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Lewis Hine against child labour
 
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Lewis Hine is most famous for his photographs of the construction workers who helped build the Empire State Building in 1930. But in the years before he celebrated the heroic labour of these men working high above Manhattan, Hine used his photographs to campaign for social reform. In 1908 the then-sociology professor was hired by the National Child Labor Committee to document how children as young as seven were working in cotton mills and coal mines. Over a decade he took thousands of photographs that helped convince US lawmakers to introduce new industrial regulations to protect children.
Views: 8105 Lloyd Share
Depressing Vintage Photos of Child Labor In USA 1908- 1912
 
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After the Civil War, the availability of natural resources, new inventions, and a receptive market combined to fuel an industrial boom. The demand for labor grew, and in the late 19th and early 20th centuries many children were drawn into the labor force. Factory wages were so low that children often had to work to help support their families. The number of children under the age of 15 who worked in industrial jobs for wages climbed from 1.5 million in 1890 to 2 million in 1910. Businesses liked to hire children because they worked in unskilled jobs for lower wages than adults, and their small hands made them more adept at handling small parts and tools. Children were seen as part of the family economy. Immigrants and rural migrants often sent their children to work, or worked alongside them. However, child laborers barely experienced their youth. Going to school to prepare for a better future was an opportunity these underage workers rarely enjoyed. As children worked in industrial settings, they began to develop serious health problems. Many child laborers were underweight. Some suffered from stunted growth and curvature of the spine. They developed diseases related to their work environment, such as tuberculosis and bronchitis for those who worked in coal mines or cotton mills. They faced high accident rates due to physical and mental fatigue caused by hard work and long hours. Lewis Hine (September 26, 1874 – November 3, 1940) was an American sociologist and photographer. Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States. In 1908, he became the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC), leaving his teaching position. Over the next decade, Hine documented child labor, with focus on labor in the Carolina Piedmont, in American industry to aid the NCLC’s lobbying efforts to end the practice. By 1916, Congress passed the Keating-Owens Act that established the following child labor standards: a minimum age of 14 for workers in manufacturing and 16 for workers in mining; a maximum workday of 8 hours; prohibition of night work for workers under age 16; and a documentary proof of age. By 1920 the number of child laborers was cut to nearly half of what it had been in 1910. “There is work that profits children, and there is work that brings profit only to employers. The object of employing children is not to train them, but to get high profits from their work”. – Lewis Hine, 1908. *********************************************************************** -Music: Air Prelude by: Kevin MacLeod -Music Download Link: https://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100337
Views: 6753 Luth Luther
Elegant Machinery, Do You Know
 
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Elegant Machinery - Do You Know -By the early 1900s many Americans were calling child labour "child slavery" and were demanding an end to it. They argued that long hours of work deprived children of the opportunity of an education to prepare themselves for a better future. Instead, child labour condemned them to a future of illiteracy, poverty, and continuing misery. In 1904 a group of progressive reformers founded the National Child Labor Committee, an organization whose goal was the abolition of child labor. The organization received a charter from Congress in 1907. It hired teams of investigators to gather evidence of children working in harsh conditions and then organized exhibitions with photographs and statistics to dramatize the plight of these children. Lewis Hine, a New York City schoolteacher and photographer, believed that a picture could tell a powerful story. He felt so strongly about the abuse of children as workers that he quit his teaching job and became an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee. Hine traveled around the country photographing the working conditions of children in all types of industries. He photographed children in coal mines, in meatpacking houses, in textile mills, and in canneries. He took pictures of children working in the streets as shoe shiners, newsboys, and hawkers. In many instances he tricked his way into factories to take the pictures that factory managers did not want the public to see. Lewis Hine died in poverty, neglected by all but a few. His reputation continued to grow, however, and now he is recognized as a master American photographer. His photographs remind us what it was like to be a child and to labor like an adult at a time when labor was harsher than it is now. Hine's images of working children stirred America's conscience and helped changed the nation's labour laws.
Views: 6352 CarminaBarritus
Colourized 100+ Year Old Photos Of American Child Labour
 
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Lewis Wickes Hine was an American sociologist and photographer, whose work was instrumental in changing child labour laws in the United States. His record of the first half of the 20th century is a unique glimpse into the real lives of working-class America, and his work for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC) was instrumental in bringing about change for the nation’s children. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQzpk-WPUHM Source of photos in the video: All original images © Lewis Wickes Hine courtesy of the US Library of Congress. Colourised images © Tom Marshall (PhotograFix) 2018. https://www.photogra-fix.com/ https://www.boredpanda.com/colourised-old-photos-american-child-labour-tom-marshall/ Hello Dear friend! Youth Gene - is the channel where you can find interesting facts from history you probably didn’t learn before. We collect the most rare historic photos because each historical photograph has a story to tell, each of them documents a major event in human history. And we know that history repeats itself. Subscribe to YOUTH GENE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi7m7_Bcq9ZBpVcYZUXRl5A?sub_confirmation=1 "Mystery Bazaar" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 3162 YOUTH GENE
Sound Smart: Child Labor in the Industrial Revolution | History
 
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Historian Yohuru Williams gives a rundown of important facts on child labor in the time of the Industrial Revolution. #SoundSmart Subscribe for more from HISTORY on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=historychannel Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Episode 1 Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays, get the best of HISTORY with exclusive videos on our most popular topics. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Views: 62102 HISTORY
Anthracite Fields wins 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Music
 
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Julia Wolfe's Anthracite Fields, an oratorio for chorus and instruments, has been awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Music. Wolfe drew on oral histories, interviews, speeches, geographic descriptions, children’s rhymes, and coal advertisements to create a work that gives an intimate look at a particular slice of American life. Cited by the Pulitzer committee as "a powerful oratorio for chorus and sextet evoking Pennsylvania coal-mining life around the turn of the 20th Century," the work premiered at the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia last April followed by a performance at the NY PHIL BIENNIAL in May. It was met with rave reviews. The New York Times wrote, “In Ms. Wolfe’s polished and stylistically assured cantata, the overall coherence of the musical material helped her expressions of outrage to burn cleanly and brightly.” The Philadelphia Inquirer praised the piece for creating “an alternate universe.” Anthracite Fields will be released on Cantaloupe Music this September, in a recording that features the Bang on a Can All-Stars and The Choir of Trinity Wall Street with Julian Wachner conducting. The next performance will be in March 2016 with the Los Angeles Master Chorale. "My aim with Anthracite Fields is to honor the people who persevered and endured in the Pennsylvania Anthracite coal region during a time when the industry fueled the nation, and to reveal a bit about who we are as American workers." Named after the technical term for the purest form of coal, anthracite, Anthracite Fields was written after Wolfe did extensive research about the coal mining industry in an area very near where she grew up in Pennsylvania. She writes, "In some ways the piece is a return to my small town Pennsylvania roots. In looking north – the left turn onto route 309, the road-rarely-taken – I delved into a local history.” Anthracite Fields is written in five movements: Foundation: The singers chant the names of miners that appeared on a Pennsylvania Mining Accident index 1869-1916. At the center of Foundation is text from geological descriptions of coal formation. Breaker Boys: In the center of this movement are the words of Anthony (Shorty) Slick, who worked as a breaker boy. The interview is taken from the documentary film America and Lewis Hine, directed by Nina Rosenblum. Hine worked for the National Child Labor Committee and served as chief photographer for the WPA. Speech: The text is adapted from an excerpt of a speech by John L. Lewis, who served as president of the United Mine Workers of America. Flowers: Flowers was inspired by an interview with Barbara Powell, daughter and granddaughter of miners. In one interview Barbara said, “We all had gardens,” and then she began to list the names of flowers. Appliances: Even today coal is fueling the nation, powering electricity. The closing words of Anthracite Fields are taken from an advertising campaign for the coal-powered railroad. In 1900 Ernest Elmo Calkins created a fictitious character, a New York socialite named Phoebe Snow, who rode the rails to Buffalo. It used to be a dirty business to ride a train. But with the diamond of coal her “gown stayed white from morn till night, on the road to Anthracite.” Anthracite Fields was commissioned through Meet the Composer’s Commissioning Music/USA program, which is made possible by generous support from the Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Helen F. Whitaker Fund. Additional support was made possible through the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia Alan Harler New Ventures Fund; The Presser Foundation; The Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; the National Endowment for the Arts; The Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia, and the Aaron Copland Fund for Music.
Views: 4494 RedPoppyMusic
Child Labor in NYC in the 1900's
 
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It's 1907 in New York, NY. I'm Dominique Parker, a member of the National Child Labor Committee. I will be interviewed by Alexis Amaguana, a reporter from News 4, about Child Labor laws. Younji Park is the producer for News channel 4.
Views: 666 L Fontaine
Cotton Mill Girl: Behind Lewis Hine's Photograph & Child Labor Series | 100 Photos | TIME
 
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Lewis Hine’s photograph of a girl at work in a cotton mill, part of his monumental series on child labor, forced Americans to reckon with their economic exploitation of youth. Subscribe to TIME ►► http://po.st/SubscribeTIME In this unprecedented exploration of 100 photographs that shaped the human experience, TIME goes behind each spectacular image to reveal how and why it changed the course of history. Order the book now at the TIME Shop. http://po.st/TIME100Photos Visit the complete multimedia experience at http://100photos.time.com/ Get closer to the world of entertainment and celebrity news as TIME gives you access and insight on the people who make what you watch, read and share. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2EFFA5DB900C633F Money helps you learn how to spend and invest your money. Find advice and guidance you can count on from how to negotiate, how to save and everything in between. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNKdqS_Wccs94rMHiajrRr4W Find out more about the latest developments in science and technology as TIME’s access brings you to the ideas and people changing our world. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNIzsgcwqhT6ctKOfHfyuaL3 Let TIME show you everything you need to know about drones, autonomous cars, smart devices and the latest inventions which are shaping industries and our way of living https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862F811BE8F5623 Stay up to date on breaking news from around the world through TIME’s trusted reporting, insight and access https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNJeIsW3A2d5Bs22Wc3PHma6 CONNECT WITH TIME Web: http://time.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TIME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/time Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TIME/videos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/time/?hl=en Magazine: http://time.com/magazine/ Newsletter: time.com/newsletter ABOUT TIME TIME brings unparalleled insight, access and authority to the news. A 24/7 news publication with nearly a century of experience, TIME’s coverage shapes how we understand our world. Subscribe for daily news, interviews, science, technology, politics, health, entertainment, and business updates, as well as exclusive videos from TIME’s Person of the Year, TIME 100 and more created by TIME’s acclaimed writers, producers and editors. Cotton Mill Girl: Behind Lewis Hine's Photograph & Child Labor Series | 100 Photos | TIME https://www.youtube.com/user/TimeMagazine
Views: 101539 TIME
School children skip class to mine gold in Namayingo
 
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Police in Namayingo district have started cracking down on child labor, and especially children involved in the business of gold-mining. Subscribe to Our Channel For more news visit http://www.ntv.co.ug Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/ntvuganda Like our Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/NTVUganda
Views: 827 NTVUganda
Australian Strike (1949)
 
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Thought to be Selected Originals from late 1940s material. Cessnock, New South Wales, Australia. Communist leaders are arrested for causing miner's strike, which cripples Aussie trade. Australian voiceovered newsreel material. LV Idle coal mine. Angle shot idle pit-head wheel. SV Miners walking out of cage. LV Miners idling about on street corner. LV Workers leaving factory. SV Workers leaving factory. GV Power station. SV Interior controls of power station. SV Idle dynamos etc. SV Man and woman boiling kettle on improvised fire. SV Woman putting tea into can and heating can with blow lamp. SV Woman cooking on improvised fire with bricks. LV Idle tram cars in depot. Angle shot Australian Communist Party Central Committee Headquarters building pan down crowd and police outside. SV Police outside entrance. SV Police in plain clothes loading up lorry with crates and bundles of Communist papers. SV Police throwing bundles of papers onto lorry. SV Plain clothes police putting large crate onto lorry. Pan SV Communist President Idris Williams talking to man in street. SV Two judges entering building. LV Wharf labourers demonstrating outside court house. SV Police controlling men. Top view men assembled outside entrance to court. SV Top view police controlling men. SV Interior police arresting Communist Pres. Idris Williams. CU Mr Justice Foster, SV Pan Communist agitators with clenched fists outside courthouse. SV Police leading out General Secretary of the Miners Federation G W S Grant. SV Pan police leading out Communist President Idris Williams into black maria. SV Handful of Communist agitators with clenched fists. Possibly connected with 49/59 - MD. Film shows signs of the start of decomposition. FILM ID:1532.24 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 398 British Pathé
From Coal Miners to Teachers: West Virginia Continues to Lead Radical Labor Struggle in the U.S.
 
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https://democracynow.org - For decades, West Virginia has been at the forefront of labor activism in the United States. As the state’s teachers continue their historic strike, which has shut down every single West Virginia school, we look at the history of the labor activism in the Mountain State. We speak with Jay O’Neal, a middle school teacher and a union activist in Charleston, West Virginia. And we speak with Mike Elk, senior labor reporter at Payday Report. His most recent piece is titled “West Virginia Teachers’ Strike Fever Starting to Spread to Other States.” Democracy Now! is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on nearly 1,400 TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9AM ET: https://democracynow.org Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today: https://democracynow.org/donate FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: http://facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: https://twitter.com/democracynow YouTube: http://youtube.com/democracynow SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/democracynow Daily Email: https://democracynow.org/subscribe Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DemocracyNow Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow Tumblr: http://democracynow.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/democracynow iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/democracy-now!-audio/id73802554 TuneIn: http://tunein.com/radio/Democracy-Now-p90/ Stitcher Radio: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/democracy-now
Views: 4079 Democracy Now!
Profits From The Death Of Coal Mine Workers
 
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Cenk took the facts in here from many articles, but the primary one he mentioned is a great 2006 article from the Lexington Herald Leader. You can read that here: http://www.kentucky.com/2006/10/20/11062/two-for-the-money.html New Prizes For TYT Raffle (4/12): http://tinyurl.com/yc9gr68 Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/theyoungturks TYT Network (new WTF?! channel): http://www.youtube.com/user/whattheflickshow TYT on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=4304483100 Check Out TYT Interviews http://www.youtube.com/user/TYTInterviews Watch more at http://www.theyoungturks.com
Views: 24687 The Young Turks
Introduction to Labour History
 
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This series of five short videos (stitched together here for continuous watching) serve as introductions to the topics in AUPE's Introduction to Labour History course. The five topics are: The Origins of Unions; Industrial Unions; Public Sector Unions; Widening the Circle (Marginalized Workers and Unions); and Preserving and Sharing Our Stories.
Views: 9421 AlbertaUnion
The dark history of conscription and forced labor behind Japan's Hashima Island,
 
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하시마섬 유네스코 세계유산 등재 2년... 그 후? Hashima island. One of dozens of controversial sites Japan has pushed to gain UNESCO World Heritage recognition. A proud symbol of Japan's rapid industrialization. Contrary to the image Tokyo is promoting it's where hundreds of Koreans were taken and forced into labor in deadly undersea coal mines. Oh Jung-hee met with the few survivors to hear their stories. A 15-second-long video has been lighting up New York's Times Square since Monday. It aims to shed light on a less well-known aspect of Hashima Island -- one of Japan's UNESCO World Heritage sites. "It's a fact that the island is listed as a world heritage site. So our ad starts with this fact, and then delves deeper into forced conscription and the 120 victims. It ends by saying that Hashima's true name is 'island of hell.'" Roughly 15 kilometers away from the city of Nagasaki in southwestern Japan... lies the uninhabited island of Hashima. Surrounded by a sea wall, and full of abandoned concrete buildings,... the island resembles a battleship, which is why it's commonly called Gunkanjima or "Battleship Island." The island is recognized as a symbol of Japan's rapid industrialization,... but has a dark history of conscription and forced labor. From 1940 to 1945, five hundred to eight hundred Koreans were forcibly taken to Hashima Island. Kim Hyung-seob is one of them. The exact date that he was taken to Japan -- November 17th, 1943 -- is one he can never forget. "I don't even want to talk about it. I can't explain how much we suffered. Eating was the biggest problem. They gave us dried sweet potato, beans and bean dregs. That's what they called 'food' for us." Korean laborers were neither well-fed nor well-paid.. And they had to spend more than 12 hours a day in the coal mine,... which is 1-thousand meters under the sea. Lee In-un is another survivor. He says... some laborers desperately tried to escape from 'hell'... but failed. "The land was visible from the island. It was right across the sea. Some tried to escape by swimming and holding onto wooden panels. But they died." "The dreary atmosphere of Hashima island can be seen through these photos here. And what's clearly noticeable is the difference in living environments between Japanese citizens and Korean laborers. The Japanese citizens living in modern, newly built apartments. In contrast, five hundred to eight hundred Korean laborers were crammed into these small buildings." Hashima Island was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015,... as one of the places symbolizing Japan's Meiji Industrial Revolution. When Japan got the endorsement of the UNESCO advisory committee ICOMOS, Korea strongly protested against it,... claiming that having these places as world heritage sites hurts the victims' and UNESCO's dignity. At the 2015 UNESCO official meeting, Japan, for the first time on the international stage,... acknowledged there was forced labor. "There were a large number of Koreans and others who were brought against their will and forced to work under harsh conditions in the 1940s at some of the sites." But that was immediately reversed by the Japanese foreign minister Fumio Kishida. "The expression 'forced to work' does not mean 'forced labor.'" ICOMOS recommended that Japan take measures to help visitors understand the 'full history' of the sites... and Japan promised to establish information and commemoration centers. While an implementation report on that is due December 1st this year,... not much action has been taken within Japan. "According to what we're hearing from civil groups in Japan,... signboards installed at the facilities don't explain at all about conscription and forced labor. Rather, the authorities are interviewing the Japanese people who lived on the island back then... who say Hashima was not an 'island of hell' like what Koreans say." The Korean government is to raise the issue at the annual UNESCO World Heritage Committee meeting... currently taking place in Poland. The government expressed regret that no tangible measures have been taken in Japan over the last two years... and highlighted Japan's promise is not only an agreement with Korea, but with the whole world. Having an agreed view on history and remembering it is crucial in heading toward the future. For Korea, the first step would be recognizing Hashima Island and others as legacies of Japan's industrialization... and for Japan, to face the fact that colonization contributed to its industrialization. Oh Jung-hee, Arirang News. Visit ‘Arirang News’ Official Pages Facebook(NEWS): http://www.facebook.com/newsarirang Homepage: http://www.arirang.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld
Views: 29492 ARIRANG NEWS
Can Photography End Child Labor?
 
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Subscribe! http://skr.cm/SubscribeToStories Watch more episodes! http://bit.ly/1SiejNW In 1916, photographer Lewis Wickes Hine helped put a stop to child labor in America by documenting young children in the workforce. See how photographers today are trying to do the same in Bangladesh and beyond. This weekly storytelling series uses the imagery of photographers and adventurers around the world to give us a deeper connection to and understanding of the human condition. Watch Seeker's content days before anyone else, click here for a free 30 day subscription to Vessel: http://skr.cm/seekeratvessel Join the Seeker community! Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeekerNetwork Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seeker-Network/872690716088418?ref=hl Instagram: http://instagram.com/seekernetwork Tumblr: http://seekernetwork.tumblr.com Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/100537624873180533713/about iOS app: http://seekernetwork.com/ios
Views: 59396 Stories
960. Come All You Coal Miners (Sarah Ogan Gunning)
 
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Sarah Garland Gunning (later Sarah Ogan Gunning) was the tenth of 11 children in a Kentucky mining family, at a time when miners were paid less than a dollar and a half for a ten-hour day and worked in appalling conditions. Her father, Jim Garland, was blacklisted as he represented the miners in their fight for better wages, forcing him to use aliases in order go work in the mines. In 1931, a group of Northerners called the Dreiser Committee came to Kentucky to investigate atrocities committed against the miners, and brought their plight to national attention. Sarah Garland and her sister, Molly (later known as Aunt Molly Jackson) wrote and sang songs in support of the struggle at labor rallies. They were taken to New York by members of the Dreiser Committee to help raise money for the miners' cause. Sarah, who was suffering from brown lung disease met folk singers like Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger and Lee Hays, who went on to record her songs. After successful treatment for tuberculosis treatment she retired from performing, but returned in the '60s to perform at several major folk festivals. Her half brother, Jim Garland, wrote "I Don't Want Your Millions, Mister", which I have already uploaded to YouTube. This song, written in 1937, is typical of her work. It has been recorded by Uncle Tupelo, who sings it from the perspective of a coal miner, rather than a coal miner's wife as in the original version, and also by Mike Seeger. Lyrics of this song can be found here: http://www.raymondfolk.com/page/Come+All+You+Coal+Miners+%28Sarah+Ogan+Gunning%29 To see a playlist of all my a capella songs go to: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E81659B9EA983BB2 You can see a playlist of my mining songs here: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=CF909DA14CE415DF For lyrics and chords of all my songs, please see my website: http://raymondfolk.wikifoundry.com
Views: 2668 raymondcrooke
Shame on Global Coal Management! Hands Off Bangladesh!
 
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Press release from the UK branch of the Committee to Protect Oil Gas-Mineral Resources and Port-Power in Bangladesh, in conjunction with Phulbari Solidarity Group, "Today we, the activists from Bangladesh, Tower Hamlets, and London’s environmental organisations, have gathered to call upon the AIM-listed London-based multinational company, GCM Resources Plc, to end its unethical business. The company, GCM Resources, is desperately moving to implement an immense open pit coal mine in northwest Bangladesh, forcibly displacing an estimated 130, 000 people and destroying the homes, lands, and water sources of as many as 220,000 people. If the project is implemented, it will destroy over 14,660 acres of fertile agricultural land that produce three food crops annually, threatening to increase hunger in a country in which over a third of all children and nearly 17 percent of the entire population are undernourished. "GCM’s planned Phulbari coal mine has provoked repeated protests by local people. Three people were killed and over 200 injured when paramilitary officers opened fire on a protest against the project in August 2006. Protests in 2013 forced the company’s CEO, Gary Lye, to abandon a visit to the area. "The project has generated grave concern at national and international levels including the United Nations. On 28 February, 2012, seven UN human rights experts have called for an immediate halt to the project, citing threats to fundamental human rights, including the rights to water, food, adequate housing, freedom from extreme poverty and the rights of indigenous peoples. But GCM is aggressively moving ahead to implement this project. They are selling fraudulent shares in London’s Alternative Investors Market (AIM) without any valid contract with Bangladesh Government. "The situation in Phulbari has become tense and volatile again since Tuesday the 25th November, when the company’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Gary N Lye, attempted to visit Phulbari. Gary Lye is the man who called the protesters outsiders in 2006, and commented, after the death of three people shot by police at a demonstration, that "I am a businessman, [ ...] I will continue my business in Phulbari’ regardless of whether there was a bloodshed or not. Therefore, people in Phulbari braved cold to raise their protest at Gary Lye’s attempted visit. Over a thousand people blocked the Dinajpur-Dhaka highway for five hours, demanding Lye’s arrest and expulsion from Bangladesh. In Phulbari there were two days long protests outside GCM’s Bangladesh subsidiary Asia Energy's local office. Violent protests erupted where 2 were injured...
Views: 293 Socialist Party
Paycheck | Rob Portman for Senate
 
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Ted Strickland turned his back on Ohio when he went to work for an anti-coal, anti-gun, pro-tax liberal special interest group. First, Ted Strickland bragged about all the money he made in his "Dream Job," then he recounted how he's been running for Congress for 40 years, and now he touts his need for a paycheck. With articulate lines like this, it's no wonder Ted Strickland has repeatedly been called "invisible" and "stealth" for hiding from the media and the public. SUBSCRIBE for email updates ► robportman.com STAY CONNECTED! Subscribe on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/user/robportman2016 Like Us on Facebook ► https://facebook.com/robportman/ Follow Us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/robportman Follow Us on Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/portmanforsenate/ Add Us on SnapChat ► RobPortman2016 MEET ROB! After 12 years representing Southwest Ohio in Congress, Rob served in two cabinet level positions in the Bush Administration – including one where he proposed a balanced budget – came home for 3 years, then was elected to the Senate in 2010, winning by an impressive 18 points. Rob has built a reputation in the Senate as a conservative who gets things done for Ohioans and for our country. Rob has an A rating from the NRA and voted against the Democrats' bill to take away our 2nd Amendment rights. He has a 100% rating from National Right to Life and introduced his own legislation to protect the unborn. In the Senate, Rob has taken the lead in fighting against President Obama and Harry Reid's excessive spending. Rob supports a Balanced Budget Amendment, and he led the effort and got the entire Republican caucus to agree on his pro-growth Senate Republican Jobs Plan. Despite the gridlock in Congress, Rob has had 33 of his bills signed into law, including legislation to help combat drug abuse, to help stop human trafficking, to stop waste and fraud in government spending, and to reform federal worker retraining programs so they work better for Ohio. In 2014, Rob served as the National Finance Chairman of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee and everyone agrees he played a key role in winning a Republican majority in the United States Senate. Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, where he lives today with his wife, Jane. They have three children – and one dog – and have been married for 28 years.
The Most Dangerous Woman in America - PBS Nova Documentary - Closed Captions
 
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Typhoid Marry Documentary - The Most Dangerous Woman In America - National TV Mary Mallon (September 23, 1869-- Nov 11, 1938), better known as . Typhoid Mary. For episodes of Dark Matters, visit The real Typhoid Mary was an Irish immigrant who worked as a cook in . Mother Jones and the struggle against child labor in America. Many of the photos come from Mr. Louis Hine, hired by the Committee On Child Labor to document . Mother Jones: Labor organizer, hellraiser, the Miners Angel, forgotten icon of the labor movement.
Views: 156 r1KmAN
Child Labor Is Great! - Newt Gingrich
 
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Will child labor laws be repealed if Republican Newt Gingrich defeats President Obama's reelection bid in 2012? The Young Turks host Cenk Uygur explains. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/21/newt-gingrich-child-labor-lobbyist_n_1105178.html Subscribe to The Young Turks: http://bit.ly/eWuu5i The Largest Online New Show in the World. Google+: http://www.gplus.to/TheYoungTurks Facebook: Twitter: http://twitter.com/theyoungturks
Views: 50349 The Young Turks
Harsh winter kills livestock and causes psychological problems
 
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Adaatsag, Central Gobi Province, Mongolia - 10 February 1. Wide shot camels looking for food in snow 2. Mid shot camels 3. Close up camel eating grass through the snow 4. Pan from man clearing path of snow to child running into traditional "ger" felt tent 5. Man sitting in his "ger" looking at his children 6. Wide shot sick children being comforted 7. Child putting arm under blanket 8. Close up child's face Mandalgobi, Provincial capital of Central Gobi, Mongolia - 13 February 9. Wide shot Mandalgobi city 10. Mid shot smokey rooftops from coal burning 11. Wide exterior shot of School "No. 5" 12. Teacher writing on the board and speaking to kids 13. Mid shot of children in classroom still wearing jackets because of the cold 14. Pan from teachers to students sitting in another classroom 15. Mid shot students 16. SOUNDBITE: (Mongolia) Erdenebayar, 14 year-old student: "It's difficult to get books and notebooks and everything else we need at school. My mother often takes some things to a pawn shop where she can get a loan before sending me to school." 17. Mid shot of students, Buyantogtokh talking 18. SOUNDBITE: (Mongolian) Buyantogtokh, 15 year-old student: "Before this disaster, I've always dreamt of being a lawyer since the first grade but now that life conditions have changed, it's become so bad ..(cries)..I just feel like dropping out of school." Tsogt-ovoo, South Gobi, Mongolia - 12 February 19. Wide shot "ger" campment and animal shelter, 5km from Tsogt-ovoo county centre 20. Mid shot of same 21. Pan from local government officials visiting the "ger to Javzankhuu talking to a shy 16 year-old illiterate boy (his father to the right) 22. Mid shot of Javzankhuu Bayantsagaan, Central Province, Mongolia - 13 February 23. SOUNDBITE: (Mongolian) Javzankhuu, Senior officer of the Mongolian National Committee for Children, an agency under the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs: "One of the things that has drawn our attention is a change in the children's mental state. It's necessary to address this and help the children because even when the children don't directly participate in what happens at home, they suffer deeply and worry a lot." Mandalgobi, Provincial capital of Central Gobi, Mongolia - 11 February 24. Teacher overseeing students 25. Mid shot students doing written exercise 26. Close up students working together Beijing, China - 17 February 27. Set up shot of Hurtubise 28. SOUNDBITE: (English) France Hurtubise, Regional Information Delegate, International Federation of Red Cross: "Many of them will not have any education, they don't see any other choice in the future than to become a herder but if the current situation will be the same in the future, like this type of disaster, those children will end up facing the same situation there as their parents." Mandalgobi, Provincial capital of Central Gobi, Mongolia - 11 February 29. Wide shot herder on horseback with sheep goats Tsogt-ovoo, South Gobi, Mongolia - 12 February 30. Wide shot carcass of horse on Gobi desert 31. Mid shot of same Khuld, Central Gobi, Mongolia - 11 February 32. Mid shot herder waiting for his camel drinking water 33. Close up frozen pipe 34. Close up camel's face STORYLINE A severe winter in Mongolia is killing off tens of thousands of livestock and leading to diminishing food supplies, according to the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC). The way of life for thousands of herders in the disaster struck country is now threatened after a fourth consecutive winter crisis. The Red Cross is warning that poor herders, with no alternative livelihood, are on the edge of starvation. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/b43f73fb944173e59ff1a48932e7e02b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 32 AP Archive
"Teamsters" | Rob Portman for Senate
 
00:31
"Teamsters," features Sonny Nardi, Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters Ohio D.R.I.V.E.. Earlier this year, the Ohio Conference of Teamsters, representing over 50,000 members from across Ohio, endorsed Rob because they know Rob fights hard for Ohio's working families! SUBSCRIBE for email updates ► robportman.com STAY CONNECTED! Subscribe on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/user/robportman2016 Like Us on Facebook ► https://facebook.com/robportman/ Follow Us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/robportman Follow Us on Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/portmanforsenate/ Add Us on Snapchat ► RobPortman2016 MEET ROB! After 12 years representing Southwest Ohio in Congress, Rob served in two cabinet level positions in the Bush Administration – including one where he proposed a balanced budget – came home for 3 years, then was elected to the Senate in 2010, winning by an impressive 18 points. Rob has built a reputation in the Senate as a conservative who gets things done for Ohioans and for our country. Rob has an A rating from the NRA and voted against the Democrats' bill to take away our 2nd Amendment rights. He has a 100% rating from National Right to Life and introduced his own legislation to protect the unborn. In the Senate, Rob has taken the lead in fighting against President Obama and Harry Reid's excessive spending. Rob supports a Balanced Budget Amendment, and he led the effort and got the entire Republican caucus to agree on his pro-growth Senate Republican Jobs Plan. Despite the gridlock in Congress, Rob has had 33 of his bills signed into law, including legislation to help combat drug abuse, to help stop human trafficking, to stop waste and fraud in government spending, and to reform federal worker retraining programs so they work better for Ohio. In 2014, Rob served as the National Finance Chairman of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee and everyone agrees he played a key role in winning a Republican majority in the United States Senate. Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, where he lives today with his wife, Jane. They have three children – and one dog – and have been married for 28 years.
Views: 27754 Rob Portman for Senate
Ludlow Massacre // Colorado 2009 // Sam Phillips Interview With Film Makers
 
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Was on Tour With The Band Hobo Monk..and as we were driving We ran into Ludlow ..Said a Prayer and this film Makers ask to interview me..then i found out later that it was to become a historic landmark the next day. Funny How The Universe works sometimes........... The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado on April 20, 1914. The massacre resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 25 people; sources vary but all sources include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. The deaths occurred after a daylong fight between militia and camp guards against striking workers. Ludlow was the deadliest single incident in the southern Colorado Coal Strike, lasting from September 1913 through December 1914. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) against coal mining companies in Colorado. The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company (CF&I), the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company (RMF), and the Victor-American Fuel Company (VAF). In retaliation for Ludlow, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg.[1] The entire strike would cost between 69 and 199 lives. Thomas Franklin Andrews described it as the "deadliest strike in the history of the United States".[2] The Ludlow Massacre was a watershed moment in American labor relations. Historian Howard Zinn described the Ludlow Massacre as "the culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history".[3] Congress responded to public outcry by directing the House Committee on Mines and Mining to investigate the incident.[4] Its report, published in 1915, was influential in promoting child labor laws and an eight-hour work day. The Ludlow site, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Trinidad, Colorado, is now a ghost town. The massacre site is owned by the UMWA, which erected a granite monument in memory of the miners and their families who died that day.[5] The Ludlow Tent Colony Site was designated a National Historic Landmark on January 16, 2009, and dedicated on June 28, 2009.[5] Modern archeological investigation largely supports the strikers' reports of the event.[
Views: 1077 Sam Phillips
PBS NewsHour full episode March 12, 2019
 
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Tuesday on the NewsHour, the British Parliament rejects Prime Minister Theresa May’s amended deal for Brexit, throwing the UK’s impending EU departure into question. Plus, analysis of the drama around Brexit, more Boeing planes are grounded due to safety concerns, the experience of migrants requesting asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border, a bombshell college admissions scandal and That Moment When. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Could a no-deal Brexit be 'ruinous' for the UK? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAG9c3CLWYk 'Political meltdown' grips UK after May's Brexit defeat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96wAdlnyUCg News Wrap: Syria's Islamic State members urge global attacks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHFmj82Li_U Aviation expert: Impossible to say Boeing 737 MAX 8 is safe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80JPdRWjadI Agonizing 'limbo' awaits migrants seeking legal U.S. entry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWml2Alyyi4 Bribery scam reveals 'corruption' of college admissions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epZeq_SJ6cI&feature=youtu.be Tamar Manasseh on repairing the cracks in our communities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58TlGAZ0NNc Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 59426 PBS NewsHour
Cleveland's Biggest Enemy | Rob Portman for Senate
 
00:16
After losing his race for governor, Ted Strickland blamed Cleveland and said they got more than their 'fair share' while he was governor -- but greater Cleveland lost more than 76,000 jobs on his watch. We're reminding voters in Northeast Ohio that they simply cannot afford a return to Ted Strickland, who says Cleveland's biggest enemy is Cleveland. SUBSCRIBE for email updates ► robportman.com STAY CONNECTED! Subscribe on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/user/robportman2016 Like Us on Facebook ► https://facebook.com/robportman/ Follow Us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/robportman Follow Us on Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/portmanforsenate/ Add Us on Snapchat ► RobPortman2016 MEET ROB! After 12 years representing Southwest Ohio in Congress, Rob served in two cabinet level positions in the Bush Administration – including one where he proposed a balanced budget – came home for 3 years, then was elected to the Senate in 2010, winning by an impressive 18 points. Rob has built a reputation in the Senate as a conservative who gets things done for Ohioans and for our country. Rob has an A rating from the NRA and voted against the Democrats' bill to take away our 2nd Amendment rights. He has a 100% rating from National Right to Life and introduced his own legislation to protect the unborn. In the Senate, Rob has taken the lead in fighting against President Obama and Harry Reid's excessive spending. Rob supports a Balanced Budget Amendment, and he led the effort and got the entire Republican caucus to agree on his pro-growth Senate Republican Jobs Plan. Despite the gridlock in Congress, Rob has had 33 of his bills signed into law, including legislation to help combat drug abuse, to help stop human trafficking, to stop waste and fraud in government spending, and to reform federal worker retraining programs so they work better for Ohio. In 2014, Rob served as the National Finance Chairman of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee and everyone agrees he played a key role in winning a Republican majority in the United States Senate. Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, where he lives today with his wife, Jane. They have three children – and one dog – and have been married for 28 years.
Views: 23030 Rob Portman for Senate
Pakistan observes World Day Against Child Labour and other stories in JUST ASIA, Episode 175
 
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This week Just Asia begins with Pakistan, which observed World Day Against Child Labor on June 12. Despite official fanfare and praise, child labour continues to increase in the country, and child rights groups have criticized the government for not criminalizing it. Civil society is urging the government to formulate policies and laws to eliminate child labour and take cohesive and concrete steps to ending poverty, both of which are closely interconnected. In India, a 26-year-old law student was tortured by police in Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh. M Stalin was picked up by the police on suspicion of being part of a red sander smuggling network on June 4, and detained for 18 hours. Stalin pleaded with the officers to check up on his identity, but was ignored and tortured. Stalin is demanding action against the three constables who tortured him. Nepal’s Chief Justice Sushila Karki retired on June 7. Before leaving her office, the first woman Chief Justice revealed how Nepal’s judiciary, especially the Supreme Court, has long been bogged down in partisan politics and factionalism. She also exposed how judges often compromised their impartiality by seeking post-retirement appointments. Moving to Papua, Indonesia, the past one year has seen no improvement in the province’s human rights situation, particularly regarding freedom of expression and opinion. Most recently, members of the National Committee for West Papua (KNPB) and the Local People Assembly (PRD) were arbitrarily arrested and detained for organizing a peaceful assembly and prayer gathering in Wamena and Merauke on May 30-31. To learn more about the Papuan situation, Just Asia speaks to Mr. Theo Hesegem, Human Rights Defender from Wamena, Papua. Free speech is under assault in Bangladesh. The government is using Section 57 of the Information and Communication Technology Act to harass anyone raising their voice against government policies and actions online. As a result, many people have been put in jail for their Facebook comments. Civil society members and various professionals staged a protest last week, calling for the cancellation of Section 57 on the grounds of safeguarding freedom of speech. Finally, the Urgent Appeals Weekly features four cases from Sri Lanka and Indonesia. The bulletin can be watched online at www.alrc.asia/justasia and AHRC TV YouTube. We welcome both human rights feeds to be considered for weekly news bulletin, and your suggestions to improve our news channel. Please write to [email protected] You can also watch our Weekly Roundup on Facebook.
Views: 61 AHRC TV: JUST ASIA
Investigating Occupational Disease 1936 US Public Health Service
 
01:10
In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt selected Frances Perkins as Secretary of Labor and first woman Cabinet member. She brought to the Labor Department long experience in occupational safety and health with the State of New York. To help assure that workplaces would be "as safe as science and law can make them," Perkins created a Bureau of Labor Standards in 1934 as a rallying point for those interested in job safety and health. This was the first permanent Federal agency established primarily to promote safety and health for the entire work force. The Bureau helped State governments improve their administration of job safety and health laws and raise the level of their protective legislation. Congress enacted three laws as part of Roosevelt's New Deal which augmented the Federal Government's role in protecting people on the job. The Social Security Act of 1935 allowed the U.S. Public Health Service to fund industrial health programs run by State health departments. This made the Public Health Service, which had begun doing industrial health studies in 1914, the national leader in this field. The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which set a minimum wage and banned exploitative child labor, gave the Labor Department the power to bar workers under age 18 from dangerous occupations. The Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act of 1936 allowed the department to ban contract work done under hazardous conditions. Industrial hygiene is one of the most important topics in preventive medicine and hygiene, as it deals with the health, the welfare and the human rights of the vast majority of the adult population. Industrial hygiene is a subject in which the medical, economic and sociologic aspects are closely interwoven, and it requires a broad grasp, as well as an intimate knowledge of the conditions to avoid the dangers and correct the injustices to which people who work are subjected. Our tremendous base of knowledge and the availability of effective scientific methods for the investigation and conquest of occupational and environmental health hazards should give us cause for optimism in achieving the objectives of the Occupational Safety & Health Act and the Environmental Protection Act. Political will is the issue. Thus, "the history of occupational diseases is infinitely more than medical history . . . hazards and diseases changed with developing industries and whether any use was made of medical knowledge did not depend so much on the physicians as on the social organization under which the laborer performed his work . . . The history of occupational disease, therefore, reflects as in a mirror the history of industry and the history of labor, in other words some of the most important chapters in the history of human civilization" (Sigerist, 1943). SIGERIST, H.E. (1943). Quoted in Rosen, G. (1943). The History of Miners' Diseases. p. ix. Schuman, N.Y. For more, read A Short History of Occupational Health by H E R B E RT K. ABRAMS http://cavcominc.com/uploads/files/History_OccHealth_Abrams.pdf journal of public health policy • vol. 22, no. 1, 2001. This is clipped from the 1936 film The Work of the Public Health Service by the U.S. Public Health Service. This 52 minute film is available for downloading at the Internet Archive.
Views: 1219 markdcatlin
Silicosis Death / Maut Ka Dawat (Etv broadcast the story in March 2009)
 
22:09
In India, there are about 3 million workers formally employed in the formal economy with potential exposure to silica dust. Further, approximately 8.5 million more work in construction and some more exposed to silica dust in such a sectors called as unorganised/ informal economy which are not yet defined by the government based on specific policy that could differentiate formal/organised and informal/unorganised sectors. Thousands of these workers develop silicosis every year and die directly from it, or from secondary causes such as TB or lung cancer. However, relatively few of these deaths are recorded as being caused by silicosis or as being work-related in national statistics According to International Labor Organization's (ILO) Prevention of Occupational Diseases report that said 2.02 million--of the 2.34 million--died "from wide range of work-related diseases. 6,300 work-related death happen everyday and 5,500 are brought by work-related diseases while around 160 million cases of non-fatal work-related diseases occur annually. In India, the ILO said, about "10 million workers employed in mining, construction and various industries are exposed to silica dusts" and "some studies show that silicosis prevalence rates are 54.6 percent among slate pencil workers and 35.2 percent among stonecutters, while the coal-worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) prevalence rate is 18.8 percent." The ILO/WHO Joint Committee on Occupational Health launched in 1995 a Global Programme on the Elimination of Silicosis from the world by 2030. The objective of this Task Force is to further develop and implement this programme, to encourage every country to develop its own national silicosis elimination programme, and to provide a knowledge base for countries that wish to launch a national programme. Prevention of pneumoconiosis other than silicosis may be included as a part of the programmes at the regional and country levels, because occupational exposures to different kinds of dusts are widespread and the prevention and control activities for different forms of pneumoconiosis are to some extent related. But in India there is no such Occupational Disease Detection Centres/Units in majority of government and ESI hospitals. IMF chief Christine Lagarde today said pollution from coal generation plants causes about 70,000 premature deaths every year in India. Indian coal power plants kill 120,000 people a year, says Greenpeace Jharkhand is a mineral bearing State in India. History of mining and processing of metallic and non-metallic minerals in Jharkhand is more than 200 years old. More than 16000 dust generating units that include coal, copper, iron, uranium, bauxite, quartz, granite, and several thousand related industries and construction sites are currently operational. Nearly 55-60 Ramming Mass (Quartz Grinding) units, more than 15,000 stone crushers, 192 iron ore crushers, 40 sponge iron units which are in operation without any regulatory mechanism are identified as most hazardous units of Jharkhand. Two Ramming Mass units of Musaboni Block have claimed lives of 38 workers within 5-to 10 years, 16 cases are found confirmed silicosis who are alive and remaining 136 silica dust affected workers who have been suffering from lung ailment who need medical surveillances treatments and life care supports for increasing the expectancies of their lives. Considering the above facts and the older information available in different sources in public domain the conservative estimate is around 25-30 lakh workers are exposed to silicosis and other occupational lung diseases in Jharkhand. The children and women of this affected workers are worst victims because early cessation from their job and premature death put them in vulnerable situation that need to be addressed implementing legal provisions of social security for the affected workers and their family members.
Views: 664 ROSHNIPATH
[Wikipedia] Ludlow Massacre
 
31:38
The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado, on April 20, 1914. About two dozen people, including miners' wives and children, were killed. The chief owner of the mine, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., was widely criticized for the incident. The massacre, the culmination of an extensive strike against Colorado coal mines, resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 26 people; reported death tolls vary but include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. The deaths occurred after a daylong fight between militia and camp guards against striking workers. Ludlow was the deadliest single incident in the southern Colorado Coal Strike, which lasted from September 1913 through December 1914. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America against coal mining companies in Colorado. The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company, and the Victor-American Fuel Company. In retaliation for Ludlow, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg. The entire strike would cost between 69 and 199 lives. Thomas G. Andrews described it as the "deadliest strike in the history of the United States". The Ludlow Massacre was a watershed moment in American labor relations. Historian Howard Zinn described the Ludlow Massacre as "the culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history". Congress responded to public outcry by directing the House Committee on Mines and Mining to investigate the incident. Its report, published in 1915, was influential in promoting child labor laws and an eight-hour work day. The Ludlow site, 18 miles northwest of Trinidad, Colorado, is now a ghost town. The massacre site is owned by the United Mine Workers of America, which erected a granite monument in memory of the miners and their families who died that day. The Ludlow Tent Colony Site was designated a National Historic Landmark on January 16, 2009, and dedicated on June 28, 2009. Modern archeological investigation largely supports the strikers' reports of the event. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow_Massacre Please support this channel and help me upload more videos. Become one of my Patreons at https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3823907
Views: 15 WikiTubia
Tough Time | Rob Portman for Senate
 
01:03
"Disappointing." "Stealth." "Invisible." "Ghost." "Not speaking to any of the issues." Those are just a few of the words that pundits and Democrats have used recently to describe Ted Strickland and his campaign. Learn more ► retreadted.com SUBSCRIBE for email updates ► robportman.com STAY CONNECTED! Subscribe on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/user/robportman2016 Like Us on Facebook ► https://facebook.com/robportman/ Follow Us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/robportman Follow Us on Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/portmanforsenate/ Add Us on SnapChat ► RobPortman2016 MEET ROB! After 12 years representing Southwest Ohio in Congress, Rob served in two cabinet level positions in the Bush Administration – including one where he proposed a balanced budget – came home for 3 years, then was elected to the Senate in 2010, winning by an impressive 18 points. Rob has built a reputation in the Senate as a conservative who gets things done for Ohioans and for our country. Rob has an A rating from the NRA and voted against the Democrats' bill to take away our 2nd Amendment rights. He has a 100% rating from National Right to Life and introduced his own legislation to protect the unborn. In the Senate, Rob has taken the lead in fighting against President Obama and Harry Reid's excessive spending. Rob supports a Balanced Budget Amendment, and he led the effort and got the entire Republican caucus to agree on his pro-growth Senate Republican Jobs Plan. Despite the gridlock in Congress, Rob has had 33 of his bills signed into law, including legislation to help combat drug abuse, to help stop human trafficking, to stop waste and fraud in government spending, and to reform federal worker retraining programs so they work better for Ohio. In 2014, Rob served as the National Finance Chairman of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee and everyone agrees he played a key role in winning a Republican majority in the United States Senate. Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, where he lives today with his wife, Jane. They have three children – and one dog – and have been married for 28 years.
Leading Voices in Public Health - Black Lung
 
01:14:57
"The resurgence of black lung disease in Appalachian coal miners" September 26, 2017 David Blackley, James Crum, Scott Laney
Mango Distribution at SERUDS Orphanage
 
00:59
Serudsindia distributed seasonal fruits mangoes to the orphanage children. For more details visit: www.serudsindia.org Call Us: Mobile: +91 – 9849977577 Phone: +91 – (8518) 255626 Kurnool based grass root level NGO is involved in Charity work for Scheduled castes, Scheduled tribes, other backwards classes and Dalits. A Team of youth, who have passion in social service and compassion towards the sufferings of the disadvantaged sections of the society, came together and formed SERUDS. They have clear insight in the socio-economic and health issues faced by the downtrodden, under privileged and marginalized segments of the communities. SERUDS NGO India is a non-governmental, non-profit, social service voluntary organization working for an integrated development of women and children of vulnerable segment of the society. SERUDS believes that all human beings are equal and has the right to have good health and proper standard of living. SERUDS has touched new heights by Regular Activities to fulfil the mission of organization. Our executive committee oversees all the organization’s efforts. The committee meets regularly to ensure that all of our teams perform efficiently and to facilitate cross-functional connections. Our team of excellent staff, volunteers & members, who are dedicated, are available for any social cause (s) always. They are our real strength to carry on with the noble cause of uplifting the downtrodden and send a message “WE CARE & SUPPORT”. SERUDS was registered in the year 2003 under A.P. Societies Registration Act, 35 of 2001. It is also registered under the FCRA, 12A & 80G of Income Tax Exemption Act, 1961. SERUDS is completed due diligence norms and listed with CREDIBILITY ALLIANCE, VANIINDIA & GUIDE STARINDIA. SERUDS has been collaborating with foreign donor agencies, corporate, national donor agencies both governmental and non-governmental towards making meaningful interventions for the cause of poor and needy sections of the society.
Views: 31 Seruds India
NRI Samay Live-  Shantha Sinha, Magsaysay Award winner on Child Labor and Child Rights
 
35:00
Prof. Shantha Sinha is an anti-child labour activist of international reputation. She is the founder of Mamidipudi Venkatarangaiya Foundation, popularly known as MV Foundation (which is named in memory of her grandfather Mamidipudi Venkatarangaiah), and is a Professor in the Department of Political science in Hyderabad Central University. Currently, she heads the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights; The National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) was set up in March 2007 under the Commission for Protection of Child Rights Act, 2005, an Act of Parliament (December 2005). Professor Sinha is its first chairperson.
Views: 413 NRI Samay
America in World War I: Crash Course US History #30
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about American involvement in World War I, which at the time was called the Great War. They didn't know there was going to be a second one, though they probably should have guessed, 'cause this one didn't wrap up very neatly. So, the United States stayed out of World War I at first, because Americans were in an isolationist mood in the early 20th century. That didn't last though, as the affronts piled up and drew the US into the war. Spoiler alert: the Lusitania was sunk two years before we joined the war, so that wasn't the sole cause for our jumping in. It was part of it though, as was the Zimmerman telegram, unrestricted submarine warfare, and our affinity for the Brits. You'll learn the war's effects on the home front, some of Woodrow Wilson's XIV Points, and just how the war ended up expanding the power of the government in Americans' lives. Subbable message!!!: Jared Richardson says, "All true love is beautiful. Support your LGBT community." Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The complex secret alliances of Europe led to World War I: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/a-mad-dash-to-disaster-the-first-world-war It took several years before Americans joined the war: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/to-the-front-lines-america-in-world-war-i After the war, President Woodrow Wilson wanted to prevent a future World War, and promoted creating a League of Nations, established following the Treaty of Versailles: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-treaty-of-versailles-and-the-league-of-nations Follow Us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @br8ybrunch
Views: 2668770 CrashCourse
Clean Up Coal Ash
 
02:06
https://secure.earthjustice.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1747 Click above to take action to prevent the coal industry and their allies in Congress from weakening or eliminating the coal ash safeguards that Americans fought so hard for.
Views: 2431 Earthjustice
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part Two)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth"" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies.This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
Strangers in Their Own Land: Challenges Climbing the Empathy Wall
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:30 - Introduction by Dylan Riley 6:01 - Main Speaker - Arlie Hochschild 45:01 - Audience questions Arlie Hochschild describes her journey from Berkeley, her own liberal cultural enclave, to Louisiana, a conservative one. She explores her choice of research site, her effort to remove her own political alarm system, and during five years of research, to climb over what she calls an “empathy wall.” She focuses on her concept of the “deep story” – a version of which underlies all political belief, she argues, and will end with the possibilities of finding common ground across the political divide. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Show ID: 32997]
Understanding the Definition and Scope of the Duty to Consult....
 
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Understanding the Definition and Scope of the Duty to Consult and Accommodate Today and How It Impacts You Daniel Pagowski Legal Counsel‚ Department of Justice Aboriginal Law and Strategic Police Christopher Devlin Partner Devlin Gailus Barristers & Solicitors Sandra Gogal Partner Miller Thomson LLP How have recent case law developments shed light on the basic questions, such as: What is the scope of the duty to consult? When is the duty triggered? What is included in "contemplated Crown conduct"? How much of the duty can be delegated a) to municipalities? b) to proponents? How much of what proponents do, goes towards the discharge of the Crown's duty? How are Rio Tinto Alcan Inc. v. Carrier Sekani Tribal Council and Adams Lake Indian Band v. British Columbia being applied by lower courts? Clarifying the role of regulatory bodies with respect to the duty to consult Looking at how the B.C. Court of Appeal decision in West Moberly First Nations v. British Columbia (Chief Inspector of Mines) has further shaped the Crown's duty to consult with respect to past impacts and cumulative effects, and the issue of Crown accommodation Understanding how the recent trend towards complex partnership agreements is affecting accommodation by the Crown There have been developments since last year to the "definition and scope" of the duty to consult. Ensure you get all the crucial updates at The Canadian Institute's 7th Annual Forum on Aboriginal Law, Consultation & Accommodation on February 20-21, 2013 View the list of speakers, program agenda and register at www.CanadianInstitute.com/AboriginalLaw
Fall 2018 CNR Albright Lecture w/SPH Speaker Series: Van Jones
 
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Van Jones, Political Commentator, CNN; President and Founder, Dream Corps talk on Environmental Justice: What can we do about the disproportionate impact of climate change on low-income communities? Van Jones is president and founder of the nonprofit, Dream Corps, a social justice accelerator that backs initiatives that close prison doors and open doors of opportunity for all. Jones has led a number of other justice enterprises, including The Ella Baker Center for Human Rights and Color of Change. A Yale-educated attorney, Van has written three New York Times Bestsellers: The Green Collar Economy, the definitive book on green jobs; Rebuild the Dream, a roadmap for progressives; and most recently, Beyond the Messy Truth: How We Came apart, How We Come Together. In 2009, Van worked as the green jobs advisor to the Obama White House. Host of The Van Jones Show, he is a CNN correspondent and regular guest on political talk shows. This talk is the UC Berkeley College of Natural Resources Horace M. Albright Lecture in Conservation and also part of the UC Berkeley School of Public Health’s 75th Anniversary Speaker Series.
Views: 744 UC Berkeley Events
Thorium.
 
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http://ThoriumRemix.com/ Thorium is an abundant material which can be transformed into massive quantities of energy. To do so efficiently requires a very different nuclear reactor than the kind we use today- Not one that uses solid fuel rods, but a reactor in which the fuel is kept in a liquid state. Not one that uses pressurized water as a coolant, but a reactor that uses chemically stable molten salts. Such a reactor is called a "Molten Salt Reactor". Many different configurations are possible. Some of these configurations can harness Thorium very efficiently. This video explores the attributes of Molten Salt Reactors. Why are they compelling? And why do many people (including myself) see them as the only economical way of fully harnessing ALL our nuclear fuels... including Thorium. This video has been under development since 2012. I hope it conveys to you why I personally find Molten Salt Reactors so compelling, as do the many volunteers and supporters who helped create it. Much of the footage was shot by volunteers. All music was created by: http://kilowattsmusic.com To support this project, please visit: https://patreon.com/thorium Entities pursuing Molten Salt Reactors are... Flibe Energy - http://flibe-energy.com/ Terrestrial Energy - http://terrestrialenergy.com/ Moltex Energy - http://www.moltexenergy.com/ ThorCon Power - http://thorconpower.com/ Transatomic - http://www.transatomicpower.com/ Seaborg - http://seaborg.co/ Copenhagen Atomics - http://www.copenhagenatomics.com/ TerraPower - http://terrapower.com/ Bhabha Atomic Research Centre - http://www.barc.gov.in/ Chinese Academy of Sciences - http://english.cas.cn/ Regular Thorium conferences are organized by: http://thoriumenergyalliance.com/ http://thoriumenergyworld.com/ Table of Contents 0:00:00 Space 0:17:29 Constraints 0:28:22 Coolants 0:40:15 MSRE 0:48:54 Earth 0:59:46 Thorium 1:22:03 LFTR 1:36:13 Revolution 1:44:58 Forward 1:58:11 ROEI 2:05:41 Beginning 2:08:36 History 2:38:59 Dowtherm 2:47:57 Salt 2:51:44 Pebbles 3:06:07 India 3:18:44 Caldicott 3:35:55 Fission 3:56:22 Spectrum 4:04:25 Chemistry 4:12:51 Turbine 4:22:27 Waste 4:40:15 Decommission 4:54:39 Candlelight 5:13:06 Facts 5:26:08 Future 5:55:39 Pitches 5:56:17 Terrestrial 6:08:33 ThorCon 6:11:45 Flibe 6:20:51 End 6:25:53 Credits Some of this footage is remixed from non-MSR related sources, to help explain the importance of energy for both space exploration and everyday life here on Earth. Most prominently... Pandora's Promise - https://youtu.be/bDw3ET3zqxk Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson - https://youtu.be/Pun76NZMjCk Dr. Robert Zubrin - https://youtu.be/EKQSijn9FBs Mars Underground - https://youtu.be/tcTZvNLL0-w Andy Weir & Adam Savage - https://youtu.be/5SemyzKgaUU Periodic Table Videos - https://youtube.com/channel/UCtESv1e7ntJaLJYKIO1FoYw
Views: 139807 gordonmcdowell
SBCC Board of Trustees 2/14/2019
 
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Be advised: video includes explicit language
Views: 660 SBCCBoardofTrustees
Desire - Under Your Spell
 
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-No.2- Desire's 'Under Your Spell' set to the art of Roy Lichtenstein. (Please feel free to share any comments. Thanks.) -▽- Band Links: https://www.facebook.com/PRIMITIVEDESIRE https://www.italiansdoitbetter.com Disclaimer: For artistic purposes only. No copyright infringement intended.
Views: 45546072 The Prismer
Jay: A Rockefeller's Journey
 
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Why would the heir to one of the nation’s largest family fortunes would come to one of the poorest states in the nation - and stay? This documentary traces the 50-year public service career of John D. Rockefeller IV, while capturing much of the political history of West Virginia, his adopted home.
Anthony Scaramucci - Liberty University
 
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On November 1, 2017, at Convocation, North America's largest weekly gathering of Christian students, Anthony Scaramucci, American financier and political figure, shared about his time in the White House and stories that shaped his as a child. Convocation is North America’s largest weekly gathering of Christian students, and each year it plays host to more than 80 guest speakers of national significance from every sphere of society. http://www.liberty.edu
Views: 6498 Liberty University
Industrial Revolution | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Industrial Revolution Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840. This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, the increasing use of steam power, the development of machine tools and the rise of the factory system. Textiles were the dominant industry of the Industrial Revolution in terms of employment, value of output and capital invested. The textile industry was also the first to use modern production methods.The Industrial Revolution began in Great Britain, and many of the technological innovations were of British origin. By the mid-18th century Britain was the world's leading commercial nation, controlling a global trading empire with colonies in North America and the Caribbean, and with some political influence on the Indian subcontinent, through the activities of the East India Company. The development of trade and the rise of business were major causes of the Industrial Revolution.The Industrial Revolution marks a major turning point in history; almost every aspect of daily life was influenced in some way. In particular, average income and population began to exhibit unprecedented sustained growth. Some economists say that the major impact of the Industrial Revolution was that the standard of living for the general population began to increase consistently for the first time in history, although others have said that it did not begin to meaningfully improve until the late 19th and 20th centuries.GDP per capita was broadly stable before the Industrial Revolution and the emergence of the modern capitalist economy, while the Industrial Revolution began an era of per-capita economic growth in capitalist economies. Economic historians are in agreement that the onset of the Industrial Revolution is the most important event in the history of humanity since the domestication of animals and plants.Although the structural change from agriculture to industry is widely associated with Industrial Revolution, in United Kingdom it was already almost complete by 1760.The precise start and end of the Industrial Revolution is still debated among historians, as is the pace of economic and social changes. Eric Hobsbawm held that the Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 1780s and was not fully felt until the 1830s or 1840s, while T. S. Ashton held that it occurred roughly between 1760 and 1830. Rapid industrialization first began in Britain, starting with mechanized spinning in the 1780s, with high rates of growth in steam power and iron production occurring after 1800. Mechanized textile production spread from Great Britain to continental Europe and the United States in the early 19th century, with important centres of textiles, iron and coal emerging in Belgium and the United States and later textiles in France.An economic recession occurred from the late 1830s to the early 1840s when the adoption of the original innovations of the Industrial Revolution, such as mechanized spinning and weaving, slowed and their markets matured. Innovations developed late in the period, such as the increasing adoption of locomotives, steamboats and steamships, hot blast iron smelting and new technologies, such as the electrical telegraph, widely introduced in the 1840s and 1850s, were not powerful enough to drive high rates of growth. Rapid economic growth began to occur after 1870, springing from a new group of innovations in what has been called the Second Industrial Revolution. These new innovations included new steel making processes, the large-scale manufacture of machine tools and the use of increasingly advanced machinery in steam-powered factories.
Views: 82 wikipedia tts
Wyoming US House of Representatives Debate - 2018
 
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Debate among the four candidates for the Wyoming US House of Representatives Seat. Held on October 16, 2018 at the Little Theater, Central Wyoming College.
Views: 726 Wyoming PBS
FNN: Garbage truck lands in sinkhole; Asphalt spills halts I-10 E traffic; Trump Tax Returns Hearing
 
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Sharing a mix of breaking news, Arizona stories, engaging discussions, and popular culture.
Views: 25319 FOX 10 Phoenix
Safety - Khushbu safety ki in Hindi
 
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Safety is important part of any corporate or organization or in any person's life. This video of Aakar Empowerment shows some graphical representation of thinking towards safety. This will bring the self analysis towards safety. This video is also helpful for safety training and intervention.
ch 15) Self Help In Hard Times
 
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chapter 15: A People's History (Of The United States) Howard Zinn. ~ Chapter 15, "Self-Help in Hard Times" covers the government's campaign to destroy the IWW, and the factors leading to the Great Depression. Zinn states that, despite popular belief, the 1920s were not a time of prosperity, and the problems of the Depression were simply the chronic problems of the poor extended to the rest of the society. Also covered is the Communist Party's attempts to help the poor during the Depression.
Views: 6435 andi burridge