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Depressing Vintage Photos of Child Labor In USA 1908- 1912
 
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After the Civil War, the availability of natural resources, new inventions, and a receptive market combined to fuel an industrial boom. The demand for labor grew, and in the late 19th and early 20th centuries many children were drawn into the labor force. Factory wages were so low that children often had to work to help support their families. The number of children under the age of 15 who worked in industrial jobs for wages climbed from 1.5 million in 1890 to 2 million in 1910. Businesses liked to hire children because they worked in unskilled jobs for lower wages than adults, and their small hands made them more adept at handling small parts and tools. Children were seen as part of the family economy. Immigrants and rural migrants often sent their children to work, or worked alongside them. However, child laborers barely experienced their youth. Going to school to prepare for a better future was an opportunity these underage workers rarely enjoyed. As children worked in industrial settings, they began to develop serious health problems. Many child laborers were underweight. Some suffered from stunted growth and curvature of the spine. They developed diseases related to their work environment, such as tuberculosis and bronchitis for those who worked in coal mines or cotton mills. They faced high accident rates due to physical and mental fatigue caused by hard work and long hours. Lewis Hine (September 26, 1874 – November 3, 1940) was an American sociologist and photographer. Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States. In 1908, he became the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC), leaving his teaching position. Over the next decade, Hine documented child labor, with focus on labor in the Carolina Piedmont, in American industry to aid the NCLC’s lobbying efforts to end the practice. By 1916, Congress passed the Keating-Owens Act that established the following child labor standards: a minimum age of 14 for workers in manufacturing and 16 for workers in mining; a maximum workday of 8 hours; prohibition of night work for workers under age 16; and a documentary proof of age. By 1920 the number of child laborers was cut to nearly half of what it had been in 1910. “There is work that profits children, and there is work that brings profit only to employers. The object of employing children is not to train them, but to get high profits from their work”. – Lewis Hine, 1908. *********************************************************************** -Music: Air Prelude by: Kevin MacLeod -Music Download Link: https://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100337
Views: 8538 Luth Luther
Lewis Hine against child labour
 
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Lewis Hine is most famous for his photographs of the construction workers who helped build the Empire State Building in 1930. But in the years before he celebrated the heroic labour of these men working high above Manhattan, Hine used his photographs to campaign for social reform. In 1908 the then-sociology professor was hired by the National Child Labor Committee to document how children as young as seven were working in cotton mills and coal mines. Over a decade he took thousands of photographs that helped convince US lawmakers to introduce new industrial regulations to protect children.
Views: 8139 Lloyd Share
Elegant Machinery, Do You Know
 
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Elegant Machinery - Do You Know -By the early 1900s many Americans were calling child labour "child slavery" and were demanding an end to it. They argued that long hours of work deprived children of the opportunity of an education to prepare themselves for a better future. Instead, child labour condemned them to a future of illiteracy, poverty, and continuing misery. In 1904 a group of progressive reformers founded the National Child Labor Committee, an organization whose goal was the abolition of child labor. The organization received a charter from Congress in 1907. It hired teams of investigators to gather evidence of children working in harsh conditions and then organized exhibitions with photographs and statistics to dramatize the plight of these children. Lewis Hine, a New York City schoolteacher and photographer, believed that a picture could tell a powerful story. He felt so strongly about the abuse of children as workers that he quit his teaching job and became an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee. Hine traveled around the country photographing the working conditions of children in all types of industries. He photographed children in coal mines, in meatpacking houses, in textile mills, and in canneries. He took pictures of children working in the streets as shoe shiners, newsboys, and hawkers. In many instances he tricked his way into factories to take the pictures that factory managers did not want the public to see. Lewis Hine died in poverty, neglected by all but a few. His reputation continued to grow, however, and now he is recognized as a master American photographer. His photographs remind us what it was like to be a child and to labor like an adult at a time when labor was harsher than it is now. Hine's images of working children stirred America's conscience and helped changed the nation's labour laws.
Views: 6380 CarminaBarritus
Beyond Their Years
 
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The is a slideshow featuring photographs taken by Lewis Hine during the first decade of the 20th century. Mr. Hine was an activist fighting for reform of child labor laws in the US. He photographed children working in the most horible conditions imaginable. For more wonderful high-def images visit http://www.shorpy.com
Views: 125919 reluctantpaladin
Child Labor in NYC in the 1900's
 
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It's 1907 in New York, NY. I'm Dominique Parker, a member of the National Child Labor Committee. I will be interviewed by Alexis Amaguana, a reporter from News 4, about Child Labor laws. Younji Park is the producer for News channel 4.
Views: 666 L Fontaine
Anthracite Fields wins 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Music
 
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Julia Wolfe's Anthracite Fields, an oratorio for chorus and instruments, has been awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Music. Wolfe drew on oral histories, interviews, speeches, geographic descriptions, children’s rhymes, and coal advertisements to create a work that gives an intimate look at a particular slice of American life. Cited by the Pulitzer committee as "a powerful oratorio for chorus and sextet evoking Pennsylvania coal-mining life around the turn of the 20th Century," the work premiered at the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia last April followed by a performance at the NY PHIL BIENNIAL in May. It was met with rave reviews. The New York Times wrote, “In Ms. Wolfe’s polished and stylistically assured cantata, the overall coherence of the musical material helped her expressions of outrage to burn cleanly and brightly.” The Philadelphia Inquirer praised the piece for creating “an alternate universe.” Anthracite Fields will be released on Cantaloupe Music this September, in a recording that features the Bang on a Can All-Stars and The Choir of Trinity Wall Street with Julian Wachner conducting. The next performance will be in March 2016 with the Los Angeles Master Chorale. "My aim with Anthracite Fields is to honor the people who persevered and endured in the Pennsylvania Anthracite coal region during a time when the industry fueled the nation, and to reveal a bit about who we are as American workers." Named after the technical term for the purest form of coal, anthracite, Anthracite Fields was written after Wolfe did extensive research about the coal mining industry in an area very near where she grew up in Pennsylvania. She writes, "In some ways the piece is a return to my small town Pennsylvania roots. In looking north – the left turn onto route 309, the road-rarely-taken – I delved into a local history.” Anthracite Fields is written in five movements: Foundation: The singers chant the names of miners that appeared on a Pennsylvania Mining Accident index 1869-1916. At the center of Foundation is text from geological descriptions of coal formation. Breaker Boys: In the center of this movement are the words of Anthony (Shorty) Slick, who worked as a breaker boy. The interview is taken from the documentary film America and Lewis Hine, directed by Nina Rosenblum. Hine worked for the National Child Labor Committee and served as chief photographer for the WPA. Speech: The text is adapted from an excerpt of a speech by John L. Lewis, who served as president of the United Mine Workers of America. Flowers: Flowers was inspired by an interview with Barbara Powell, daughter and granddaughter of miners. In one interview Barbara said, “We all had gardens,” and then she began to list the names of flowers. Appliances: Even today coal is fueling the nation, powering electricity. The closing words of Anthracite Fields are taken from an advertising campaign for the coal-powered railroad. In 1900 Ernest Elmo Calkins created a fictitious character, a New York socialite named Phoebe Snow, who rode the rails to Buffalo. It used to be a dirty business to ride a train. But with the diamond of coal her “gown stayed white from morn till night, on the road to Anthracite.” Anthracite Fields was commissioned through Meet the Composer’s Commissioning Music/USA program, which is made possible by generous support from the Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Helen F. Whitaker Fund. Additional support was made possible through the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia Alan Harler New Ventures Fund; The Presser Foundation; The Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; the National Endowment for the Arts; The Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia, and the Aaron Copland Fund for Music.
Views: 4621 RedPoppyMusic
960. Come All You Coal Miners (Sarah Ogan Gunning)
 
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Sarah Garland Gunning (later Sarah Ogan Gunning) was the tenth of 11 children in a Kentucky mining family, at a time when miners were paid less than a dollar and a half for a ten-hour day and worked in appalling conditions. Her father, Jim Garland, was blacklisted as he represented the miners in their fight for better wages, forcing him to use aliases in order go work in the mines. In 1931, a group of Northerners called the Dreiser Committee came to Kentucky to investigate atrocities committed against the miners, and brought their plight to national attention. Sarah Garland and her sister, Molly (later known as Aunt Molly Jackson) wrote and sang songs in support of the struggle at labor rallies. They were taken to New York by members of the Dreiser Committee to help raise money for the miners' cause. Sarah, who was suffering from brown lung disease met folk singers like Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger and Lee Hays, who went on to record her songs. After successful treatment for tuberculosis treatment she retired from performing, but returned in the '60s to perform at several major folk festivals. Her half brother, Jim Garland, wrote "I Don't Want Your Millions, Mister", which I have already uploaded to YouTube. This song, written in 1937, is typical of her work. It has been recorded by Uncle Tupelo, who sings it from the perspective of a coal miner, rather than a coal miner's wife as in the original version, and also by Mike Seeger. Lyrics of this song can be found here: http://www.raymondfolk.com/page/Come+All+You+Coal+Miners+%28Sarah+Ogan+Gunning%29 To see a playlist of all my a capella songs go to: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E81659B9EA983BB2 You can see a playlist of my mining songs here: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=CF909DA14CE415DF For lyrics and chords of all my songs, please see my website: http://raymondfolk.wikifoundry.com
Views: 2680 raymondcrooke
The dark history of conscription and forced labor behind Japan's Hashima Island,
 
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하시마섬 유네스코 세계유산 등재 2년... 그 후? Hashima island. One of dozens of controversial sites Japan has pushed to gain UNESCO World Heritage recognition. A proud symbol of Japan's rapid industrialization. Contrary to the image Tokyo is promoting it's where hundreds of Koreans were taken and forced into labor in deadly undersea coal mines. Oh Jung-hee met with the few survivors to hear their stories. A 15-second-long video has been lighting up New York's Times Square since Monday. It aims to shed light on a less well-known aspect of Hashima Island -- one of Japan's UNESCO World Heritage sites. "It's a fact that the island is listed as a world heritage site. So our ad starts with this fact, and then delves deeper into forced conscription and the 120 victims. It ends by saying that Hashima's true name is 'island of hell.'" Roughly 15 kilometers away from the city of Nagasaki in southwestern Japan... lies the uninhabited island of Hashima. Surrounded by a sea wall, and full of abandoned concrete buildings,... the island resembles a battleship, which is why it's commonly called Gunkanjima or "Battleship Island." The island is recognized as a symbol of Japan's rapid industrialization,... but has a dark history of conscription and forced labor. From 1940 to 1945, five hundred to eight hundred Koreans were forcibly taken to Hashima Island. Kim Hyung-seob is one of them. The exact date that he was taken to Japan -- November 17th, 1943 -- is one he can never forget. "I don't even want to talk about it. I can't explain how much we suffered. Eating was the biggest problem. They gave us dried sweet potato, beans and bean dregs. That's what they called 'food' for us." Korean laborers were neither well-fed nor well-paid.. And they had to spend more than 12 hours a day in the coal mine,... which is 1-thousand meters under the sea. Lee In-un is another survivor. He says... some laborers desperately tried to escape from 'hell'... but failed. "The land was visible from the island. It was right across the sea. Some tried to escape by swimming and holding onto wooden panels. But they died." "The dreary atmosphere of Hashima island can be seen through these photos here. And what's clearly noticeable is the difference in living environments between Japanese citizens and Korean laborers. The Japanese citizens living in modern, newly built apartments. In contrast, five hundred to eight hundred Korean laborers were crammed into these small buildings." Hashima Island was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015,... as one of the places symbolizing Japan's Meiji Industrial Revolution. When Japan got the endorsement of the UNESCO advisory committee ICOMOS, Korea strongly protested against it,... claiming that having these places as world heritage sites hurts the victims' and UNESCO's dignity. At the 2015 UNESCO official meeting, Japan, for the first time on the international stage,... acknowledged there was forced labor. "There were a large number of Koreans and others who were brought against their will and forced to work under harsh conditions in the 1940s at some of the sites." But that was immediately reversed by the Japanese foreign minister Fumio Kishida. "The expression 'forced to work' does not mean 'forced labor.'" ICOMOS recommended that Japan take measures to help visitors understand the 'full history' of the sites... and Japan promised to establish information and commemoration centers. While an implementation report on that is due December 1st this year,... not much action has been taken within Japan. "According to what we're hearing from civil groups in Japan,... signboards installed at the facilities don't explain at all about conscription and forced labor. Rather, the authorities are interviewing the Japanese people who lived on the island back then... who say Hashima was not an 'island of hell' like what Koreans say." The Korean government is to raise the issue at the annual UNESCO World Heritage Committee meeting... currently taking place in Poland. The government expressed regret that no tangible measures have been taken in Japan over the last two years... and highlighted Japan's promise is not only an agreement with Korea, but with the whole world. Having an agreed view on history and remembering it is crucial in heading toward the future. For Korea, the first step would be recognizing Hashima Island and others as legacies of Japan's industrialization... and for Japan, to face the fact that colonization contributed to its industrialization. Oh Jung-hee, Arirang News. Visit ‘Arirang News’ Official Pages Facebook(NEWS): http://www.facebook.com/newsarirang Homepage: http://www.arirang.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld
Views: 32714 ARIRANG NEWS
Can Photography End Child Labor?
 
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Subscribe! http://skr.cm/SubscribeToStories Watch more episodes! http://bit.ly/1SiejNW In 1916, photographer Lewis Wickes Hine helped put a stop to child labor in America by documenting young children in the workforce. See how photographers today are trying to do the same in Bangladesh and beyond. This weekly storytelling series uses the imagery of photographers and adventurers around the world to give us a deeper connection to and understanding of the human condition. Watch Seeker's content days before anyone else, click here for a free 30 day subscription to Vessel: http://skr.cm/seekeratvessel Join the Seeker community! Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeekerNetwork Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Seeker-Network/872690716088418?ref=hl Instagram: http://instagram.com/seekernetwork Tumblr: http://seekernetwork.tumblr.com Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/100537624873180533713/about iOS app: http://seekernetwork.com/ios
Views: 60260 Stories
Introduction to Labour History
 
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This series of five short videos (stitched together here for continuous watching) serve as introductions to the topics in AUPE's Introduction to Labour History course. The five topics are: The Origins of Unions; Industrial Unions; Public Sector Unions; Widening the Circle (Marginalized Workers and Unions); and Preserving and Sharing Our Stories.
Views: 11946 AlbertaUnion
From Coal Miners to Teachers: West Virginia Continues to Lead Radical Labor Struggle in the U.S.
 
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https://democracynow.org - For decades, West Virginia has been at the forefront of labor activism in the United States. As the state’s teachers continue their historic strike, which has shut down every single West Virginia school, we look at the history of the labor activism in the Mountain State. We speak with Jay O’Neal, a middle school teacher and a union activist in Charleston, West Virginia. And we speak with Mike Elk, senior labor reporter at Payday Report. His most recent piece is titled “West Virginia Teachers’ Strike Fever Starting to Spread to Other States.” Democracy Now! is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on nearly 1,400 TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9AM ET: https://democracynow.org Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today: https://democracynow.org/donate FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: http://facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: https://twitter.com/democracynow YouTube: http://youtube.com/democracynow SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/democracynow Daily Email: https://democracynow.org/subscribe Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DemocracyNow Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow Tumblr: http://democracynow.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/democracynow iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/democracy-now!-audio/id73802554 TuneIn: http://tunein.com/radio/Democracy-Now-p90/ Stitcher Radio: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/democracy-now
Views: 4089 Democracy Now!
Dolores Huerta, "Living Self-Portrait" interview
 
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"Living Self-Portrait" interview with Dolores Huerta. She was interviewed by Taína Caragol, curator of Latino art and history at the National Portrait Gallery on September 24, 2015. Through her example as a labor and civil rights leader, and her challenge to norms that restrict women’s role in society, Dolores Huerta became an early symbol of female power for the Chicano and feminist movements.
Paycheck | Rob Portman for Senate
 
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Ted Strickland turned his back on Ohio when he went to work for an anti-coal, anti-gun, pro-tax liberal special interest group. First, Ted Strickland bragged about all the money he made in his "Dream Job," then he recounted how he's been running for Congress for 40 years, and now he touts his need for a paycheck. With articulate lines like this, it's no wonder Ted Strickland has repeatedly been called "invisible" and "stealth" for hiding from the media and the public. SUBSCRIBE for email updates ► robportman.com STAY CONNECTED! Subscribe on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/user/robportman2016 Like Us on Facebook ► https://facebook.com/robportman/ Follow Us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/robportman Follow Us on Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/portmanforsenate/ Add Us on SnapChat ► RobPortman2016 MEET ROB! After 12 years representing Southwest Ohio in Congress, Rob served in two cabinet level positions in the Bush Administration – including one where he proposed a balanced budget – came home for 3 years, then was elected to the Senate in 2010, winning by an impressive 18 points. Rob has built a reputation in the Senate as a conservative who gets things done for Ohioans and for our country. Rob has an A rating from the NRA and voted against the Democrats' bill to take away our 2nd Amendment rights. He has a 100% rating from National Right to Life and introduced his own legislation to protect the unborn. In the Senate, Rob has taken the lead in fighting against President Obama and Harry Reid's excessive spending. Rob supports a Balanced Budget Amendment, and he led the effort and got the entire Republican caucus to agree on his pro-growth Senate Republican Jobs Plan. Despite the gridlock in Congress, Rob has had 33 of his bills signed into law, including legislation to help combat drug abuse, to help stop human trafficking, to stop waste and fraud in government spending, and to reform federal worker retraining programs so they work better for Ohio. In 2014, Rob served as the National Finance Chairman of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee and everyone agrees he played a key role in winning a Republican majority in the United States Senate. Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, where he lives today with his wife, Jane. They have three children – and one dog – and have been married for 28 years.
[Wikipedia] Ludlow Massacre
 
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The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado, on April 20, 1914. About two dozen people, including miners' wives and children, were killed. The chief owner of the mine, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., was widely criticized for the incident. The massacre, the culmination of an extensive strike against Colorado coal mines, resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 26 people; reported death tolls vary but include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. The deaths occurred after a daylong fight between militia and camp guards against striking workers. Ludlow was the deadliest single incident in the southern Colorado Coal Strike, which lasted from September 1913 through December 1914. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America against coal mining companies in Colorado. The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company, and the Victor-American Fuel Company. In retaliation for Ludlow, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg. The entire strike would cost between 69 and 199 lives. Thomas G. Andrews described it as the "deadliest strike in the history of the United States". The Ludlow Massacre was a watershed moment in American labor relations. Historian Howard Zinn described the Ludlow Massacre as "the culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history". Congress responded to public outcry by directing the House Committee on Mines and Mining to investigate the incident. Its report, published in 1915, was influential in promoting child labor laws and an eight-hour work day. The Ludlow site, 18 miles northwest of Trinidad, Colorado, is now a ghost town. The massacre site is owned by the United Mine Workers of America, which erected a granite monument in memory of the miners and their families who died that day. The Ludlow Tent Colony Site was designated a National Historic Landmark on January 16, 2009, and dedicated on June 28, 2009. Modern archeological investigation largely supports the strikers' reports of the event. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow_Massacre Please support this channel and help me upload more videos. Become one of my Patreons at https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3823907
Views: 19 WikiTubia
UMW President John Llewellyn Lewis addresses the gathering as coal strike ends in...HD Stock Footage
 
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Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675073038_coal-strike-ends_John-Lewis_Henry-Bridges_Joseph-Martin_United-Mine-Workers-President Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. UMW President John Llewellyn Lewis addresses the gathering as coal strike ends in Washington DC. Coal strike ends in Washington DC. President of the United Mine Workers (UMW) of America, John Llewellyn Lewis arrives at the UMW building. US Senator Henry Styles Bridges also arrives. Photographers take photographs. Lewis and coal operators remain seated at office after the agreement. Lewis addresses the gathering. Bridges meets with Speaker of the US House of Representatives Joseph William Martin for the settlement. Railroad loaded with coal moves on track. Location: Washington DC. Date: April 12, 1948. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.
Views: 918 CriticalPast
The Election Countdown | Q&A
 
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This episode was broadcast Monday, 29 April 2019. Mitch Fifield, Minister for Communications; Chris Bowen, Shadow Treasurer; Lenore Taylor, Editor, The Guardian Australia; Bhakthi Puvanenthiran, Managing Editor of Crikey; and Greg Sheridan, Foreign Affairs Editor, The Australian. Our panellists discussed Clive Palmer and the United Australia Party, child care, franking credits, negative gearing, superannuation, #watergate, and the NBN. For more from Q&A, click here: http://www.abc.net.au/qanda Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/QandA Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abcqanda/ Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://ab.co/2E3pCZ9 Q&A is a television discussion program that focuses mostly on politics but ranges across all of the big issues that set Australians thinking, talking and debating. It is driven by interaction: Q&A provides a rare opportunity for Australian citizens to directly question and hold to account politicians and key opinion leaders in a national public forum and Q&A is broadcast live so that not only the studio audience but also the wider audience can get involved. We aim to create a discussion that is constructive, that reflects a diverse range of views and that provides a safe environment where people can respectfully discuss their differences. It’s impossible to represent every view on a single panel or in one audience but we’re committed to giving participants a fair go. In order to be as inclusive and diverse as possible, the program is presented from a range of locations around the country and all Australians are encouraged to get involved through social media as well as by joining the audience. This is an official Australian Broadcasting Corporation YouTube channel.
Views: 23660 abcqanda
Cleveland's Biggest Enemy | Rob Portman for Senate
 
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After losing his race for governor, Ted Strickland blamed Cleveland and said they got more than their 'fair share' while he was governor -- but greater Cleveland lost more than 76,000 jobs on his watch. We're reminding voters in Northeast Ohio that they simply cannot afford a return to Ted Strickland, who says Cleveland's biggest enemy is Cleveland. SUBSCRIBE for email updates ► robportman.com STAY CONNECTED! Subscribe on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/user/robportman2016 Like Us on Facebook ► https://facebook.com/robportman/ Follow Us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/robportman Follow Us on Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/portmanforsenate/ Add Us on Snapchat ► RobPortman2016 MEET ROB! After 12 years representing Southwest Ohio in Congress, Rob served in two cabinet level positions in the Bush Administration – including one where he proposed a balanced budget – came home for 3 years, then was elected to the Senate in 2010, winning by an impressive 18 points. Rob has built a reputation in the Senate as a conservative who gets things done for Ohioans and for our country. Rob has an A rating from the NRA and voted against the Democrats' bill to take away our 2nd Amendment rights. He has a 100% rating from National Right to Life and introduced his own legislation to protect the unborn. In the Senate, Rob has taken the lead in fighting against President Obama and Harry Reid's excessive spending. Rob supports a Balanced Budget Amendment, and he led the effort and got the entire Republican caucus to agree on his pro-growth Senate Republican Jobs Plan. Despite the gridlock in Congress, Rob has had 33 of his bills signed into law, including legislation to help combat drug abuse, to help stop human trafficking, to stop waste and fraud in government spending, and to reform federal worker retraining programs so they work better for Ohio. In 2014, Rob served as the National Finance Chairman of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee and everyone agrees he played a key role in winning a Republican majority in the United States Senate. Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, where he lives today with his wife, Jane. They have three children – and one dog – and have been married for 28 years.
Views: 23034 Rob Portman for Senate
Child Labor Is Great! - Newt Gingrich
 
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Will child labor laws be repealed if Republican Newt Gingrich defeats President Obama's reelection bid in 2012? The Young Turks host Cenk Uygur explains. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/21/newt-gingrich-child-labor-lobbyist_n_1105178.html Subscribe to The Young Turks: http://bit.ly/eWuu5i The Largest Online New Show in the World. Google+: http://www.gplus.to/TheYoungTurks Facebook: Twitter: http://twitter.com/theyoungturks
Views: 50362 The Young Turks
"Teamsters" | Rob Portman for Senate
 
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"Teamsters," features Sonny Nardi, Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters Ohio D.R.I.V.E.. Earlier this year, the Ohio Conference of Teamsters, representing over 50,000 members from across Ohio, endorsed Rob because they know Rob fights hard for Ohio's working families! SUBSCRIBE for email updates ► robportman.com STAY CONNECTED! Subscribe on YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/user/robportman2016 Like Us on Facebook ► https://facebook.com/robportman/ Follow Us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/robportman Follow Us on Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/portmanforsenate/ Add Us on Snapchat ► RobPortman2016 MEET ROB! After 12 years representing Southwest Ohio in Congress, Rob served in two cabinet level positions in the Bush Administration – including one where he proposed a balanced budget – came home for 3 years, then was elected to the Senate in 2010, winning by an impressive 18 points. Rob has built a reputation in the Senate as a conservative who gets things done for Ohioans and for our country. Rob has an A rating from the NRA and voted against the Democrats' bill to take away our 2nd Amendment rights. He has a 100% rating from National Right to Life and introduced his own legislation to protect the unborn. In the Senate, Rob has taken the lead in fighting against President Obama and Harry Reid's excessive spending. Rob supports a Balanced Budget Amendment, and he led the effort and got the entire Republican caucus to agree on his pro-growth Senate Republican Jobs Plan. Despite the gridlock in Congress, Rob has had 33 of his bills signed into law, including legislation to help combat drug abuse, to help stop human trafficking, to stop waste and fraud in government spending, and to reform federal worker retraining programs so they work better for Ohio. In 2014, Rob served as the National Finance Chairman of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee and everyone agrees he played a key role in winning a Republican majority in the United States Senate. Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, where he lives today with his wife, Jane. They have three children – and one dog – and have been married for 28 years.
Views: 27798 Rob Portman for Senate
Pakistan observes World Day Against Child Labour and other stories in JUST ASIA, Episode 175
 
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This week Just Asia begins with Pakistan, which observed World Day Against Child Labor on June 12. Despite official fanfare and praise, child labour continues to increase in the country, and child rights groups have criticized the government for not criminalizing it. Civil society is urging the government to formulate policies and laws to eliminate child labour and take cohesive and concrete steps to ending poverty, both of which are closely interconnected. In India, a 26-year-old law student was tortured by police in Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh. M Stalin was picked up by the police on suspicion of being part of a red sander smuggling network on June 4, and detained for 18 hours. Stalin pleaded with the officers to check up on his identity, but was ignored and tortured. Stalin is demanding action against the three constables who tortured him. Nepal’s Chief Justice Sushila Karki retired on June 7. Before leaving her office, the first woman Chief Justice revealed how Nepal’s judiciary, especially the Supreme Court, has long been bogged down in partisan politics and factionalism. She also exposed how judges often compromised their impartiality by seeking post-retirement appointments. Moving to Papua, Indonesia, the past one year has seen no improvement in the province’s human rights situation, particularly regarding freedom of expression and opinion. Most recently, members of the National Committee for West Papua (KNPB) and the Local People Assembly (PRD) were arbitrarily arrested and detained for organizing a peaceful assembly and prayer gathering in Wamena and Merauke on May 30-31. To learn more about the Papuan situation, Just Asia speaks to Mr. Theo Hesegem, Human Rights Defender from Wamena, Papua. Free speech is under assault in Bangladesh. The government is using Section 57 of the Information and Communication Technology Act to harass anyone raising their voice against government policies and actions online. As a result, many people have been put in jail for their Facebook comments. Civil society members and various professionals staged a protest last week, calling for the cancellation of Section 57 on the grounds of safeguarding freedom of speech. Finally, the Urgent Appeals Weekly features four cases from Sri Lanka and Indonesia. The bulletin can be watched online at www.alrc.asia/justasia and AHRC TV YouTube. We welcome both human rights feeds to be considered for weekly news bulletin, and your suggestions to improve our news channel. Please write to [email protected] You can also watch our Weekly Roundup on Facebook.
Views: 62 AHRC TV: JUST ASIA
Investigating Occupational Disease 1936 US Public Health Service
 
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In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt selected Frances Perkins as Secretary of Labor and first woman Cabinet member. She brought to the Labor Department long experience in occupational safety and health with the State of New York. To help assure that workplaces would be "as safe as science and law can make them," Perkins created a Bureau of Labor Standards in 1934 as a rallying point for those interested in job safety and health. This was the first permanent Federal agency established primarily to promote safety and health for the entire work force. The Bureau helped State governments improve their administration of job safety and health laws and raise the level of their protective legislation. Congress enacted three laws as part of Roosevelt's New Deal which augmented the Federal Government's role in protecting people on the job. The Social Security Act of 1935 allowed the U.S. Public Health Service to fund industrial health programs run by State health departments. This made the Public Health Service, which had begun doing industrial health studies in 1914, the national leader in this field. The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which set a minimum wage and banned exploitative child labor, gave the Labor Department the power to bar workers under age 18 from dangerous occupations. The Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act of 1936 allowed the department to ban contract work done under hazardous conditions. Industrial hygiene is one of the most important topics in preventive medicine and hygiene, as it deals with the health, the welfare and the human rights of the vast majority of the adult population. Industrial hygiene is a subject in which the medical, economic and sociologic aspects are closely interwoven, and it requires a broad grasp, as well as an intimate knowledge of the conditions to avoid the dangers and correct the injustices to which people who work are subjected. Our tremendous base of knowledge and the availability of effective scientific methods for the investigation and conquest of occupational and environmental health hazards should give us cause for optimism in achieving the objectives of the Occupational Safety & Health Act and the Environmental Protection Act. Political will is the issue. Thus, "the history of occupational diseases is infinitely more than medical history . . . hazards and diseases changed with developing industries and whether any use was made of medical knowledge did not depend so much on the physicians as on the social organization under which the laborer performed his work . . . The history of occupational disease, therefore, reflects as in a mirror the history of industry and the history of labor, in other words some of the most important chapters in the history of human civilization" (Sigerist, 1943). SIGERIST, H.E. (1943). Quoted in Rosen, G. (1943). The History of Miners' Diseases. p. ix. Schuman, N.Y. For more, read A Short History of Occupational Health by H E R B E RT K. ABRAMS http://cavcominc.com/uploads/files/History_OccHealth_Abrams.pdf journal of public health policy • vol. 22, no. 1, 2001. This is clipped from the 1936 film The Work of the Public Health Service by the U.S. Public Health Service. This 52 minute film is available for downloading at the Internet Archive.
Views: 1233 markdcatlin
The Most Dangerous Woman in America - PBS Nova Documentary - Closed Captions
 
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Typhoid Marry Documentary - The Most Dangerous Woman In America - National TV Mary Mallon (September 23, 1869-- Nov 11, 1938), better known as . Typhoid Mary. For episodes of Dark Matters, visit The real Typhoid Mary was an Irish immigrant who worked as a cook in . Mother Jones and the struggle against child labor in America. Many of the photos come from Mr. Louis Hine, hired by the Committee On Child Labor to document . Mother Jones: Labor organizer, hellraiser, the Miners Angel, forgotten icon of the labor movement.
Views: 224 r1KmAN
Money as a Democratic Medium |  The Color of Money: Banking and Racial Inequality (with Slides)
 
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In the American tradition, commercial banking claimed public support in exchange for delivering public services. It has become increasingly clear that those services are both failing the poor and distributing resources, including access, authority, profits, and credit, along lines of race.
Views: 841 Harvard Law School
Ralph Chaplin, Bars And Shadows, The Prison Poems - Blood And Wine
 
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Ralph Hosea Chaplin (1887–1961) was an American writer, artist and labor activist. At the age of seven, he saw a worker shot dead during the Pullman Strike in Chicago, Illinois. He had moved with his family from Ames, Kansas to Chicago in 1893. During a time in Mexico he was influenced by hearing of the execution squads established by Porfirio Díaz, and became a supporter of Emiliano Zapata. On his return, he began work in various union positions, most of which were poorly paid. Some of Chaplin's early artwork was done for the International Socialist Review and other Charles H. Kerr publications. Chaplin's IWW membership booklet For two years Chaplin worked in the strike committee with Mother Jones for the bloody Kanawha County, West Virginia strike of coal miners in 1912-13. These influences led him to write a number of labor oriented poems, one of which became the words for the oft-sung union anthem, "Solidarity Forever". Chaplin then became active in the Industrial Workers of the World (the IWW, or "Wobblies") and became editor of its eastern U.S. publication Solidarity. In 1917 Chaplin and some 100 other Wobblies were rounded up, convicted, and jailed under the Espionage Act of 1917 for conspiring to hinder the draft and encourage desertion. He wrote Bars And Shadows: The Prison Poems while serving four years of a 20-year sentence. The black cat of the Industrial Workers of the World, also adopted as a symbol by anarcho-syndicalists Although he continued to work for labor rights after his release from prison, Chaplin was very disillusioned by the aftermath of the Russian Revolution and the evolution of the Soviet state and international communism, particularly its involvement in American politics and unions in 1920-1948, as he details in his autobiography, Wobbly. However, he was also not pleased by the course of New Deal liberalism. Chaplin maintained his involvement with the IWW, serving in Chicago as editor of its newspaper, the Industrial Worker, from 1932 to 1936. He became active in the cause of preventing Communist infiltration in American unions. Eventually Chaplin settled in Tacoma, Washington, where he edited the local labor publication. From 1949 until his death he was curator of manuscripts for the Washington State Historical Society. He is credited with designing the now widely used anarcho-syndicalist image, the black cat. As its stance indicates, the cat is meant to suggest wildcat strikes and radical unionism. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 41 A Room With A View
First Church Somerville's Gospel Choir, God's Good
 
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On October 21, 2012 First Church Somerville's Gospel Choir performed God's Good during the worship service. The gospel choir is accompanied by First Church Somerville's own Project Soul. First Church Somerville is an Open and Affirming UCC Church based in the Davis Square Area of Somerville, MA. http://www.FirstChurchSomerville.org
Thorium.
 
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http://ThoriumRemix.com/ Thorium is an abundant material which can be transformed into massive quantities of energy. To do so efficiently requires a very different nuclear reactor than the kind we use today- Not one that uses solid fuel rods, but a reactor in which the fuel is kept in a liquid state. Not one that uses pressurized water as a coolant, but a reactor that uses chemically stable molten salts. Such a reactor is called a "Molten Salt Reactor". Many different configurations are possible. Some of these configurations can harness Thorium very efficiently. This video explores the attributes of Molten Salt Reactors. Why are they compelling? And why do many people (including myself) see them as the only economical way of fully harnessing ALL our nuclear fuels... including Thorium. This video has been under development since 2012. I hope it conveys to you why I personally find Molten Salt Reactors so compelling, as do the many volunteers and supporters who helped create it. Much of the footage was shot by volunteers. All music was created by: http://kilowattsmusic.com To support this project, please visit: https://patreon.com/thorium Entities pursuing Molten Salt Reactors are... Flibe Energy - http://flibe-energy.com/ Terrestrial Energy - http://terrestrialenergy.com/ Moltex Energy - http://www.moltexenergy.com/ ThorCon Power - http://thorconpower.com/ Transatomic - http://www.transatomicpower.com/ Seaborg - http://seaborg.co/ Copenhagen Atomics - http://www.copenhagenatomics.com/ TerraPower - http://terrapower.com/ Bhabha Atomic Research Centre - http://www.barc.gov.in/ Chinese Academy of Sciences - http://english.cas.cn/ Regular Thorium conferences are organized by: http://thoriumenergyalliance.com/ http://thoriumenergyworld.com/ Table of Contents 0:00:00 Space 0:17:29 Constraints 0:28:22 Coolants 0:40:15 MSRE 0:48:54 Earth 0:59:46 Thorium 1:22:03 LFTR 1:36:13 Revolution 1:44:58 Forward 1:58:11 ROEI 2:05:41 Beginning 2:08:36 History 2:38:59 Dowtherm 2:47:57 Salt 2:51:44 Pebbles 3:06:07 India 3:18:44 Caldicott 3:35:55 Fission 3:56:22 Spectrum 4:04:25 Chemistry 4:12:51 Turbine 4:22:27 Waste 4:40:15 Decommission 4:54:39 Candlelight 5:13:06 Facts 5:26:08 Future 5:55:39 Pitches 5:56:17 Terrestrial 6:08:33 ThorCon 6:11:45 Flibe 6:20:51 End 6:25:53 Credits Some of this footage is remixed from non-MSR related sources, to help explain the importance of energy for both space exploration and everyday life here on Earth. Most prominently... Pandora's Promise - https://youtu.be/bDw3ET3zqxk Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson - https://youtu.be/Pun76NZMjCk Dr. Robert Zubrin - https://youtu.be/EKQSijn9FBs Mars Underground - https://youtu.be/tcTZvNLL0-w Andy Weir & Adam Savage - https://youtu.be/5SemyzKgaUU Periodic Table Videos - https://youtube.com/channel/UCtESv1e7ntJaLJYKIO1FoYw
Views: 145426 gordonmcdowell
Silicosis Death / Maut Ka Dawat (Etv broadcast the story in March 2009)
 
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In India, there are about 3 million workers formally employed in the formal economy with potential exposure to silica dust. Further, approximately 8.5 million more work in construction and some more exposed to silica dust in such a sectors called as unorganised/ informal economy which are not yet defined by the government based on specific policy that could differentiate formal/organised and informal/unorganised sectors. Thousands of these workers develop silicosis every year and die directly from it, or from secondary causes such as TB or lung cancer. However, relatively few of these deaths are recorded as being caused by silicosis or as being work-related in national statistics According to International Labor Organization's (ILO) Prevention of Occupational Diseases report that said 2.02 million--of the 2.34 million--died "from wide range of work-related diseases. 6,300 work-related death happen everyday and 5,500 are brought by work-related diseases while around 160 million cases of non-fatal work-related diseases occur annually. In India, the ILO said, about "10 million workers employed in mining, construction and various industries are exposed to silica dusts" and "some studies show that silicosis prevalence rates are 54.6 percent among slate pencil workers and 35.2 percent among stonecutters, while the coal-worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) prevalence rate is 18.8 percent." The ILO/WHO Joint Committee on Occupational Health launched in 1995 a Global Programme on the Elimination of Silicosis from the world by 2030. The objective of this Task Force is to further develop and implement this programme, to encourage every country to develop its own national silicosis elimination programme, and to provide a knowledge base for countries that wish to launch a national programme. Prevention of pneumoconiosis other than silicosis may be included as a part of the programmes at the regional and country levels, because occupational exposures to different kinds of dusts are widespread and the prevention and control activities for different forms of pneumoconiosis are to some extent related. But in India there is no such Occupational Disease Detection Centres/Units in majority of government and ESI hospitals. IMF chief Christine Lagarde today said pollution from coal generation plants causes about 70,000 premature deaths every year in India. Indian coal power plants kill 120,000 people a year, says Greenpeace Jharkhand is a mineral bearing State in India. History of mining and processing of metallic and non-metallic minerals in Jharkhand is more than 200 years old. More than 16000 dust generating units that include coal, copper, iron, uranium, bauxite, quartz, granite, and several thousand related industries and construction sites are currently operational. Nearly 55-60 Ramming Mass (Quartz Grinding) units, more than 15,000 stone crushers, 192 iron ore crushers, 40 sponge iron units which are in operation without any regulatory mechanism are identified as most hazardous units of Jharkhand. Two Ramming Mass units of Musaboni Block have claimed lives of 38 workers within 5-to 10 years, 16 cases are found confirmed silicosis who are alive and remaining 136 silica dust affected workers who have been suffering from lung ailment who need medical surveillances treatments and life care supports for increasing the expectancies of their lives. Considering the above facts and the older information available in different sources in public domain the conservative estimate is around 25-30 lakh workers are exposed to silicosis and other occupational lung diseases in Jharkhand. The children and women of this affected workers are worst victims because early cessation from their job and premature death put them in vulnerable situation that need to be addressed implementing legal provisions of social security for the affected workers and their family members.
Views: 679 ROSHNIPATH
Queensboro Bridge narrowly avoided being blown up in 1907 union terror campaign
 
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At Christmas time in 1907, a rogue dynamiter known by the nom de boom George O'Donnell sat in a rented room overlooking the East River and studied the construction of the new bridge to Long Island City. After four years of labor, the $20 million span that became the Queensboro Bridge was nearly finished. And the scoundrel O'Donnell aimed to bring it down. It was a $2,500 hit for a patron known for erections, not demolitions: the International Association of Bridge and Structural Ironworkers. The Queensboro job was to be a big bang in a largely forgotten terror campaign a century ago by union ironworkers against the open shop movement. ‘Monster’ brutally raped and killed women for over a decade From 1905 to 1911, 86 structures — many of them bridges, buildings and viaducts built with non-union labor — were damaged in a plot by an inner ring snidely dubbed the "entertainment committee" at the ironworkers international headquarters in Indianapolis. Blasts thundered in more than a dozen cities hitting, among others, a courthouse in Omaha, the Grand Opera House in Boston, and structures in Cleveland, New Orleans, Salt Lake City and New Jersey. Kansas City saw five explosions in three years. Union membership was booming, increasing to nearly 2 million from 1897 to 1904. This nettled Big Business. Crooked NYC bookie drove LaGuardia crazy during 30-year career In 1903, David McLean Parry of the National Association of Manufacturers declared that unions followed "the law of the savages." American Industries, a trade magazine, griped that unions regarded capitalists with "bitter hostility." It said, "The constant opposition of the labor union leaders to rational plans. . . has proven a continual source of amazement and chagrin to all fair-minded employers of union labor." As many as 50 trades had a role in building colossal structures like the Queensboro. Powerful forces in the construction world — U.S. Steel, the American Bridge Co. and the National Erectors' Association — were determined to keep such jobs open to non-unionists. This put them at odds with ironworkers. Ex-teacher gunned down 8 in Fla. in 1982, offered hint of future These cowboys of the skies were a different breed, plying a trade that the U.S. Bureau of Labor described at the time as "one of the most, if not the most, hazardous industrial operation." The ironworker on-the-job mortality rate was more than double that of coal miners. "They work far up on dizzying structures," a federal commission noted in 1914. "They creep to and fro on narrow iron beams so far up in the air that the people down below look like little ants . . . They must become accustomed to going up high and not falling off." Just one in four of the 50,000 American ironworkers were unionized in 1905, when the international ordered a strike, seeking official recognition from Big Business. The dynamiting of open shop jobsites commenced within weeks. Killer axman spares jazz lovers in New Orleans sl
Views: 9 lauaoq Tagsia
Ludlow Massacre // Colorado 2009 // Sam Phillips Interview With Film Makers
 
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Was on Tour With The Band Hobo Monk..and as we were driving We ran into Ludlow ..Said a Prayer and this film Makers ask to interview me..then i found out later that it was to become a historic landmark the next day. Funny How The Universe works sometimes........... The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado on April 20, 1914. The massacre resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 25 people; sources vary but all sources include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. The deaths occurred after a daylong fight between militia and camp guards against striking workers. Ludlow was the deadliest single incident in the southern Colorado Coal Strike, lasting from September 1913 through December 1914. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) against coal mining companies in Colorado. The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company (CF&I), the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company (RMF), and the Victor-American Fuel Company (VAF). In retaliation for Ludlow, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg.[1] The entire strike would cost between 69 and 199 lives. Thomas Franklin Andrews described it as the "deadliest strike in the history of the United States".[2] The Ludlow Massacre was a watershed moment in American labor relations. Historian Howard Zinn described the Ludlow Massacre as "the culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history".[3] Congress responded to public outcry by directing the House Committee on Mines and Mining to investigate the incident.[4] Its report, published in 1915, was influential in promoting child labor laws and an eight-hour work day. The Ludlow site, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Trinidad, Colorado, is now a ghost town. The massacre site is owned by the UMWA, which erected a granite monument in memory of the miners and their families who died that day.[5] The Ludlow Tent Colony Site was designated a National Historic Landmark on January 16, 2009, and dedicated on June 28, 2009.[5] Modern archeological investigation largely supports the strikers' reports of the event.[
Views: 1081 Sam Phillips
Japan′s wartime industrial sites added to UNESCO heritage list 

日세계유산 유네스코 등재
 
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Following months of negotiations, Korea and Japan have reached an agreement on Tokyo′s bid to list some of its wartime industrial facilities as UNESCO world heritage sites. While Tokyo does have some obligations to meet,... there are concerns over Japan′s sincerity regarding the issue. Hwang Sung-hee tells us more. The World Heritage Committee listed Tokyo′s wartime industrial facilities as UNESCO sites at its 39th session in Bonn, Germany, on Sunday. The listing which follows months of negotiations between Korea and Japan comes with a set of preconditions. ″Japan is prepared to take measures that allow an understanding that there were a large number of Koreans and others who were brought against their will and forced to work under harsh conditions in the 1940s at some of the sites.″ Japan′s 23 industrial sites include seven coal mines and shipyards where nearly 60-thousand Koreans were forced into labor in the 1940s, during its colonial rule of Korea. Tokyo had initially marked them as being operational from 1850 to 1910. Japan also vowed to ensure the victims are remembered by establishing information centers at each site. Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se welcomed the outcome, as it marks the first time that Tokyo has publicly acknowledged such cases of forced labor. ″We are pleased that Japan′s wartime industrial facilities were listed as World Heritage sites in the form that takes account of our legitimate concerns.″ But tensions remain with Japan giving an ambiguous translation of its statement for its domestic audience. ″The expression ′forced to work′ does not mean forced labor.″ An official at Seoul′s foreign ministry dismissed concerns, saying the English version of the statement has been officially adopted by the World Heritage Committee. He added that Japan must also follow up by submitting a progress report by the end of 2017, which will be reviewed by the World Heritage Committee the following year. If Japan′s progress is deemed unsatisfactory, the sites could be removed from the UNESCO list. Hwang Sung-hee, Arirang News.
Views: 112 ARIRANG NEWS
Jay: A Rockefeller's Journey
 
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Why would the heir to one of the nation’s largest family fortunes would come to one of the poorest states in the nation - and stay? This documentary traces the 50-year public service career of John D. Rockefeller IV, while capturing much of the political history of West Virginia, his adopted home.
Military Spending | January 30, 2019 Act 2 | Full Frontal on TBS
 
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The U.S. Military's budget is more than almost every other department combined which is why it is in ship shape – the ship being one of the disintegrating ships currently in our fleet. Watch Full Frontal with Samantha Bee all new Wednesdays at 10:30/ 9:30c on TBS! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/fullfrontalsamb?sub_confirmation=1 Follow Full Frontal with Samantha Bee: Twitter: https://twitter.com/FullFrontalSamB Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fullfrontalsamb/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fullfrontalsamb/ Medium: https://medium.com/@fullfrontalsamb/ SamBee.com #SamanthaBee #FullFrontalSamB
PBS NewsHour full episode April 11, 2019
 
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Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 79404 PBS NewsHour
Strangers in Their Own Land: Challenges Climbing the Empathy Wall
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:30 - Introduction by Dylan Riley 6:01 - Main Speaker - Arlie Hochschild 45:01 - Audience questions Arlie Hochschild describes her journey from Berkeley, her own liberal cultural enclave, to Louisiana, a conservative one. She explores her choice of research site, her effort to remove her own political alarm system, and during five years of research, to climb over what she calls an “empathy wall.” She focuses on her concept of the “deep story” – a version of which underlies all political belief, she argues, and will end with the possibilities of finding common ground across the political divide. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Show ID: 32997]
Clean Up Coal Ash
 
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https://secure.earthjustice.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1747 Click above to take action to prevent the coal industry and their allies in Congress from weakening or eliminating the coal ash safeguards that Americans fought so hard for.
Views: 2482 Earthjustice
America in World War I: Crash Course US History #30
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about American involvement in World War I, which at the time was called the Great War. They didn't know there was going to be a second one, though they probably should have guessed, 'cause this one didn't wrap up very neatly. So, the United States stayed out of World War I at first, because Americans were in an isolationist mood in the early 20th century. That didn't last though, as the affronts piled up and drew the US into the war. Spoiler alert: the Lusitania was sunk two years before we joined the war, so that wasn't the sole cause for our jumping in. It was part of it though, as was the Zimmerman telegram, unrestricted submarine warfare, and our affinity for the Brits. You'll learn the war's effects on the home front, some of Woodrow Wilson's XIV Points, and just how the war ended up expanding the power of the government in Americans' lives. Subbable message!!!: Jared Richardson says, "All true love is beautiful. Support your LGBT community." Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The complex secret alliances of Europe led to World War I: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/a-mad-dash-to-disaster-the-first-world-war It took several years before Americans joined the war: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/to-the-front-lines-america-in-world-war-i After the war, President Woodrow Wilson wanted to prevent a future World War, and promoted creating a League of Nations, established following the Treaty of Versailles: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-treaty-of-versailles-and-the-league-of-nations Follow Us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @br8ybrunch
Views: 2754438 CrashCourse
Fall 2018 CNR Albright Lecture w/SPH Speaker Series: Van Jones
 
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Van Jones, Political Commentator, CNN; President and Founder, Dream Corps talk on Environmental Justice: What can we do about the disproportionate impact of climate change on low-income communities? Van Jones is president and founder of the nonprofit, Dream Corps, a social justice accelerator that backs initiatives that close prison doors and open doors of opportunity for all. Jones has led a number of other justice enterprises, including The Ella Baker Center for Human Rights and Color of Change. A Yale-educated attorney, Van has written three New York Times Bestsellers: The Green Collar Economy, the definitive book on green jobs; Rebuild the Dream, a roadmap for progressives; and most recently, Beyond the Messy Truth: How We Came apart, How We Come Together. In 2009, Van worked as the green jobs advisor to the Obama White House. Host of The Van Jones Show, he is a CNN correspondent and regular guest on political talk shows. This talk is the UC Berkeley College of Natural Resources Horace M. Albright Lecture in Conservation and also part of the UC Berkeley School of Public Health’s 75th Anniversary Speaker Series.
Views: 847 UC Berkeley Events
Below the Line – Griffith University's independent analysis of the 2019 Australian Federal Election
 
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In this second episode of Below the Line, Griffith University political scientists take a look at the Senate race, the strategies and techniques of the campaign, and discusses the seats of Bonner, Capricornia and Longman.
Views: 338 Griffith University
The Hope of America’s Possibility, with Rev. William J. Barber II | #OBConf2019
 
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Rev. William J. Barber, II, gave a rousing and profound keynote about the work to build a broad-based grassroots movement that can be strong and sustainable enough to confront systemic racism, poverty, environmental devastation, the war economy, and the distorted moral narrative of religious nationalism in America today. -- William J. Barber, II is a pastor and social justice advocate building a broad-based grassroots movement, grounded in the moral tenets of faith-based communities and the constitution. As pastor of Greenleaf Christian Church in Goldsboro, North Carolina (since 1993) and president of the North Carolina conference of the NAACP (2005–2017), Barber approaches social justice through the lens of the ethical and moral treatment of people as laid out in the Christian Bible, the Reconstruction and civil rights movements of the South, and the United States Constitution. He is effective at building unusually inclusive fusion coalitions that are multiracial and interfaith, reaching across race, gender, age, and class lines, and dedicated to addressing poverty, inequality, and systemic racism. When his work to expand voting rights, health care, living wages, immigrant rights, public education and LGBTQ rights was thwarted by extremist state lawmakers in North Carolina, Barber began a series of "Moral Monday" rallies outside of the statehouse in Raleigh to protest laws that suppressed voter turnout, cut funding for public education and healthcare, and further disenfranchised poor white, black, First Nations, and LGBTQ communities. The Moral Mondays rallies and associated nonviolent acts of civil disobedience grew to involve tens of thousands of participants across North Carolina and spread to states across the South. The movement waged successful legal challenges to voter suppression and racial gerrymandering, winning twice at the Supreme Court. Barber founded Repairers of the Breach, a leadership development organization, in 2014 to expand and build a national movement rooted in moral analysis, moral articulation, and moral action. In 2016 he led a moral revival tour that covered 26 states and attracted thousands. In 2017, he and colleagues launched a revival of the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign that was spearheaded by Dr Martin Lither King, Jr and many others. Beginning with an audit of systemic racism, poverty, ecological devastation, and the war economy in the United States since 1968, the campaign has been recast for the twenty-first century, building state and local, non-partisan fusing movements committed to shifting the moral narrative, building power, and challenging laws and policies that hurt the poor and threaten our democracy. William Barber received a B.A. (1985) from North Carolina Central University, an M.Div. (1989) from Duke University, and a D.Min. (2003) from Drew University. He has also received seven Honorary Doctorates. From 2006 to 2017, Barber was president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP and has been a member of the national board of the NAACP since 2005. He is a contributing op-ed writer for The New York Times, CNN, MSNBC and the Washington Post. Barber is also a 2018 MacArthur Fellow, 2018 Tar Heel of the Year, an Auburn Seminary Senior Fellow and holds the Visiting Social Justice Chair at St. John’s University. For a transcript visit: https://www.rev.com/transcript-editor/shared/JTQ6GR3rl4n97hugTRAze_Q5ftIuosUHDacpdkQ5Nx_eOTEFsaCCDcr36TloM_oogaZcD4153_VDKuV6Co75SjPZwec?loadFrom=SharedLink
Watch President Trump's full remarks on new NAFTA agreement, USMCA
 
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President Trump is holding a press conference in the Rose Garden on details of a new trade agreement reached between the United States, Mexico and Canada on Monday. The United States and Canada announced late Sunday evening that a deal was reached for Canada to stay in the North American trade pact with the United States and Mexico. The announcement was made an hour before a White House-imposed deadline of midnight on Sept 30. In a joint statement, U.S.Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said the accord would be renamed the USMCA (United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement). For live updates: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-holds-press-conference-on-new-nafta-plan-live-updates/ -- Subscribe to the CBS News Channel HERE: http://youtube.com/cbsnews Watch CBSN live HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7 Follow CBS News on Instagram HERE: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/ Like CBS News on Facebook HERE: http://facebook.com/cbsnews Follow CBS News on Twitter HERE: http://twitter.com/cbsnews Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream CBSN and local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites like Star Trek Discovery anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B --- CBSN is the first digital streaming news network that will allow Internet-connected consumers to watch live, anchored news coverage on their connected TV and other devices. At launch, the network is available 24/7 and makes all of the resources of CBS News available directly on digital platforms with live, anchored coverage 15 hours each weekday. CBSN. Always On.
Views: 71643 CBS News
SBCC Board of Trustees 2/14/2019
 
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Be advised: video includes explicit language
Views: 696 SBCCBoardofTrustees
Forgotten Leaders. Episode 7. Lavrentiy Beria. Part 1. Documentary. English Subtitles. StarMediaEN
 
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https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwGzY25TNHPDWyg0REfU7gHqUk40elC1_ All Episodes of "Forgotten Leaders" The project provisionally titled “Forgotten Leaders” is a series of seven films, each featuring an individual from the leaders of the Soviet state in power during the time period from 1920 to 1953. Each episode is a filmed portrait depicting the story of life, political and public activities of its hero. The heroes of “The Forgotten Leaders” are individuals ambiguous from the perspective of the Russian and world’s history and odious and often sharply negative in the eyes of public consciousness. Unfortunately, when labeling, we often forget that “each individual is a tangle of contradictions” and that “history is written by the victors”. Seven men. Seven lives. One era. What was behind their decisions and at what was the price they paid for their deeds? Type: historical reenactment Genre: docudrama Year of production: 2016 Number of episodes: 8 Directed by: Pavel Sergatskov Written by: Aleksandr Kolpakydy, Egor Vasilyev, Aleksandr Lukyanov, Vasiliy Shevtsov, Inna Nechaykyna Production designer: Aleksandr Khilyarevskiy Director of photography: Aleksandr Kiper Music by: Boris Kukoba Producers: Valeriy Babich , Vlad Ryashin Cast: Farid Takhiev, Roman Vusotskiy, Sergey Tishin, Aleksandr Suvorov, Anton Morozov, Aleksey Ustinov, Adam Bulkhuchev https://youtu.be/WLGUWdbtVS4 Forgotten Leaders. Episode 7. Lavrentiy Beria. Part 1. Documentary. StarMediaEN Watch movies and TV series for free in high quality. Explore a great collection of documentaries. The best Russian movies and TV series, melodramas, war movies, military TV shows, new Russian films, top documentary films and full movies with english subtitles. With the help of these free online Russian movies you will learn Russian easily. Subscribe for high quality movies and series on our channel. Enjoy Watching! #StarMediaEN
Views: 11499 StarMediaEN
Simon Pegg: What does coal have to do with hunger? | Oxfam GB
 
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Coal pollution is the single biggest driver of climate change on the planet. Sign the petition today :http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coal Let’s tell David Cameron to phase out coal. It's causing more and more extreme weather and pushing the world's poorest people into poverty and hunger. If we keep burning fossil fuels at the rate we are now, climate change could push 50 million people into hunger by 2050. It's not too late to stop climate change, find out more on "What does coal have to do with hunger?" http://po.st/YJxPU9
Views: 14172 Oxfam GB
Full 2019 Spitzenkandidaten debate at the European Parliament
 
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The six lead candidates of the main political parties laid out their visions of Europe on Wednesday evening (15 May), clashing over jobs and climate change in their last televised debate before the EU elections.
Views: 220 EURACTIV
History: UKRAINE
 
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Crimea: Cossacks helped Russia get Crimea from Turkey 39:43 Donbas (Eastern Ukraine) 56:55 Crimea turned over to Ukraine 2:16:28 Russia 12:46 / 31:16 UKRAINE - THE BIRTH OF A NATION (2008) / A Jerzy Hoffman Film 1:34 Kyiv (401 - 500) 2:16 Byzantium (330–1453) 2:45 Princess Olga (890 - 969) adopted Christianity 3:28 Chersonesus in Crimea 4:06 Volodymyr the Great (958 - 1015) 4:29 Prince Yaroslav the Wise (978 - 1054) 4:39 Saint Sophia's Cathedral (1100) 5:31 Anna the Queen of France (1030 – 1075) 6:41 Volodymyr II Monomakh (1053-1125) 7:20 Yuri Dolgorukiy (1099 - 1157) 7:26 Moscow 7:37 The Mongols 10:16 The Principality of Galicia–Volhynia or Kingdom of Rus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yV5hNTQ6IU 10:49 Lviv 12:37 Ivan III of Russia (1440-1505) 12:46 The myth about Russia 13:07 Crimea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1xFdzuZhBM 13:53 Roxolana (1502 – 1558) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOtamB4m95o&t=81s 15:20 serfdom (Polish oppression) 15:40 printing press 17:14 Zaporizhian Sich 18:33 Ukraine replaces the name Rus 18:40 cossack 20:15 Brest Union 20:18 The uniates 21:08 Hetman Sagaidachny (1570 - 1622) 23:05 Orthodoxy 23:28 Yarema Vyshnevetsky (1612 – 1651) 23:31 Catholicism 24:54 Bohdan Khmelnytsky (1595 – 1657) 30:04 The Pereyaslav Council -------------------------------------------------1654 34:39 Ivan Mazepa (1639 - 1709) 37:06 The Battle of Poltava on 27 June 1709 40:11 Zaporizhian Sich (1552-1709) 40:27 Solovki French Revolution--------------------------------------------------------------------- 1789 47:03 Dumy - historical ballads 48:18 Greek Catholic Church banned 48:49 Kyiv University (1833) 49:48 The Order of Basilian Fathers 50:55 Taras Shevchenko (1814 - 1861) (age 47) 54:57 Blue and yellow banner 55:45 The Cyril and Methodius Brotherhood 56:32 national liberation movement 56:55 Crimean War ----------------------------------------------------- 1853 to 1856 57:07 Alexander II (1818 - 1881) abolished serfdom 57:26 city of Donetsk (1868) 58:56 "Green wedge" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hECJ3qgHZrw 59:23 Volodymyr Antonovych (1834 - 1908) 59:28 Mykhailo Drahomanov (1841-1895 ) 1:00:42 Lesya Ukrainka (1871 - 1913) (aged 42) 1:02:13 The Shevchenko Scientific Society (1873 ) 1:11:03 Mykhailo Hrushevsky 1:03:27 Ivan Franko (1856 - 1916) 1:04:22 "History of Ukraine-Ruthenia" 1:04:49 Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky (1865 - 1944) 1:45:42 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KeA2cGo6Y0 1:06:31 World War I------------------------------------------------------------------1914 1:07:32 Dmitro Dontsov (1883 - 1973) 1:07:57 (1914) Russian occupation 1:11:24 Symon Petliura 1:11:24 West Ukrainian People's Republic 1:19:27 Ukrainian Galician Army 1:23:30 Nestor Makhno 1:30:48 The Russian famine ----------------------------------------------------1921 1:41:21 Ukr National Democratic Alliance, (UNDO) 1:42:20 Ukr Sich Riflemen 1:42:43 (UVO) Ukr Military Organization 1:42:51 Yevhen Konovalets 1:43:10 Dmytro Dontsov 1:44:01 The Organization of Ukr Nationalists (OUN) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtHsxIUAIaI 1:44:52 (1933) Stepan Bandera head of OUN https://youtu.be/ToiXSo6fCWI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1kOprGoA7U&t=2245s 1:47:07 Avgustyn Voloshyn 1:47:33 Melnyk's and Bandera's https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVi91LgAAeI 1:39:06 collectivization (1939) 1:38:55 *** 𝐌𝐈𝐒𝐒𝐈𝐍𝐆 𝐏𝐀𝐑𝐓: https://youtu.be/s8AASWZvHe0?t=11m29s !!! 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐥 1:39:33 World War II ----------------------------------------------------------------(1939 - 1945) 1:51:24 The Nachtigall Battalion (Nightingale) 1:51:43 Independent Ukr State 1:44:50 Stepan Bandera (1909 – 1959) -----------------------------------1933 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvs_Co3Hi-0 Between Hitler & Stalin: Ukraine in World War II https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fx05VezU2UI&index=11&list=FL99mdFIyIske2tVF98ycmvg Wehrmacht Saves Innocent Civilians In Ukraine 1941 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWvvOAzJBxY&feature=youtu.be 1:53:42 Babi Yar 1:55:40 partisan warfare 1:44:01 Organization of Ukr Nationalists (OUN) 1:57:42 Roman Shukhevych https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NENah9oEiek 1:58:37 Volyn 1:58:57 UPA - Ukrainian Insurgent Army 2:00:04 ethnic cleansing (1943) 2:02:32 SS Galicia Division 2:02:33 Banderavists (Bandera) split of OUN (former UVO) 1:47:26 2:02:25 Melnykovites (Melnyk) 2:02:57 SS Galicia crushed by the Red Army 2:04:51 Nikita Khrushchev 2:05:21 Joseph Stalin 1:39:56 RUSYN replaced the term Ukrainian 2:06:14 Gulag 2:06:31 Yalta 2:10:30 Operation Vistula (Polish: Akcja "Wisła") https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Vistula 2:12:00 The Greek Catholic Church abolishment 2:12:21 Josyf Slipyj (1893 - 1984) 1:49:25 annexation of the Western Ukraine 2:16:33 turning Crimea over to Ukraine 2:18:25 Thaw (early 1950s to the early 1960s) 2:30:09 (April 26 1986) - Chornobyl disaster 2:35:30 Rukh - Movement 2:37:29 (1991) Declaration of Sovereignty of Ukraine 1:13:48 The Ukr People's Republic of 1918 - 1920 2:50:29 The Orange Revolution (2004)
Views: 41425 kasia prada
Canada's Toxic Chemical Valley (Full Length)
 
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The first thing you notice about Sarnia, Ontario, is the smell: a potent mix of gasoline, melting asphalt, and the occasional trace of rotten egg. Shortly after my arrival I already felt unpleasantly high and dizzy, like I wasn't getting enough air. Maybe this had something to do with the bouquet of smokestacks in the southern part of town that, all day every day, belch fumes and orange flares like something out of a Blade Runner-esque dystopia. Sarnia is home to more than 60 refineries and chemical plants that produce gasoline, synthetic rubbers, and other materials that the world's industries require to create the commercial products we know and love. The city's most prominent and profitable attraction is an area about the size of 100 city blocks known as the Chemical Valley, where 40 percent of Canada's chemical industry can be found packed together like a noxious megalopolis. According to a 2011 report by the World Health Organization, Sarnia's air is the most polluted air in Canada. There are more toxic air pollutants billowing out of smokestacks here than in all of the provinces of New Brunswick or Manitoba. Read the full article on VICE here: http://bit.ly/Chemical-Valley Check out the Best of VICE here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Best-Of Subscribe to VICE here! http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
Views: 322685 VICE
The World at War [1931-1941], 1942
 
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Help us caption and translate this video on Amara.org: http://amara.org/en/videos/viPVSBwrBbQt/info/the-world-at-war-1931-1941-1942/ Creator(s): Office for Emergency Management. Office of War Information. Overseas Operations Branch. New York Office. News and Features Bureau. (12/17/1942 - 09/15/1945) (Most Recent) Series : Propaganda, Information, and Documentary Motion Pictures, compiled ca. 1942 - 1945, documenting the period 1918 - 1945 Record Group 208: Records of the Office of War Information, 1926 - 1951 Production Date: 1942 General Note(s): Credits: Producer and writer, Samuel Spewack; narrator, Paul Stewart; editor, Gene Milford. Contributor: Producer, Office of War Information. Distributed by the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry. Use Restriction(s): Undetermined Scope & Content: Reel 1, shows the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the resultant damage. Pres. Roosevelt delivers his war message to Congress. Presents sentiments prior to the war: Wendell Willkie speaks for one world; German Bundists meet in Madison Square Garden; laborers fight at various strikes. Japanese troops invade Manchuria and China. Shows Ambassador Shigemitsu. Reel 2 shows a League of Nations meeting and, later, Japan's delegates leaving after resigning. Japanese troops enter Shanghai. Shows fighting in China and a Japanese air raid. Shows peaceful Japanese scenes and ceremonies at a baseball game. Hirohito reviews troops. Mussolini addresses a throng; Italy invades Ethiopia; Haile Selassi rallies his people. An Italian representative speaks in Japan. Germany marches into Austria (Mar. 1938). Reel 3 shows fighting and destruction during the Spanish Civil War. Daladier, Chamberlain, Mussolini, and Hitler sign the Munich Pact. German troops are greeted in the Sudeten; troops march into Prague and invade Albania. Hitler, addressing the Reichstag, ridicules Roosevelt's appeal for peace. Hitler confers with Goring, and von Ribbentrop meets with Russian diplomats to negotiate the Moscow Pact. Contrasts Poland's military power with that of Germany, showing German pictures of aerial attacks. Reel 4 shows war-torn Poland: Warsaw is bombed, evacuated, and burned. Hitler reviews his troops. French troops man the Maginot Line. Norway, Denmark, Holland, and Belgium are invaded. German films show the power of the army: big guns, mechanized equipment, paratroops, etc. Dutch refugees clog roads; Rotterdam burns. Reel 5 shows scenes of the Belgium campaign and of the evacuation of Allied troops at Dunkirk. Reel 6 shows scenes of the French campaign, including the evacuation of children from Paris and the formal surrender. Britain is attacked: ships are sunk; London, Plymouth, and Coventry suffer bombings; Churchill rallies his people; Malta is bombed; troops fight in Egypt. HaileSelassi is restored. Reel 7 shows Italian prisoners in Libya. Shows activities in Russia: Stalin confers with citizens, wheat is harvested, factories produce, soldiers and citizens gear to war. Shows Gen. MacArthur in the Philippines and in Australia. Pres. Roosevelt signs the Lend-Lease Act, U.S. industry turns out materiel of war, and military developments are increased in a total war campaign. Contact(s): National Archives at College Park - Motion Pictures (RD-DC-M), National Archives at College Park 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001 Phone: 301-837-3540, Fax: 301-837-3620, Email: [email protected] National Archives Identifier: 38726 Local Identifier: 208.145 http://research.archives.gov/description/38726
Views: 69480 US National Archives