conditions of a society's way of producing and reproducing the means of human existence or, in Marxist terms, the union of its productive capacity and social relations of production, fundamentally determine its organization and development. ………………………………………………………………………………….. Sources: Text: Text of this video has been taken from Wikipedia, which is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans The Lounge: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/jazz Images: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com …………………………………………………………………………………..
Views: 755 Free Audio Books
List of slaves | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: List of slaves 00:00:26 1 A 00:08:00 2 B 00:11:53 3 C 00:16:41 4 D 00:19:41 5 E 00:24:22 6 F 00:25:49 7 G 00:28:57 8 H 00:31:33 9 I 00:33:14 10 J 00:42:19 11 K 00:43:42 12 L 00:47:16 13 M 00:55:40 14 N 00:57:32 15 O 00:58:59 16 P 01:03:58 17 Q 01:04:33 18 R 01:07:44 19 S 01:13:20 20 T 01:16:29 21 U 01:16:50 22 V 01:18:53 23 W 01:21:12 24 X 01:21:25 25 Y 01:22:32 26 Z 01:23:45 27 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Slavery is a social-economic system under which persons are enslaved: deprived of personal freedom and forced to perform labor or services without compensation. These people are referred to as slaves. The following is a list of historical people who were enslaved at some point during their lives, in alphabetical order by first name. Several names have been added under the letter representing the person's last name.
Views: 130 wikipedia tts
Gold Coast (British colony) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Gold Coast (British colony) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Gold Coast was a British colony on the Gulf of Guinea in west Africa from 1867 to its independence as the nation of Ghana in 1957. The first Europeans to arrive at the coast were the Portuguese in 1471. They encountered a variety of African kingdoms, some of which controlled substantial deposits of gold in the soil. The kingdoms had a tradition of enslaving captives taken in warfare. Some were sold to Arab traders from North Africa and transported to Islamic Mediterranean civilizations. In 1482, the Portuguese came to the continent for increased trade. They built the Castle of Elmina, the first European settlement on the Gold Coast. From here they acquired slaves and gold in trade for European goods, such as metal knives, beads, mirrors, rum, and guns. News of the successful trading spread quickly, and British, Dutch, Danish, Prussian and Swedish traders arrived as well. The European traders built several forts along the coastline. The Gold Coast had long been a name for the region used by Europeans because of the large gold resources found in the area. The slave trade was the principal exchange and major part of the economy for many years. In this period, European nations began to explore and colonize the Americas. Soon the Portuguese and Spanish began to export African slaves to the Caribbean, and North and South America. The Dutch and British also entered the slave trade, at first supplying markets in the Caribbean and on the Caribbean coast of South America. The Royal Trading Company was established by the Crown in 1752 to lead its trading in Africa. It was replaced by the African Company of Merchants, which led the British trading efforts into the early 19th century. In 1821 the British government withdrew their charter and seized privately held lands along the coast. In 1867 the government formed the British Gold Coast colony, after having taken over the remaining interests of other European countries. They purchased and incorporated the Danish Gold Coast in 1850 and the Dutch Gold Coast, including Fort Elmina, in 1872. Britain steadily expanded its colony through the invasion and subjection of local kingdoms as well, particularly the Ashanti and Fante confederacies. The Ashanti people had controlled much of the territory of Ghana before the Europeans arrived and were often in conflict with them. In the 21st century they continue to constitute the largest ethnic community in Ghana. Four wars, the Anglo-Ashanti Wars, were fought between the Ashanti (Asante) and the British, who were sometimes allied with the Fante. During the First Anglo-Ashanti War (1822–24), the two groups fought because of a disagreement over an Ashanti chief and slavery. The British had abolished the Atlantic slave trade but kept the institution in its colonies until 1834. Tensions increased in 1874 during the Second Ashanti War (1873–74) when the British sacked the Ashanti capital of Kumasi. The Third Ashanti War (1893–94) occurred because the new Ashanti ruler Asantehene wanted to exercise his new title. From 1895–96 the British and Ashanti fought in the Fourth and final Ashanti War, where the Ashanti fought for and lost their independence. In 1900 the Ashanti Uprising took place. The British suppressed the violence and captured of the city of Kumasi. At the end of this last Ashanti War, the territory of the Ashanti people became a British protectorate on 1 January 1902. By 1901, British had established a colony incorporating all of the Gold Coast, with its kingdoms and tribes considered a single unit. The British exploited and exported a variety of natural resources such as gold, metal ores, diamonds, ivory, pepper, timber, grain and cocoa. The British colonists built railways and a complex transport infrastructure to support the shipment of such commodity goods. This has formed the basis for the transport infrastructure in modern-day Ghana. They also built Weste ...
Views: 52 wikipedia tts
Timeline of Russian inventions and technology records | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Timeline of Russian inventions and technology records 00:01:07 1 Early East Slavs 00:07:36 2 Kievan Rus' 00:07:45 2.1 10th century 00:11:15 2.2 11th century 00:15:10 2.3 12th century 00:17:34 2.4 13th century 00:19:22 3 Grand Duchy of Moscow 00:19:31 3.1 14th century 00:22:30 3.2 15th century 00:27:48 3.3 Early 16th century 00:29:36 4 Tsardom of Russia 00:29:45 4.1 Late 16th century 00:34:44 4.2 17th century 00:42:50 4.3 Early 18th century 00:45:24 5 Russian Empire 00:45:33 5.1 1720s 00:46:22 5.2 1730s 00:49:21 5.3 1740s 00:49:35 5.4 1750s 00:50:04 5.5 1760s 00:50:36 5.6 1770s 00:52:21 5.7 1780s 00:52:35 5.8 1790s 00:53:44 5.9 19th century 00:54:20 5.10 1810s 00:54:44 5.11 1820s 00:55:27 5.12 1830s 00:56:17 5.13 1840s 00:56:36 5.14 1850s 00:58:51 5.15 1860s 01:00:01 5.16 1870s 01:02:51 5.17 1880s 01:05:35 5.18 1890s 01:07:46 5.19 20th century 01:10:02 5.20 1910s 01:12:47 6 Soviet Union 01:12:56 6.1 Late 1910s 01:13:50 6.2 1920s 01:16:14 6.3 1930s 01:23:47 6.4 1940s 01:27:01 6.5 1950s 01:32:10 6.6 1960s 01:36:56 6.7 1970s 01:40:20 6.8 1980s 01:42:35 6.9 Early 1990s 01:43:54 7 Russian Federation 01:44:04 7.1 1990s 01:45:57 7.2 2000s 01:48:09 7.3 2010s 01:48:52 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Timeline of Russian Innovation encompasses key events in the history of technology in Russia, starting from the Early East Slavs and up to the Russian Federation. The entries in this timeline fall into the following categories: Indigenous inventions, like airliners, AC transformers, radio receivers, television, artificial satellites, ICBMs Products and objects that are uniquely Russian, like Saint Basil's Cathedral, Matryoshka dolls, Russian vodka Products and objects with superlative characteristics, like the Tsar Bomba, the AK-47, and Typhoon class submarine Scientific and medical discoveries, like the periodic law, vitamins and stem cellsThis timeline examines scientific and medical discoveries, products and technologies introduced by various peoples of Russia and its predecessor states, regardless of ethnicity, and also lists inventions by naturalized immigrant citizens. Certain innovations achieved by a national operation may also may be included in this timeline, in cases where the Russian side played a major role in such projects.
Views: 82 wikipedia tts
American Indian Wars | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: American Indian Wars Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The American Indian Wars (or Indian Wars) is the collective name for the various armed conflicts fought by European governments and colonists, and later the United States government and American settlers, against various American Indian tribes. These conflicts occurred within the United States and Canada from the time of the earliest colonial settlements in the 17th century until the 1920s. The various Indian Wars resulted from a wide variety of sources, including cultural clashes, land disputes, and criminal acts committed on both sides. European powers and the colonies also enlisted Indian tribes to help them conduct warfare against one another's colonial settlements. After the American Revolution, many conflicts were local to specific states or regions and frequently involved disputes over land use; some entailed cycles of violent reprisal. The British Royal Proclamation of 1763 included in the Constitution of Canada prohibited white settlers from taking the lands of indigenous peoples in Canada without signing a treaty with them. It continues to be the law in Canada today, and 11 Numbered Treaties covering most of the First Nations lands limited the number of such conflicts. As white settlers spread westward after 1780, the size, duration, and intensity of armed conflicts increased between settlers and Indians. The climax came in the War of 1812, which resulted in the defeat of major Indian coalitions in the Midwest and the South, and conflict with settlers became much less common. Conflicts were resolved by treaty, often through sale or exchange of territory between the federal government and specific tribes. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 authorized the US government to enforce the Indian removal east of the Mississippi River to the other side of the sparsely populated American frontier. The policy of removal was eventually refined to relocate Indian tribes to specially designated and federally protected reservations.
Views: 51 wikipedia tts
British Raj | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: British Raj Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The British Raj (; from rāj, literally, "rule" in Hindustani) was the rule by the British Crown in the Indian subcontinent between 1858 and 1947. The rule is also called Crown rule in India, or direct rule in India. The region under British control was commonly called British India or simply India in contemporaneous usage, and included areas directly administered by the United Kingdom, which were collectively called British India, and those ruled by indigenous rulers, but under British tutelage or paramountcy, and called the princely states. The whole was also informally called the Indian Empire. As India, it was a founding member of the League of Nations, a participating nation in the Summer Olympics in 1900, 1920, 1928, 1932, and 1936, and a founding member of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945.This system of governance was instituted on 28 June 1858, when, after the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the rule of the British East India Company was transferred to the Crown in the person of Queen Victoria (who, in 1876, was proclaimed Empress of India). It lasted until 1947, when it was partitioned into two sovereign dominion states: the Dominion of India (later the Republic of India) and the Dominion of Pakistan (later the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, the eastern part of which, still later, became the People's Republic of Bangladesh). At the inception of the Raj in 1858, Lower Burma was already a part of British India; Upper Burma was added in 1886, and the resulting union, Burma, was administered as an autonomous province until 1937, when it became a separate British colony, gaining its own independence in 1948.
Views: 46 wikipedia tts
A Matter of Logic / Bring on the Angels / The Stronger
 
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The Stronger (Swedish: Den starkare) is a famous 1889 play by August Strindberg. The play is quite short, consisting of only one scene that can be performed in approximately 10 minutes. The characters consist of only two women: a "Mrs. X" and a "Miss. Y", only one of whom speak, an example of a dramatic monologue. It was adapted into a 1952 opera by composer Hugo Weisgall and there have been numerous film and television adaptations of the work. It has also been expanded and adapted into a forty-minute English-language zarzuela with a Madrid setting by Derek Barnes (2010), with text by Christopher Webber. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stronger Johan August Strindberg (22 January 1849 -- 14 May 1912) was a Swedish playwright, novelist, poet, essayist and painter.[2][3][4] A prolific writer who often drew directly on his personal experience, Strindberg's career spanned four decades, during which time he wrote over 60 plays and more than 30 works of fiction, autobiography, history, cultural analysis, and politics.[5] A bold experimenter and iconoclast throughout, he explored a wide range of dramatic methods and purposes, from naturalistic tragedy, monodrama, and history plays, to his anticipations of expressionist and surrealist dramatic techniques.[6][7] From his earliest work, Strindberg developed forms of dramatic action, language, and visual composition so innovative that many were to become technically possible to stage only with the advent of film.[8] He is considered the "father" of modern Swedish literature and his The Red Room (1879) has frequently been described as the first modern Swedish novel.[9][10] In Sweden Strindberg is both known as a novelist and a playwright, but in most other countries he is almost only known as a playwright. The Royal Theatre rejected his first major play, Master Olof, in 1872; it was not until 1881, at the age of 32, that its première at the New Theatre gave him his theatrical breakthrough.[2][11] In his plays The Father (1887), Miss Julie (1888), and Creditors (1889), he created naturalistic dramas that -- building on the established accomplishments of Henrik Ibsen's prose problem plays while rejecting their use of the structure of the well-made play — responded to the call-to-arms of Émile Zola's manifesto "Naturalism in the Theatre" (1881) and the example set by André Antoine's newly established Théâtre Libre (opened 1887).[12] In Miss Julie, characterisation replaces plot as the predominant dramatic element (in contrast to melodrama and the well-made play) and the determining role of heredity and the environment on the "vacillating, disintegrated" characters is emphasised.[13] Strindberg modelled his short-lived Scandinavian Experimental Theatre (1889) in Copenhagen on Antoine's theatre and he explored the theory of Naturalism in his essays "On Psychic Murder" (1887), "On Modern Drama and the Modern Theatre" (1889), and a preface to Miss Julie, the last of which is probably the best-known statement of the principles of the theatrical movement.[14] During the 1890s he spent significant time abroad engaged in scientific experiments and studies of the occult.[15] A series of psychotic attacks between 1894 to 1896 (referred to as his "Inferno crisis") led to his hospitalisation and return to Sweden.[15] Under the influence of the ideas of Emanuel Swedenborg, he resolved after his recovery to become "the Zola of the Occult."[16] In 1898 he returned to playwriting with To Damascus, which, like The Great Highway (1909), is a dream-play of spiritual pilgrimage.[17] His A Dream Play (1902) — with its radical attempt to dramatise the workings of the unconscious by means of an abolition of conventional dramatic time and space and the splitting, doubling, merging, and multiplication of its characters -- was an important precursor to both expressionism and surrealism.[18] He also returned to writing historical drama, the genre with which he had begun his playwriting career.[19] He helped to run the Intimate Theatre from 1907, a small-scale theatre, modelled on Max Reinhardt's Kammerspielhaus, that staged his chamber plays (such as The Ghost Sonata). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_Strindberg
Views: 213616 Remember This
Eritrea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Eritrea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Eritrea (; ( listen)), , officially the State of Eritrea is a country in the Horn of Africa, with its capital at Asmara. It is bordered by Sudan in the west, Ethiopia in the south, and Djibouti in the southeast. The northeastern and eastern parts of Eritrea have an extensive coastline along the Red Sea. The nation has a total area of approximately 117,600 km2 (45,406 sq mi), and includes the Dahlak Archipelago and several of the Hanish Islands. Its toponym Eritrea is based on the Greek name for the Red Sea (Ἐρυθρὰ Θάλασσα Erythra Thalassa), which was first adopted for Italian Eritrea in 1890. Eritrea is a multi-ethnic country, with nine recognized ethnic groups in its population of around 5 million. Most residents speak languages from the Afroasiatic family, either of the Ethiopian Semitic languages or Cushitic branches. Among these communities, the Tigrinyas make up about 55% of the population, with the Tigre people constituting around 30% of inhabitants. In addition, there are a number of Nilo-Saharan-speaking Nilotic ethnic minorities. Most people in the territory adhere to Christianity or Islam.The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and northern Ethiopia, was established during the first or second centuries AD. It adopted Christianity around the middle of the fourth century. In medieval times much of Eritrea fell under the Medri Bahri kingdom, with a smaller region being part of Hamasien. The creation of modern-day Eritrea is a result of the incorporation of independent, distinct kingdoms and sultanates (for example, Medri Bahri and the Sultanate of Aussa) eventually resulting in the formation of Italian Eritrea. After the defeat of the Italian colonial army in 1942, Eritrea was administered by the British Military Administration until 1952. Following the UN General Assembly decision, in 1952, Eritrea would govern itself with a local Eritrean parliament but for foreign affairs and defense it would enter into a federal status with Ethiopia for a period of 10 years. However, in 1962 the government of Ethiopia annulled the Eritrean parliament and formally annexed Eritrea. But the Eritreans that argued for complete Eritrean independence since the ouster of the Italians in 1941, anticipated what was coming and in 1960 organized the Eritrean Liberation Front in opposition. In 1991, after 30 years of continuous armed struggle for independence, the Eritrean liberation fighters entered the capital city, Asmara, in victory. Eritrea is a one-party state in which national legislative elections have never been held since independence. According to Human Rights Watch, the Eritrean government's human rights record is among the worst in the world. The Eritrean government has dismissed these allegations as politically motivated. The compulsory military service requires long, indefinite conscription periods, which some Eritreans leave the country to avoid. Because all local media is state-owned, Eritrea was also ranked as having the second-least press freedom in the global Press Freedom Index, behind only North Korea. The sovereign state of Eritrea is a member of the African Union, the United Nations, and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, and is an observer in the Arab League alongside Brazil, Venezuela, India and Turkey.
Views: 105 wikipedia tts
Henri Poincaré | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Henri Poincaré Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Jules Henri Poincaré (; French: [ɑ̃ʁi pwɛ̃kaʁe] (listen); 29 April 1854 – 17 July 1912) was a French mathematician, theoretical physicist, engineer, and philosopher of science. He is often described as a polymath, and in mathematics as "The Last Universalist," since he excelled in all fields of the discipline as it existed during his lifetime. As a mathematician and physicist, he made many original fundamental contributions to pure and applied mathematics, mathematical physics, and celestial mechanics. He was responsible for formulating the Poincaré conjecture, which was one of the most famous unsolved problems in mathematics until it was solved in 2002–2003 by Grigori Perelman. In his research on the three-body problem, Poincaré became the first person to discover a chaotic deterministic system which laid the foundations of modern chaos theory. He is also considered to be one of the founders of the field of topology. Poincaré made clear the importance of paying attention to the invariance of laws of physics under different transformations, and was the first to present the Lorentz transformations in their modern symmetrical form. Poincaré discovered the remaining relativistic velocity transformations and recorded them in a letter to Hendrik Lorentz in 1905. Thus he obtained perfect invariance of all of Maxwell's equations, an important step in the formulation of the theory of special relativity. In 1905, Poincaré first proposed gravitational waves (ondes gravifiques) emanating from a body and propagating at the speed of light as being required by the Lorentz transformations. The Poincaré group used in physics and mathematics was named after him.
Views: 41 Shishir Kumar Sahu
Benjamin Harrison
 
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Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States (1889–1893); he was the grandson of the ninth President, William Henry Harrison. Harrison had become a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader and politician in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union for most of the war as a colonel and on February 14, 1865 was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers to rank from January 23, 1865. Afterwards, he unsuccessfully ran for the governorship of Indiana but was later elected to the U.S. Senate by the Indiana legislature. Harrison, a Republican, was elected to the presidency in 1888, defeating the Democratic incumbent Grover Cleveland. Hallmarks of his administration included unprecedented economic legislation, including the McKinley Tariff, which imposed historic protective trade rates, and the Sherman Antitrust Act; Harrison facilitated the creation of the National Forests through an amendment to the Land Revision Act of 1891. He also substantially strengthened and modernized the Navy, and conducted an active foreign policy. He proposed, in vain, federal education funding as well as voting rights enforcement for African Americans during his administration. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1334 Audiopedia
Timeline of United States military operations | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Timeline of United States military operations 00:00:33 1 Extraterritorial and major domestic deployments 00:00:52 1.1 1775–1799 00:03:29 1.2 1800–1809 00:04:53 1.3 1810–1819 00:09:13 1.4 1820–1829 00:10:43 1.5 1830–1839 00:13:10 1.6 1840–1849 00:15:56 1.7 1850–1859 00:21:11 1.8 1860–1869 00:24:21 1.9 1870–1879 00:26:21 1.10 1880–1889 00:27:54 1.11 1890–1899 00:32:44 1.12 1900–1909 00:36:24 1.13 1910–1919 00:44:36 1.14 1920–1929 00:48:10 1.15 1930–1939 00:49:03 1.16 1940–1944 00:50:41 1.17 1945–1949 00:53:01 1.18 1950–1959 00:56:15 1.19 1960–1969 00:58:50 1.20 1970–1979 01:02:00 1.21 1980–1989 01:12:01 1.22 1990–1999 01:22:28 1.23 2000–2009 01:27:43 1.24 2010–present 01:34:18 2 Battles with the Native Americans 01:34:36 3 Relocation 01:35:09 4 Armed insurrections and slave revolts 01:37:14 5 Range wars 01:38:06 6 Bloody local feuds 01:38:25 7 Bloodless boundary disputes 01:39:13 8 Terrorist, paramilitary groups and guerrilla warfare 01:39:25 8.1 18th and 19th century 01:40:12 9 Labor–management disputes 01:40:47 10 State and national secession attempts 01:41:25 11 Riots and public disorder 01:41:48 12 Miscellaneous 01:43:01 12.1 Latter-day Saints 01:43:16 12.2 Republic of Texas 01:43:33 13 See also 01:43:42 14 Notes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This timeline of United States government military operations is based on the Committee on International Relations (now known as the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs). Dates show the years in which U.S. government military units participated. Items in bold are the U.S. government wars most often considered to be major conflicts by historians and the general public. Note that instances where the U.S. government gave aid alone, with no military personnel involvement, are excluded, as are Central Intelligence Agency operations.
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Labor history of the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_history_of_the_United_States 00:03:16 1 Organized labor prior to 1900 00:04:31 1.1 Legality and iHunt/i (1842) 00:13:33 1.2 Early federations 00:15:17 1.3 Railroad brotherhoods 00:17:21 1.4 Knights of Labor 00:20:45 1.5 American Federation of Labor 00:24:58 1.6 Western Federation of Miners 00:26:28 1.7 Pullman Strike 00:29:10 1.8 Labor Exchanges and Tokens 00:30:49 2 Organized labor 1900–1920 00:32:45 2.1 Coal strikes, 1900–1902 00:33:34 2.2 Women's Trade Union League 00:34:47 2.3 Industrial Workers of the World 00:37:29 2.4 Government and labor 00:40:26 2.5 World War I 00:41:56 2.6 Strikes of 1919 00:42:39 2.6.1 Coal Strike of 1919 00:44:18 2.6.2 Women telephone operators win strike in 1919 00:45:28 3 Weakness of organized labor 1920–1929 00:49:36 3.1 Great Railroad Strike of 1922 00:51:23 4 Organized labor 1929–1955 00:51:38 4.1 The Great Depression and organized labor 00:53:46 4.2 The Norris-La Guardia Anti-Injunction Act of 1932 00:55:33 4.3 FDR and the National Industrial Recovery Act 00:59:30 4.4 The American Federation of Labor: craft unionism vs. industrial unionism 01:02:04 4.5 John L. Lewis and the CIO 01:06:59 4.6 Upsurge in World War II 01:09:45 4.7 Walter Reuther and UAW 01:10:49 4.8 PAC and politics of 1940s 01:12:04 4.8.1 Strike wave of 1945 01:15:18 4.9 Taft-Hartley Act 01:21:19 4.10 Anti-communism 01:24:11 5 Union decline 1955–2016 01:29:03 5.1 AFL and CIO merger 1955 01:32:49 5.2 Conservative attacks 01:35:34 5.3 Civil Rights Movement 01:35:57 5.4 United Farm Workers, 1960s 01:39:24 5.5 Reagan era, 1980s 01:42:26 5.6 Decline of private sector unions 01:44:04 6 2016–present 01:45:29 6.1 Teacher strikes 01:46:44 7 Public-sector unions 01:49:26 7.1 New Deal era 01:50:34 7.2 "Little New Deal" era 01:51:49 7.3 Recent years 01:53:28 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7485380080636301 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The labor history of the United States describes the history of organized labor, US labor law, and more general history of working people, in the United States. Beginning in the 1930s, unions became important components of the Democratic Party. However, some historians have not understood why no Labor Party emerged in the United States, in contrast to Western Europe.The nature and power of organized labor is the outcome of historical tensions among counter-acting forces involving workplace rights, wages, working hours, political expression, labor laws, and other working conditions. Organized unions and their umbrella labor federations such as the AFL–CIO and citywide federations have competed, evolved, merged, and split against a backdrop of changing values and priorities, and periodic federal government intervention. As commentator E. J. Dionne has noted, the union movement has traditionally espoused a set of values—solidarity being the most important, the sense that each should look out for the interests of all. From this followed commitments to mutual assistance, to a rough-and-ready sense of equality, to a disdain for elitism, and to a belief that democracy and individual rights did not stop at the plant gate or the office reception room. Dionne notes that these values are "increasingly foreign to American culture". In most industrial nations the labor movement sponsored its own political parties, with the U.S. as a conspicuous exception. Both major American parties vied for union votes, with the Democrats usually much more successful. Labor unions became a central element of the New Deal Coalition that dominated national politics from the 1930s into the mid-1960s during the Fifth Party System. Liberal Republicans who supported unions in the Northeast lost power after 1964.The history of organized labor has been a specialty of scholars since the 1890s, and has produced a large amount of scholarly literature fo ...
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History of Germany | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Germany 00:06:46 1 Prehistory 00:08:00 2 Germanic tribes, 750 BC – 768 AD 00:08:13 2.1 Migration and conquest 00:11:16 2.2 Stem Duchies and Marches 00:12:56 2.3 Frankish Empire 00:16:44 3 Middle Ages 00:16:52 3.1 Foundation of the Holy Roman Empire 00:18:17 3.2 Otto the Great 00:20:54 3.3 Hanseatic League 00:21:36 3.4 Eastward expansion 00:22:10 3.5 Church and state 00:26:25 3.6 Change and reform 00:28:11 3.7 Towns and cities 00:30:00 3.8 Women 00:31:15 3.9 Science and culture 00:32:56 4 Early modern Germany 00:33:11 4.1 Reformation 00:35:56 4.2 Thirty Years War, 1618–1648 00:37:55 4.3 Culture and literacy 00:39:54 4.4 Science 00:40:53 5 1648–1815 00:41:58 5.1 Wars 00:44:14 5.2 Smaller states 00:46:45 5.3 Nobility 00:47:38 5.4 Peasants and rural life 00:50:59 5.5 Bourgeois values spread to rural Germany 00:52:39 5.6 Enlightenment 00:55:39 5.6.1 Women 00:56:50 5.7 French Revolution, 1789–1815 01:00:44 6 1815–1867 01:00:55 6.1 Overview 01:01:53 6.2 German Confederation 01:02:50 6.3 Society and economy 01:02:59 6.3.1 Population 01:04:19 6.3.2 Industrialization 01:05:54 6.3.3 Urbanization 01:07:00 6.3.4 Railways 01:08:46 6.3.5 Newspapers and magazines 01:09:51 6.3.6 Science and culture 01:12:27 6.3.7 Religion 01:15:35 6.4 Politics of restoration and revolution 01:15:45 6.4.1 After Napoleon 01:17:43 6.4.2 1848 01:18:32 6.4.3 1850s 01:19:12 6.4.4 Bismarck takes charge, 1862–1866 01:21:13 6.4.5 North German Federation, 1866–1871 01:21:54 7 German Empire, 1871–1918 01:22:06 7.1 Overview 01:23:53 7.2 Age of Bismarck 01:24:01 7.2.1 The new empire 01:27:33 7.2.2 Classes 01:27:41 7.2.2.1 Aristocracy 01:29:50 7.2.2.2 Middle class 01:30:35 7.2.2.3 Working class 01:31:52 7.2.3 Kulturkampf 01:34:14 7.2.4 Foreign policy 01:37:06 7.3 Wilhelminian Era 01:37:14 7.3.1 Wilhelm II. 01:38:08 7.3.2 Alliances and diplomacy 01:41:05 7.3.3 Economy 01:43:20 7.3.4 Women 01:44:33 7.3.5 Colonies 01:45:24 7.4 World War I 01:45:33 7.4.1 Causes 01:47:13 7.4.2 Western Front 01:48:17 7.4.3 Eastern Front 01:49:13 7.4.4 1918 01:50:01 7.5 Homefront 01:51:17 7.6 Revolution 1918 01:54:40 8 Weimar Republic, 1919–1933 01:54:52 8.1 Overview 01:56:08 8.2 The early years 01:59:27 8.3 Reparations 02:00:47 8.4 Economic collapse and political problems, 1929–1933 02:02:58 8.5 Science and culture 02:04:48 9 Nazi Germany, 1933–1945 02:06:25 9.1 Establishment of the Nazi regime 02:10:20 9.2 Antisemitism and the Holocaust 02:12:30 9.3 Military 02:13:23 9.4 Women 02:15:27 9.5 Foreign policy 02:18:01 9.6 World War II 02:20:34 10 Germany during the Cold War, 1945–1990 02:21:45 10.1 Post-war chaos 02:26:02 10.2 East Germany 02:30:08 10.3 West Germany (Bonn Republic) 02:31:10 10.3.1 Economic miracle 02:32:28 10.3.2 1948 currency reform 02:34:38 10.3.3 Adenauer 02:35:34 10.3.4 Erhard 02:37:26 10.3.5 Grand coalition 02:38:06 10.3.6 Guest workers 02:39:09 10.3.7 Brandt and Ostpolitik 02:40:33 10.3.8 Economic crisis of 1970s 02:43:13 10.4 Kohl 02:43:59 10.5 Reunification 02:45:13 11 Federal Republic of Germany, 1990–present 02:45:24 11.1 Schröder 02:46:21 11.2 Merkel 02:49:01 12 Historiography 02:49:10 12.1 Sonderweg debate 02:50:38 13 See also 02:50:47 14 Notes 02:50:55 14.1 Footnotes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9630936642269607 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The concept of Germany as a distinct region in central Europe can be traced to Roman commander Julius Caesar, who referred to the unconquered area east of the Rhine as Germania, thus distinguishing it from Gaul (France), which he had conquered. The victory of the Germanic tribes in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (AD 9) prevented annexation by the Roman Empire, although the Roman provinces of Germania Superior and Germania Inferior were established along the Rhine. Following the Fall of the Western Roman Empire, the Franks conqu ...
Views: 109 wikipedia tts
Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne | Audio book with subtitles
 
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Around the World in Eighty Days (version 2) Read by Mark F. Smith. Jules VERNE , translated by UNKNOWN ( - ) Mysterious Phileas Fogg is a cool customer. A man of the most repetitious and punctual habit - with no apparent sense of adventure whatsoever - he gambles his considerable fortune that he can complete a journey around the world in just 80 days... immediately after a newspaper calculates the feat as just barely possible. With his excitable French manservant in tow, Fogg undertakes the exercise immediately, with no preparations, trusting that his traveling funds will make up for delays along the way. But unbeknownst to him, British police are desperately seeking to arrest him for the theft of a huge sum by someone who resembles him, and they will track him around the world, if necessary, to apprehend him. This is an adventure novel of the first water, with wholly unexpected perils, hair-breadth escapes, brilliant solutions to insoluble problems, and even a love story. And can this be? - That he returns to London just five minutes too late to win his wager and retain his fortune? (Summary by Mark F. Smith) Genre(s): Action & Adventure Fiction Chapters; 0:33 | Chapter 1 11:34 | Chapter 2 20:12 | Chapter 3 35:19 | Chapter 4 43:01 | Chapter 5 50:07 | Chapter 6 59:32 | Chapter 7 1:05:37 | Chapter 8 1:13:58 | Chapter 9 1:25:32 | Chapter 10 1:37:10 | Chapter 11 1:56:00 | Chapter 12 2:11:12 | Chapter 13 2:25:11 | Chapter 14 2:38:58 | Chapter 15 2:52:22 | Chapter 16 3:03:48 | Chapter 17 3:16:20 | Chapter 18 3:25:42 | Chapter 19 3:40:38 | Chapter 20 3:53:15 | Chapter 21 4:10:32 | Chapter 22 4:25:20 | Chapter 23 4:39:04 | Chapter 24 4:52:56 | Chapter 25 5:07:22 | Chapter 26 5:18:53 | Chapter 27 5:32:38 | Chapter 28 5:49:40 | Chapter 29 6:04:31 | Chapter 30 6:19:28 | Chapter 31 6:31:58 | Chapter 32 6:39:55 | Chapter 33 6:57:24 | Chapter 34 7:04:37 | Chapter 35 7:16:26 | Chapter 36 7:24:35 | Chapter 37 Audio Book Audiobooks All Rights Reserved. This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
Views: 1441 Audio book Audiobooks
White Brazilian
 
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White Brazilianɾuz ˈbɾɐ̃kus]) is a Brazilian citizen from European, or Levantine descent. According to the 2010 Census, they totaled 91,051,646 people, and made up to 47.73% of the Brazilian population. Most White Brazilians descend from 19th and 20th centuries immigration due to "Whitening policies" from the monarchical and early republican periods, smaller groups have their origin in the colonial period and postwar decades. The main European nationalities or White ethnicities in the country are Lusitanian or Portuguese, Italian, other Iberians or different Spaniards, German-Austrian and Luxembourger, Levantine Arab, Slavic, Dutch and Flemish, French and Walloon, Scandinavian, Baltic, British, Jewish, Hungarian, Finnish and Estonian, Greek, Armenian, Irish, and minorities like Russian Volga Tatar, Pamiri Afghan and other smaller groups of Caucasus peoples such as Georgian and Azerbaijani. Immigrating groups already in diaspora include White nationals from Argentina, Uruguay and Chile, as well as European ancestry Angolans. And the immigration of Europeans in diaspora has come to include in the past the American Confederate colonies in the 19th century, Dutch Surinamese or Boeroes after their country's independence and South African Boeren. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 477 Audiopedia
Imperial Japanese Navy | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:14:09
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Imperial Japanese Navy Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN; Kyūjitai: 大日本帝國海軍 Shinjitai: 大日本帝国海軍 Dai-Nippon Teikoku Kaigun "Navy of the Greater Japanese Empire", or 日本海軍 Nippon Kaigun, "Japanese Navy") was the navy of the Empire of Japan from 1868 until 1945, when it was dissolved following Japan's defeat and surrender in World War II. The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) was formed after the dissolution of the IJN.The Imperial Japanese Navy was the third largest navy in the world by 1920, behind the Royal Navy and the United States Navy (USN). It was supported by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service for aircraft and airstrike operation from the fleet. It was the primary opponent of the Western Allies in the Pacific War. The origins of the Imperial Japanese Navy go back to early interactions with nations on the Asian continent, beginning in the early medieval period and reaching a peak of activity during the 16th and 17th centuries at a time of cultural exchange with European powers during the Age of Discovery. After two centuries of stagnation during the country's ensuing seclusion policy under the shōguns of the Edo period, Japan's navy was comparatively backward when the country was forced open to trade by American intervention in 1854. This eventually led to the Meiji Restoration. Accompanying the re-ascendance of the Emperor came a period of frantic modernization and industrialization. The navy's history of successes, sometimes against much more powerful enemies as in the Sino-Japanese war and the Russo-Japanese War. The Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force was founded as a replacement two years after the end of the occupation of Japan.
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Technological and industrial history of the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Technological and industrial history of the United States Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The technological and industrial history of the United States describes the United States' emergence as one of the most technologically advanced nations in the world. The availability of land and literate labor, the absence of a landed aristocracy, the prestige of entrepreneurship, the diversity of climate and a large easily accessed upscale and literate free market all contributed to America's rapid industrialisation. The availability of capital, development by the free market of navigable rivers, and coastal waterways, and the abundance of natural resources facilitated the cheap extraction of energy all contributed to America's rapid industrialization. Fast transport by the very large railroad built in the mid-19th century, and the Interstate Highway System built in the late 20th century, enlarged the markets and reducing shipping and production costs. The legal system facilitated business operations and guaranteed contracts. Cut off from Europe by the embargo and the British blockade in the War of 1812 (1807–15), entrepreneurs opened factories in the Northeast that set the stage for rapid industrialization modeled on British innovations. From its emergence as an independent nation, the United States has encouraged science and innovation. As a result, the United States has been the birthplace of 161 of Britannica's 321 Greatest Inventions, including items such as the airplane, internet, microchip, laser, cellphone, refrigerator, email, microwave, personal computer, Liquid-crystal display and light-emitting diode technology, air conditioning, assembly line, supermarket, bar code, automated teller machine, and many more.The early technological and industrial development in the United States was facilitated by a unique confluence of geographical, social, and economic factors. The relative lack of workers kept United States wages nearly always higher than corresponding British and European workers and provided an incentive to mechanize some tasks. The United States population had some semi-unique advantages in that they were former British subjects, had high English literacy skills, for that period (over 80% in New England), had strong British institutions, with some minor American modifications, of courts, laws, right to vote, protection of property rights and in many cases personal contacts among the British innovators of the Industrial Revolution. They had a good basic structure to build on. Another major advantage, which the British lacked, was no inherited aristocratic institutions. The eastern seaboard of the United States, with a great number of rivers and streams along the Atlantic seaboard, provided many potential sites for constructing textile mills necessary for early industrialization. The technology and information on how to build a textile industry was largely provided by Samuel Slater (1768–1835) who emigrated to New England in 1789. He had studied and worked in British textile mills for a number of years and immigrated to the United States, despite restrictions against it, to try his luck with U.S. manufacturers who were trying to set up a textile industry. He was offered a full partnership if he could succeed—he did. A vast supply of natural resources, the technological knowledge on how to build and power the necessary machines along with a labor supply of mobile workers, often unmarried females, all aided early industrialization. The broad knowledge of the Industrial Revolution and Scientific revolution helped facilitate understanding for the construction and invention of new manufacturing businesses and technologies. A limited government that would allow them to succeed or fail on their own merit helped. After the close of the American Revolution in 1783, the new government continued the strong property rights established under British rule and established a rule of law necessary to protect those ...
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History of the United States Republican Party | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of the United States Republican Party 00:03:31 1 Ideological beginnings 00:07:27 2 Organizational beginnings 00:08:22 3 Establishing a national party and opposition 00:10:57 4 Civil War and Republican dominance: 1860–1896 00:12:46 4.1 Reconstruction: freedmen, carpetbaggers and scalawags 00:17:10 4.2 Gilded Age: 1877–1890 00:19:39 4.3 Ethnocultural politics: pietistic Republicans versus liturgical Democrats 00:22:04 5 Progressive Era: 1896–1932 00:28:04 6 Progressives and liberals 00:31:33 7 Political firsts for women and minorities 00:33:38 8 Fighting the New Deal coalition: 1932–1980 00:34:53 8.1 1933–1938 00:39:00 8.2 1939–1952 00:42:48 8.3 Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon: 1952–1974 00:43:57 8.4 Citizens for Eisenhower 00:45:58 8.5 Richard Nixon and Barry Goldwater 00:50:55 8.6 Moderate Republicans of 1960–1980 00:54:34 8.7 Realignment: the South becomes Republican 00:55:59 8.7.1 1964–1972 00:58:15 8.7.1.1 Southern strategy 01:02:48 9 From Ronald Reagan to the Bush: 1980–2008 01:03:01 9.1 Reagan Revolution 01:06:37 9.2 Congressional ascendancy in 1994 01:09:52 9.3 Neoconservatives 01:11:00 9.4 Second Bush era 01:16:43 10 Challenging the Barack Obama administration: 2009–2016 01:19:39 10.1 2012–2016 01:24:10 11 2016 elections and presidency of Donald Trump 01:28:49 11.1 Demographic shifts since 2009 01:30:06 12 See also 01:30:33 13 Notes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the world's oldest extant political parties. The party values reflect economic conservatism, classical conservatism (modern day American conservatism) and corporate liberty rights. It is the second oldest existing political party in the United States after its primary rival, the Democratic Party. The party emerged in 1854 to combat the Kansas–Nebraska Act, an act that dissolved the terms of the Missouri Compromise and allowed slave or free status to be decided in the territories by popular sovereignty. The early Republican Party had almost no presence in the Southern United States, but by 1858 it had enlisted former Whigs and former Free Soil Democrats to form majorities in nearly every Northern state. With its election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860 and its success in guiding the Union to victory in the American Civil War and abolishing slavery, the party came to dominate the national political scene until 1932. The Republican Party at its beginning consisted of African-American and White Northern Protestants, businessmen, small business owners, professionals, factory workers, and farmers. It was pro-business, supporting banks, the gold standard, railroads and high tariffs to protect factory workers and grow industry faster. Under William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt, it emphasized an expansive foreign policy. The GOP lost its majorities during the Great Depression (1929–1940). Instead, the Democrats under Franklin D. Roosevelt formed a winning New Deal coalition, which was dominant from 1932 through 1964. That coalition collapsed in the mid-1960s, partly because of white Southern Democrats' disaffection with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Republicans won five of the six presidential elections from 1968 to 1988, with Ronald Reagan as the party's iconic conservative hero. From 1992 to 2016, the Republican candidate has been elected to the White House in three of the seven presidential elections. Two of these (the 2000 and 2016 elections) saw George W. Bush and Donald Trump losing the popular vote, but winning the Electoral College. A similar situation in which Republicans won the Electoral College, but lost the popular vote were the 1876 and 1888 elections. The Republican Party expanded its base throughout the South after 1968 (excepting 1976), largely due to its strength among socially conservative white evangelical Protestants and traditionalist Roman Catholics. As white Democrats in th ...
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History of the United States (1865–1918) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of the United States (1865–1918) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The history of the United States from 1865 until 1918 covers the Reconstruction Era, the Gilded Age, and the Progressive Era, and includes the rise of industrialization and the resulting surge of immigration in the United States. This article focuses on political, economic, and diplomatic history. This period of rapid economic growth and soaring prosperity in the North and the West (but not in the South) saw the U.S. become the world's dominant economic, industrial, and agricultural power. The average annual income (after inflation) of non-farm workers grew by 75% from 1865 to 1900, and then grew another 33% by 1918.With a decisive victory in 1865 over Southern secessionists in the Civil War, the United States became a united and powerful nation with a strong national government. Reconstruction brought the end of legalized slavery plus citizenship for the former slaves, but their new-found political power was rolled back within a decade, and they became second-class citizens under a "Jim Crow" system of deeply pervasive segregation that would stand for the next 80–90 years. Politically, during the Third Party System and Fourth Party System the nation was mostly dominated by Republicans (except for two Democratic presidents). After 1900 and the assassination of President William McKinley, the Progressive Era brought political, business, and social reforms (e.g., new roles for and government expansion of education, higher status for women, a curtailment of corporate excesses, and modernization of many areas of government and society). The Progressives worked through new middle-class organizations to fight against the corruption and behind-the-scenes power of entrenched, state political party organizations and big-city "machines". They demanded—and won—women's right to vote, and the nationwide prohibition of alcohol 1920-1933. In an unprecedented wave of European immigration, 27.5 million new arrivals between 1865 and 1918 provided the labor base necessary for the expansion of industry and agriculture, as well as the population base for most of fast-growing urban America. By the late nineteenth century, the United States had become a leading global industrial power, building on new technologies (such as the telegraph and steel), an expanding railroad network, and abundant natural resources such as coal, timber, oil, and farmland, to usher in the Second Industrial Revolution. There were also two very important wars. The U.S. easily defeated Spain in 1898, which unexpectedly brought a small empire. Cuba quickly was given independence, as well as the Philippines (in 1946). Puerto Rico (and some smaller islands) became permanent U.S. possessions, as did Alaska (added by purchase in 1867). The independent Republic of Hawaii voluntarily joined the U.S. as a territory in 1898. The United States tried and failed to broker a peace settlement for World War I, then entered the war after Germany launched a submarine campaign against U.S. merchant ships that were supplying Germany's enemy countries. The publicly stated goals were to uphold American honor, crush German militarism, and reshape the postwar world. After a slow mobilization, the U.S. helped bring about a decisive Allied Forces victory by supplying badly needed financing, food, and millions of fresh and eager soldiers.
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Eritrea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Eritrea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Eritrea (; (listen)), , officially the State of Eritrea is a country in the Horn of Africa, with its capital at Asmara. It is bordered by Sudan in the west, Ethiopia in the south, and Djibouti in the southeast. The northeastern and eastern parts of Eritrea have an extensive coastline along the Red Sea. The nation has a total area of approximately 117,600 km2 (45,406 sq mi), and includes the Dahlak Archipelago and several of the Hanish Islands. Its toponym Eritrea is based on the Greek name for the Red Sea (Ἐρυθρὰ Θάλασσα Erythra Thalassa), which was first adopted for Italian Eritrea in 1890. Eritrea is a multi-ethnic country, with nine recognized ethnic groups in its population of around 5 million. Most residents speak languages from the Afroasiatic family, either of the Ethiopian Semitic languages or Cushitic branches. Among these communities, the Tigrinyas make up about 55% of the population, with the Tigre people constituting around 30% of inhabitants. In addition, there are a number of Nilo-Saharan-speaking Nilotic ethnic minorities. Most people in the territory adhere to Christianity or Islam.The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and northern Ethiopia, was established during the first or second centuries AD. It adopted Christianity around the middle of the fourth century. In medieval times much of Eritrea fell under the Medri Bahri kingdom, with a smaller region being part of Hamasien. The creation of modern-day Eritrea is a result of the incorporation of independent, distinct kingdoms and sultanates (for example, Medri Bahri and the Sultanate of Aussa) eventually resulting in the formation of Italian Eritrea. After the defeat of the Italian colonial army in 1942, Eritrea was administered by the British Military Administration until 1952. Following the UN General Assembly decision, in 1952, Eritrea would govern itself with a local Eritrean parliament but for foreign affairs and defense it would enter into a federal status with Ethiopia for a period of 10 years. However, in 1962 the government of Ethiopia annulled the Eritrean parliament and formally annexed Eritrea. But the Eritreans that argued for complete Eritrean independence since the ouster of the Italians in 1941, anticipated what was coming and in 1960 organized the Eritrean Liberation Front in opposition. In 1991, after 30 years of continuous armed struggle for independence, the Eritrean liberation fighters entered the capital city, Asmara, in victory. Eritrea is a one-party state in which national legislative elections have never been held since independence. According to Human Rights Watch, the Eritrean government's human rights record is among the worst in the world. The Eritrean government has dismissed these allegations as politically motivated. The compulsory military service requires long, indefinite conscription periods, which some Eritreans leave the country to avoid. Because all local media is state-owned, Eritrea was also ranked as having the second-least press freedom in the global Press Freedom Index, behind only North Korea. The sovereign state of Eritrea is a member of the African Union, the United Nations, and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, and is an observer in the Arab League alongside Brazil, Venezuela, India and Turkey.
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British Raj | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: British Raj Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The British Raj (; from rāj, literally, "rule" in Hindustani) was the rule by the British Crown in the Indian subcontinent between 1858 and 1947. The rule is also called Crown rule in India, or direct rule in India. The region under British control was commonly called British India or simply India in contemporaneous usage, and included areas directly administered by the United Kingdom, which were collectively called British India, and those ruled by indigenous rulers, but under British tutelage or paramountcy, and called the princely states. The whole was also informally called the Indian Empire. As India, it was a founding member of the League of Nations, a participating nation in the Summer Olympics in 1900, 1920, 1928, 1932, and 1936, and a founding member of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945.This system of governance was instituted on 28 June 1858, when, after the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the rule of the British East India Company was transferred to the Crown in the person of Queen Victoria (who, in 1876, was proclaimed Empress of India). It lasted until 1947, when it was partitioned into two sovereign dominion states: the Dominion of India (later the Republic of India) and the Dominion of Pakistan (later the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, the eastern part of which, still later, became the People's Republic of Bangladesh). At the inception of the Raj in 1858, Lower Burma was already a part of British India; Upper Burma was added in 1886, and the resulting union, Burma, was administered as an autonomous province until 1937, when it became a separate British colony, gaining its own independence in 1948.
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Austria-Hungary | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austria-Hungary 00:03:43 1 Structure and name 00:09:22 1.1 Creation 00:14:26 2 Government 00:19:19 2.1 Judicial system 00:19:28 2.1.1 Empire of Austria 00:19:37 2.1.2 Kingdom of Hungary 00:21:11 2.2 Public administration and local governments 00:21:22 2.2.1 Empire of Austria 00:26:47 2.2.2 Kingdom of Hungary 00:26:56 2.2.2.1 Administrative divisions and the counties of Hungary 00:30:02 2.2.2.2 Municipal rights of the biggest cities in Hungary 00:31:59 3 Politics 00:32:51 3.1 Political struggles in the Empire 00:36:16 3.2 Ethnic relations 00:45:33 3.2.1 Jews 00:47:43 3.3 Foreign policy 00:50:09 4 Economy 00:55:33 4.1 Automotive industry 00:56:39 4.2 Aeronautic industry 00:58:10 4.3 Locomotive engine and railway vehicle manufacturers 00:59:08 4.4 Poverty 00:59:31 5 Infrastructure 00:59:41 5.1 Transport 00:59:50 5.1.1 Railways 01:00:58 5.1.1.1 Railway network of the Austrian Empire 01:04:38 5.1.1.2 Railway network in the Kingdom of Hungary 01:05:59 5.1.2 Metropolitan transit systems 01:06:08 5.1.2.1 Tramway lines in the cities 01:09:07 5.1.2.2 Electrified commuter railway lines 01:09:34 5.1.2.3 Underground 01:10:17 5.1.3 Canals and river regulations 01:10:45 5.1.3.1 Regulation of the lower Danube and the Iron Gates 01:11:48 5.1.3.2 Regulation of the Tisza River 01:13:26 5.1.4 Shipping and ports 01:16:45 5.2 Telecommunication 01:16:54 5.2.1 Telegraph 01:17:49 5.2.1.1 Austrian Empire 01:17:58 5.2.1.2 Kingdom of Hungary 01:18:28 5.2.2 Telephone 01:19:34 5.2.2.1 Austrian Empire 01:19:55 5.2.2.2 Kingdom of Hungary 01:20:21 5.2.3 Electronic broadcasting 01:20:57 6 Demographics 01:21:15 6.1 Population and area 01:21:24 6.2 Languages 01:22:47 6.3 Religion 01:23:02 6.4 Largest cities 01:23:15 6.5 Education 01:23:24 6.5.1 Austrian Empire 01:28:49 6.5.2 Kingdom of Hungary 01:35:15 7 Military 01:37:56 8 World War I 01:38:05 8.1 Preludes: Bosnia and Herzegovina 01:42:40 8.1.1 Status of Bosnia-Herzegovina 01:45:59 8.1.2 Sarajevo assassination 01:47:32 8.1.3 Escalation of violence in Bosnia 01:48:55 8.1.4 Decision for war 01:55:54 8.2 Wartime foreign policy 01:57:52 8.3 Homefront 02:00:24 8.4 Military events 02:02:15 8.4.1 Serbian front 1914–1916 02:03:55 8.4.2 Russian front 1914–1917 02:05:56 8.4.3 Italian front 1915–1918 02:10:04 8.4.4 Romanian front 1916 02:11:29 8.5 Role of Hungary 02:12:48 8.6 Analysis of defeat 02:16:36 9 Dissolution 02:22:58 9.1 Consequences 02:28:57 9.1.1 Successor states 02:30:42 9.1.2 Territorial legacy 02:34:37 10 Flags and heraldry 02:34:47 10.1 Flags 02:36:51 10.2 Coat of arms 02:37:28 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7287699169656773 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire (the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary (Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it self-dissolved at the end of World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867. Austria-Hungary consisted of two monarchies (Austria and Hungary), and one autonomous region: the Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia under the Hungarian crown, which negotiated the Croatian–Hungarian Settlement (Nagodba) in 1868. It was ruled by the House of Habsburg, and constituted the last phase in the constitutional evolution of the Habsburg Monarchy. Following the 1867 reforms, the Austrian and the Hungarian states were co-equal. Foreign affairs and the military came under joint oversight, but all other governmental faculties were divided between respective states. Austria-Hungary was a multinational state and one of the Europe's major powers at the time. Austria-Hung ...
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List of federal political scandals in the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: List of federal political scandals in the United States 00:00:10 1 Scope and organization of political scandals 00:02:50 2 Federal government scandals 00:03:00 2.1 Donald Trump administration (2017–present) 00:03:11 2.1.1 Executive Branch 00:08:36 2.1.2 Legislative Branch 00:11:53 2.1.3 Judicial Branch 00:12:12 2.2 Barack Obama administration (2009–2017) 00:12:24 2.2.1 Executive Branch 00:15:59 2.2.2 Legislative Branch 00:25:36 2.2.3 Judicial Branch 00:27:12 2.3 George W. Bush administration (2001–2009) 00:27:21 2.3.1 Executive Branch 00:45:15 2.3.2 Legislative Branch 00:52:39 2.4 Bill Clinton administration (1993–2001) 00:52:51 2.4.1 Executive Branch 00:54:44 2.4.2 Legislative Branch 00:59:56 2.5 George H. W. Bush administration (1989–1993) 01:00:05 2.5.1 Executive Branch 01:01:44 2.5.2 Legislative Branch 01:02:40 2.5.3 Judicial Branch 01:03:06 2.6 Ronald Reagan administration (1981–1989) 01:03:19 2.6.1 Executive Branch 01:15:06 2.6.2 Legislative Branch 01:19:52 2.6.3 Judicial Branch 01:20:21 2.7 James E. Carter administration (1977–1981) 01:20:30 2.7.1 Executive Branch 01:20:47 2.7.2 Legislative branch 01:23:29 2.7.3 Judicial 01:24:07 2.8 Gerald Ford administration (1974–1977) 01:24:20 2.8.1 Executive Branch 01:24:52 2.8.2 Legislative Branch 01:26:53 2.9 Richard M. Nixon administration (1969–1974) 01:27:02 2.9.1 Executive Branch 01:31:48 2.9.2 Legislative Branch 01:34:06 2.9.3 Judicial Branch 01:35:11 2.10 Lyndon B. Johnson administration (1963–1969) 01:35:20 2.10.1 Executive Branch 01:35:41 2.10.2 Legislative Branch 01:36:54 2.10.3 Judicial Branch 01:37:14 2.11 John F. Kennedy administration (1961–1963) 01:37:23 2.11.1 Legislative Branch 01:38:05 2.12 Dwight D. Eisenhower administration (1953–1961) 01:38:14 2.12.1 Executive Branch 01:39:09 2.12.2 Legislative Branch 01:40:29 2.13 Harry S. Truman administration (1945–1953) 01:40:38 2.13.1 Executive Branch 01:41:11 2.13.2 Legislative Branch 01:42:20 2.14 Franklin Delano Roosevelt administration (1933–1945) 01:42:34 2.14.1 Executive Branch 01:42:53 2.14.2 Legislative Branch 01:43:29 2.14.3 Judicial Branch 01:44:22 2.15 Herbert Hoover administration (1929–1933) 01:44:34 2.15.1 Legislative Branch 01:45:13 2.16 Calvin Coolidge administration (1923–1929) 01:45:25 2.16.1 Executive 01:45:57 2.16.2 Legislative 01:46:48 2.16.3 Judicial 01:47:08 2.17 Warren G. Harding administration (1921–1923) 01:47:16 2.17.1 Executive Branch 01:48:51 2.17.2 Legislative Branch 01:49:42 2.18 Woodrow Wilson administration (1913–1921) 01:49:55 2.18.1 Executive Branch 01:50:24 2.19 William Howard Taft administration (1909–1913) 01:50:37 2.19.1 Legislative Branch 01:51:13 2.19.2 Judicial Branch 01:51:43 2.20 Theodore Roosevelt administration (1901–1909) 01:51:56 2.20.1 Legislative Branch 01:52:40 2.20.2 Judicial Branch 01:53:01 2.21 William McKinley administration (1897–1901) 01:53:14 2.21.1 Executive Branch 01:53:55 2.21.2 Legislative Branch 01:54:35 2.22 Grover Cleveland administration (1885–1889) 01:54:47 2.22.1 Legislative Branch 01:55:09 2.23 Chester A. Arthur administration (1881–1885) 01:55:18 2.23.1 Executive Branch 01:55:49 2.24 James A. Garfield administration (1881–1881) 01:55:58 2.24.1 Legislative Branch 01:56:21 2.25 Rutherford B. Hayes administration (1877–1881) 01:56:30 2.25.1 Executive Branch 01:56:50 2.25.2 Judicial Branch 01:57:28 2.26 Ulysses S. Grant administration (1869–1877) 01:57:37 2.26.1 Executive Branch 01:59:45 2.26.2 Legislative Branch 02:00:53 2.26.3 Judicial Branch 02:01:54 2.27 Andrew Johnson administration (1865–1869) 02:02:07 2.27.1 Executive branch 02:02:25 2.28 Abraham Lincoln administration (1861–1865) 02:02:38 2.28.1 Executive Branch 02:03:15 2.28.2 Legislative Branch 02:04:05 2.29 James Buchanan administration (1857–1861) 02:04:18 2.29.1 Legislative Branch 02:05:01 2.30 Zachary Taylor administration (1849–1850) 02:05:13 2.30.1 Executive Branch 02:05:44 2.31 Andrew Jackson administrations (1829–1836) 02:05:57 2.31.1 Executive Branch 02:06:41 2.31.2 Legislative Branch 02:07:07 2.32 James Monroe administrations (1817–1824) 02:07:20 2.32.1 Legislative Branch 02:07:36 2.33 Thomas Jefferson administrations (1801–1808) 02:07:48 2.33.1 Executive Branch 02:08:36 2.33.2 Judicial Branch 02:09:08 2.34 John Adams administration (1797–1800) 02:09:20 2.34.1 Executive Branch 02:09:49 2.34.2 Legislative Branch 02:10:18 2.35 George Washington administration (1789–1796) 02:10:30 2.35.1 Legislative Branch 02:10:49 2.36 Government under the Articles of Confederation (1777–1788) 02:11:03 2.36.1 Executive Branch 02:11:24 2.36.2 Legislative Branch 02:11:47 3 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening s ...
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Chester A. Arthur | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:00:10
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Chester A. Arthur Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American attorney and politician who served as the 21st President of the United States from 1881 to 1885; he was the 20th Vice President of the United States and became president upon the death of President James Garfield in September 1881. Arthur was born in Fairfield, Vermont, grew up in upstate New York, and practiced law in New York City. He served as quartermaster general of the New York Militia during the American Civil War. Following the war, he devoted more time to Republican politics and quickly rose in New York Senator Roscoe Conkling's political machine. Appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant to the lucrative and politically powerful post of Collector of the Port of New York in 1871, Arthur was an important supporter of Conkling and the Stalwart faction of the Republican Party. In 1878, the new president, Rutherford B. Hayes, fired Arthur as part of a plan to reform the federal patronage system in New York. When Garfield won the Republican nomination for president in 1880, Arthur, an eastern Stalwart, was nominated for vice president to balance the ticket. Six months into his term Arthur assumed the presidency upon the assassination of his predecessor by a mentally ill Stalwart. At the outset, Arthur struggled to overcome a negative reputation as a Stalwart and product of Conkling's machine. To the surprise of reformers, he took up the cause of civil service reform. Arthur advocated for and enforced the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act. He presided over the rebirth of the United States Navy, but was criticized for failing to alleviate the federal budget surplus, which had been accumulating since the end of the Civil War. Arthur signed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which resulted in denying citizenship to Chinese Americans until 1898 and barring Chinese immigration until 1943. Building on the 1875 Page Act, which barred Chinese women from entering the country, it was the first total ban on an ethnic or national group from immigrating to the country. Suffering from poor health, Arthur made only a limited effort to secure the Republican Party's nomination in 1884; he retired at the close of his term. Journalist Alexander McClure later wrote, "No man ever entered the Presidency so profoundly and widely distrusted as Chester Alan Arthur, and no one ever retired ... more generally respected, alike by political friend and foe." Although his failing health and political temperament combined to make his administration less active than a modern presidency, he earned praise among contemporaries for his solid performance in office. The New York World summed up Arthur's presidency at his death in 1886: "No duty was neglected in his administration, and no adventurous project alarmed the nation." Mark Twain wrote of him, "[I]t would be hard indeed to better President Arthur's administration." Over the 20th and 21st centuries, however, Arthur's reputation mostly faded among the public. He is generally ranked as an average president by historians and scholars. Arthur's obscurity has caused some historians and journalists to describe him as "the Most Forgotten U.S. President".
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Labor spying in the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_spying_in_the_United_States 00:02:19 1 Who are they? 00:06:06 2 Labor spy techniques 00:08:14 2.1 Intelligence 00:09:41 2.2 Missionary work 00:11:09 2.3 Provocations 00:13:36 2.4 Operatives in high places 00:14:31 3 A historical overview 00:20:26 3.1 Investigations 00:24:35 4 Case histories and analysis 00:24:45 4.1 Pinkerton agent in the anthracite mines 00:25:38 4.2 Siringo at Coeur d'Alene 00:30:39 4.3 Colorado's Goldmine and Mill Strike of 1903–04 00:37:13 4.3.1 Intrigue and uncertainty during the Colorado Labor Wars 00:39:51 4.3.2 Spy vs. spy in Boston's public transit system 00:41:01 4.3.3 Matewan 00:43:54 4.3.4 The Colorado Coal Strike of 1927 00:49:48 4.3.4.1 Celebrated union organizers are not immune 00:50:47 4.3.5 The United Mine Workers in Wyoming 00:51:45 4.3.6 The United Mine Workers in Colorado 00:55:12 4.4 Union organizers turn tables on the company 00:58:17 4.4.1 United States Chamber of Commerce plan thwarted 00:58:59 5 Corporations that spy 00:59:09 5.1 Wal-Mart surveillance of employees 01:02:06 6 Agencies 01:03:12 6.1 Examples 01:03:42 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8407358263990377 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Labor spying in the United States has involved people recruited or employed for the purpose of gathering intelligence, committing sabotage, sowing dissent, or engaging in other similar activities, in the context of an employer/labor organization relationship. Spying by companies on union activities has been illegal in the United States since the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. According to the American Management Association, nearly 80% of major US companies actively spy on their employees.Statistics suggest that, historically, trade unions have been frequent targets of labor spying. Labor spying is most typically used by companies or their agents, and such activity often complements union busting. In at least one case, an employer hired labor spies to spy not only upon strikers, but also upon strikebreakers that he had hired.Sidney Howard observed in 1921 that the labor spy, "often unknown to the very employer who retains him through his agency, is in a position of immense strength. There is no power to hold him to truth-telling." Because the labor spy operates in secret, "all [co-workers] are suspected, and intense bitterness is aroused against employers, the innocent and the guilty alike."Historically, one of the most incriminating indictments of the labor spy business may have been the testimony of Albert Balanow (some sources list the name as Ballin or Blanow) during an investigation of the detective agencies' roles during the Red Scare. Albert Balanow had worked with both the Burns Detective Agency and the Thiel Detective Agency. Balanow testified that the Red Scare was all about shaking down businessmen for protection money. "If there is no conspiracy, you've got to make a conspiracy in order to hold your job."The sudden exposure of labor spies has driven workers "to violence and unreason", including at least one shooting war.
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