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[Legislative Council] 2R - Coal Industry Amendment Bill 2018
 
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1 May 2018 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament 2nd Reading Speech - Coal Industry Amendment Bill 2018 FULL TRANSCRIPT AT http://adamsearle.org/in-the-legislative-council/debate-on-bills/coal-industry-amendment-bill-2018/ The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 15:41 ): I lead for the Labor Opposition in debate on the Coal Industry Amendment Bill 2018. I am pleased to inform the House that we will be supporting the legislation. The Coal Industry Act provides for approved companies to carry out statutory functions under the legislation, including delivering workers compensation insurance, health surveillance, occupational health and rehabilitation services, the collection of statistics, monitoring of dust and other airborne contaminants, as well as supplying mines rescue emergency services and training to the New South Wales coal industry. The companies approved to conduct these functions are Coal Services and its subsidiaries, Coal Mines Insurance and Mines Rescue. The companies are jointly owned by the NSW Minerals Council and the Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union. The approved companies together provide a comprehensive health and safety scheme for the coalmining industry in New South Wales under arrangements that are unique in Australia and the world. The current scheme was a legacy of the Carr Labor Government. To achieve the objectives of the legislation the approved company, Coal Mines Insurance, exercises a workers compensation insurance monopoly over employers in the coal industry. Coal Services also provides a specialist health and safety scheme for the New South Wales coal industry with very robust controls and monitoring, as the Minister outlined in his second reading speech. This enables employers who insure through the approved company to access health monitoring for their workers free of any additional charge. This monitoring assists mine operators to identify high-risk areas and activities and to drive further improvements in workplace health and safety in the coalmines. Importantly, these arrangements together have helped to effectively eliminate many conditions and illnesses that were for decades a feature of coalmining, not only in this State but also in other jurisdictions. For example, black lung disease, or pneumoconiosis as it is correctly known, has effectively been eliminated in this State. There have been some instances of it but it is much better than in other jurisdictions and this is as a result of the health screening function provided under this regime. The work of these important services is met not by the State budget but by funds generated through workers compensation premiums paid to Coal Mines Insurance, the Mine Safety Levy investment returns and, of course, from commercially sourced revenue. As a result of two decisions of the New South Wales Supreme Court the monopoly over workers compensation insurance in the coalmining industry has for a number of years been under threat, which in turn threatens the ongoing provision of these vital health and rescue services that I outlined earlier. In the case of Kuypers v Ashton Coal Operations Pty Ltd, the Supreme Court concluded that in order for the special insurer of employers in the coal industry to be liable for an injured employee's claim, the employer must be an employer "in" the coalmining industry. In its reasoning the court confirmed the earlier ruling by the New South Wales Court of Appeal in Central West Group apprentices Ltd v Coal Mines Insurance Ltd in 2008, that the phrase "employer in the coal industry" requires a substantive connection between the entity and the coal industry to satisfy the relationship required by the preposition "in" beyond merely being the employer of a person who works in and about a mine. Working in and about a mine is the statutory test for workers to access workers compensation payments in the coal industry in this State. There were two different definitions of employer and employee in related but different pieces of legislation, which led to the court taking what I think was an unduly narrow and technical approach, which I will develop in a moment. The practical effect of the two decisions is that an entity that provides services that are integral to the coalmining industry does not necessarily lead to a finding that it is in the coalmining industry. To determine whether or not an employer is in the coalmining industry the courts found it was necessary to assess the substantive character of the industrial enterprise in which the employer is engaged and its connection with the coal industry. It sounds fair enough, but in the case of Kuypers the company at issue provided services such as exploration drilling, drilling service holes and drilling to enable dewatering of a site.... FULL TRANSCRIPT AT http://adamsearle.org/in-the-legislative-council/debate-on-bills/coal-industry-amendment-bill-2018/
Views: 65 Adam Searle MLC
[Legislative Council] Adani Carmichael Coalmine Proposal Impact
 
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2 May 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Adjournment Debate - Adani Carmichael Coalmine Proposal Impact The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 17:41 ): The Adani coal mine proposal in Queensland's Galilee Basin should not proceed. It should not proceed if we support the coal industry in New South Wales and the many jobs and economic support it provides to the regions and the State as a whole. Based on publicly available information, we know that the proposed Adani mine in Queensland does not stack up environmentally or even economically. If it such a great idea why is it seeking a $1 billion Federal loan? It is now a matter of record that the big four banks will not fund the Adani mine. This is a pretty clear indication that it is completely bananas economically. Banks are not known to be philanthropic or to have a social conscience, but they do know how to make a buck. If they are not willing to invest in a project it is probably not going to earn a profit. It is clear that the Adani mine proposal represents a clear and present threat to the New South Wales economy and to the State budget. Increasing the global supply of thermal coal by the 6 per cent represented by Adani will place downward pressure on prices received by New South Wales coal exporters and slash mining royalties paid to the State Government by tens and possibly hundreds of millions per year. That would undermine the integrity of the New South Wales budget and its capacity to deliver basic services. It would put existing mine operations and jobs in New South Wales at risk. That is the evidence given by Adani to the Queensland land court in connection with the mine approvals. It acknowledged that its mine proposal would have a negative impact on mines in Queensland and elsewhere in Australia. The world thermal coal market is flat and likely to contract. No-one is predicting any real growth. There is a debate among economists about whether the change in demand for thermal coal is cyclical or structural—a significant increase in production of thermal coal will not lead to higher overall sales and prices. In a statement this week Mr Jonathan van Rooyen, General Manager, Investments for the Port of Newcastle's half-share owner Gardior, said the Adani mine would unarguably reduce world coal prices and the volume of coal mined in the Hunter. He further stated that the Federal Government would "distort competition and create sovereign risk" by subsidising Adani in a "shrinking world coal market". Further he said: There is n o avoiding the simple mathematics that if Turnbull succeeds in pushing between 25 million and 60 million tonnes of subsidised new coal into a flat world market the volume of coal mined and exported from the Hunter and Illawarra will decline. As will royalt ies collected by the New South Wales Government and the number of coal jobs in the Hunter and Illawarra. It echoes comments made in 2015 by senior Glencore coal division executive Peter Freyberg who criticised proposed Federal Government subsidies to Adani. He stated, "Bringing on additional tonnes with the aid of taxpayer money would materially increase the risk to existing coal operations" and would "distort competition and create sovereign risk" by subsidising Adani in a "shrinking world coal market. In a report issued last week by the Australia Institute, titled "Royalty Flush—the risks to NSW coal royalty revenue from Adani subsidy", economist Rod Campbell stated: The subsidised development of the Adani mine represents a threat not just to Newcastle Port but to all mines in the Hunter. With flat world demand, subsidising a large amount of new supply is economic madness. To place this in perspective: the Saudis have around 14 per cent of the traded world market in oil. Did they get rich by flooding the market with oil or by carefully rationing the supply to international markets? Australia has around 20 per cent of the traded world market in thermal coal. In contrast to the Saudi approach, it has approved as many mines as companies want to build. In my view, future approval processes need to be mindful not only of the cumulative impact on land and water but also of the level of supply and likely demand and price to be obtained by the resource. After all, the resource—contrary to the views of coalmining companies—does not belong to any mining company but to the wider community and government has a responsibility to ensure that if the resource is developed or extracted that the best price is obtained. FULL TRANSCRIPT at https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/Hansard/Pages/HansardResult.aspx#/docid/HANSARD-1820781676-73122/link/95
Views: 66 Adam Searle MLC
[Legislative Council] QWN - Coal Industry Workers Compensation
 
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22 November 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Question Without Notice - Coal Industry Workers Compensation The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 15:17 ): My question without notice is directed to the Leader for the Government and Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts. Earlier this year the Opposition asked about the impact on workers compensation insurance arrangements in the New South Wales coalmining industry of the Supreme Court decision of Kuypers v Ashton Coal Operations. Given his deferred answer of 8 August, 106 days ago, when will the Government develop what he described as an "appropriate response to maintain suitable workers compensation arrangements and a health and safety scheme that protects workers"? The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 15:18 ): I thank the honourable member for his question. I certainly have not forgotten the answer that I gave or the issue, which is an important one. The ongoing arrangements for workers whose coverage under current legislation is affected by that particular decision is a very significant issue indeed. For the information of the House, Coal Services is an industry-owned organisation that has statutory functions, as outlined within the New South Wales Coal Industry Act 2001. These functions include, but are not limited to, providing workers compensation, occupational health and rehabilitation services, collecting statistics and providing mine rescue emergency services and training to the New South Wales coal industry. Section 31 of the Coal Industry Act 2001 allows Coal Services to require an employer in the coal industry to effect workers compensation for its employees through Coal Mines Insurance. Coal Services and Coal Mines Insurance have submitted a proposal to consider amendments to the Coal Industry Act 2001 to further clarify the definition of an employer in the coal industry. Coal Services has raised concerns about the definition of an employer in the coal industry following the decision of the court in the case of Kuypers v Ashton Coal Operations Pty Ltd—referred to by the Hon. Adam Searle in his question—where the definition was specifically considered. I have asked the department to progress consideration of the policy and legal implications of the Coal Services proposal. They are at an advanced stage and I am hoping to make an announcement shortly.
Views: 10 Adam Searle MLC
Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History
 
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Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Small-scale mining of surface deposits dates back thousands of years. For example, in Roman Britain, the Romans were exploiting most of the major coalfields by the late 2nd century AD. Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 9647 Classic History
[Legislative Council] 2R - Mining Amendment (Climate Protection—No New Coal Mines) Bill 2017
 
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30 March 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament 2nd Reading Speech - Mining Amendment (Climate Protection—No New Coal Mines) Bill 2017 The Hon. ADAM SEARL E ( 12:06 ): I speak for the Labor Opposition on the Mining Amendment (Climate Protection—No New Coal Mines) Bill 2016. I do so as the Leader of the Opposition in this place and as the shadow Minister for Industry, Resources and Energy. Labor's position on this bill is very clear: we do not support the bill before the House. We think that this is too blunt an instrument and it will be highly destructive for the industry, the economy of New South Wales and indeed all of those who depend upon the industry for economic support. But that should not be confused with being an uncritical urger or booster of mining or coalmining generally. The Labor Party, given its history rooted in coalmining communities and other working communities over more than a century, has historically been very supportive of the development of the resources industry, including coalmining. We remain supportive of coalminers and their communities. We are very conscious of the important economic activity that comes from coalmining in this State. For example, we know that New South Wales mines produced 260 million tonnes of raw coal and 196 million tonnes of saleable coal in 2013. We know that the mining industry was worth over $21 billion, including nearly $18 billion worth of coal. We know that around 85 per cent of the coal dug out of the ground in New South Wales is exported, and the rest is used to generate electricity. Even the Government's most recent Renewable Energy Action Plan, which was 18 months late, and I will come back to that, says that about 79 per cent of the electricity upon which we depend daily still comes from coal-fired power. The 136 million tonnes of coal exported was worth about $15.2 billion. Coal accounted for about 31 per cent of all merchandise leaving New South Wales, making it the State's single most valuable export commodity. The minerals industry pays about $1.6 billion to the New South Wales Government. About $1.3 billion of that is paid in royalties, the overwhelming majority of which comes from the coal industry. Nearly $135 million has been paid in payroll tax and nearly $146 million in land tax. The mining industry also pays nearly $1.5 billion to the Commonwealth Government, and that is overwhelmingly paid by the coal industry. In 2013, the value of employment and other value-added aspects of investment in the coal industry was nearly $10 billion. It contributes $1.4 billion to the Central West economy, nearly $1 billion to the Illawarra economy, $6.3 billion to the Hunter economy, and more than $300 million to the New England and north-west economies. The mining sector, and predominantly the coalmining sector, generates about 20 per cent of the economic activity and 10 per cent of the jobs in the Central West and 7 per cent of jobs in the Hunter region. The coal industry historically has been, and it remains, very significant in this State. It pays $1.3 billion in royalties, although the New South Wales Treasury can never get the royalty figure right—it always overestimates it. That money provides more than 11,000 teachers for our schools. More than 30,000 people work in this State's mining industry, but that figure fluctuates between 30,000 and 44,000. Of course, it has other impacts across supply chains; it impacts not only mining directly— The Hon. Robert Brown: It has impacts across whole industries. The Hon. ADAM SEARLE: I acknowledge that interjection. The Labor Party is extremely conscious of the economic importance of the industry. It is also conscious of the importance of employment to people; it gives them a sense of purpose and economic security, which enables them to raise their families and to go about their lives. However, the Labor Party is also aware of the reality of climate change. I disagree with the previous speaker. People on my side of politics understand that climate change is real and that it is being accelerated by human activity. We do not shy away from that. We also acknowledge that Australia's carbon emissions are led by coal-fired power. We know that fossil fuel, primarily coal, comprises up to 80 per cent of our emissions. We also know that more needs to be done because we have only one planet on which to live. It sustains all of us, and if we destroy it we have nowhere else to go.... FULL TRANSCRIPT at https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/Hansard/Pages/HansardResult.aspx#/docid/HANSARD-1820781676-72882/link/95
Views: 6 Adam Searle MLC
A judge rejected a coal mine because of climate change. Here's what that could mean
 
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A judge rejected a coal mine because of climate change. Here's what that could mean: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-12/rocky-hill-ruling-more-courts-choose-climate-over-coal/10802930. Thanks for watching, subscribe for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPLbW-HoiBuA8yepLypwA6g?sub_confirmation=1 Landmark Rocky Hill ruling could pave the way for more courts to choose climate over coal The Conversation By Justine Bell-James  On Friday, Chief Judge Brian Preston of the New South Wales Land and Environment Court handed down a landmark judgement confirming a decision to refuse a new open-cut coal mine near Gloucester in the Hunter Valley. The proposed Rocky Hill mine's contribution to climate change was one of the key reasons cited for refusing the application. The decision has prompted celebration among environmentalists, for whom climate-based litigation has long been an uphill battle. New coal power is not the answer The tipping point's been reached: the cold, hard numbers show that new renewable energy is supplying cheaper electricity than new coal-fired power plants could and will continue do so, writes Stephen Long.    Defeating a mining proposal on climate grounds involves clearing several high hurdles. Generally speaking, the court must be convinced not only that the proposed mine would contribute to climate change, but also that this issue is relevant under the applicable law. To do this, a litigant needs to convince a court of a few key things, which include that:the proponent is responsible for the ultimate burning of the coal, even if it is burned by a third party, andthis will result in increased greenhouse emissions, which in turn contributes to climate change. In his judgement, Judge Preston took a broad view and readily connected these causal dots, ruling that:    Other courts (such as in Queensland, where the proposed Adani coalmine has successfully cleared various legal hurdles) have tended to take a narrower approach to statutory interpretation, with climate change just one of numerous relevant factors under consideration. In contrast, Judge Preston found climate change to be one of the more important factors to consider under NSW legislation. To rule against a coalmine on climate grounds, the court also needs to resist the "market substitution" argument — the suggestion that if the proponent does not mine and sell coal, someone else will. This argument has become a common "defence" in climate litigation, and indeed was advanced by Gloucester Resources in the Rocky Hill case. Judge Preston rejected the argument, describing it as "flawed". He noted that there is no certainty that overseas mines will substitute for the Rocky Hill coalmine. Given increasing global momentum to tackle climate change, he noted that other countries may well follow this lead in rejecting future coalmine proposals. He also stated that:Climate change was not the only consideration There should be no doubt that this is a hugely significant ruling. However, there are several caveats to bear in mind. First, there are avenues of appeal. In the absence of a robust legislative framework prohibiting mining operations, it is ultimately up to a court to interpret legislation and weigh up the relevant factors and evidence.    The NSW Land and Environm #A, #judge, #rejected, #coal, #mine, #because, #climate, #change, #Here, #what, #that, #could, #mean #mining, #environmentallaw, #coal, #newsouthwalescoalmining, #rockyhill, #courtruling
Views: 19 Tran Nam
Milne: We have to restore the health of our democracy
 
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Greens Leader Christine Milne speaks to a motion in the Senate, that: That the Senate— (a) notes: (i) the negative impacts of coal and coal seam gas mining on Australia's environment, including prime agricultural land and water, and the wellbeing of regional communities, and (ii) the concerning relationship between these mining activities and political corruption, particularly in New South Wales, as evidenced by the findings of the Independent Commission Against Corruption; and (b) calls on all parties contesting the New South Wales state election to commit to a ban on coal and coal seam gas mining.
Views: 1537 The Australian Greens
Historic Mining Photographs from the 1900 Annual Report of the NSW Department of Mines (slide show)
 
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The Annual Report of the NSW Department of Mines for 1900 contains many fascinating photographs of mines and mining related activities. Enjoy, comment, subscribe! My Blogs: http://www.johnsbluemountainsblog.blogspot.com.au and http://www.johnsnewenglandminerals.blogspot.com.au/
Views: 211 John Paix
OCE meaning
 
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OCE Meaning www.opencutexaminer.co [email protected] What does OCE mean? Meaning or definition Well, under the Surface Coal Mining Legislation in Australia the OCE meaning is an 'Experienced Surface Coal Mine Worker' who has undertaken appropriate study, developed specific operational skills and satisfied the Board of Examiners that they are worthy (have the appropriate knowledge, skills and aptitude) of being granted an Open Cut Examiners Certificate of Competency. The role of an Open Cut Examiner is a statutory role under the Queensland & New South Wales Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation
Views: 78 Open Cut Examiner
Who or What is an Open Cut Examiner?
 
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Who or what is an Open Cut Examiner? https://www.opencutexaminer.com/who-or-what-is-an-oce/ [email protected] WHO OR WHAT IS AN OPEN CUT EXAMINER? (DEFINITION) An OCE is an ‘experienced coal mine worker’ who has undertaken appropriate study, developed specific operational skills and satisfied the Board of Examiners that they are worthy (have the appropriate knowledge, skills and aptitude) of being granted an Open Cut Examiners Certificate of Competency. The role of an Open Cut Examiner is a statutory role under the Queensland & New South Wales Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation. Eg QCMS&H Act 1999 – Section 59 Additional requirements for management of surface mines A site senior executive must appoint a person holding an open cut examiner’s certificate of competency to carry out the responsibilities and duties prescribed under a regulation in 1 or more surface mine excavations. The role and responsibilities of an Open Cut Examiner are defined in the Queensland Coal Mining Safety & Health Regulations 2001. This is where the primary or main role/responsibility is found. QCMS&H Regulations 2001 – Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner Section 105 Open-cut examiner’s responsibilities and duties—general (1) The site senior executive must ensure— (a) the main responsibility of an open-cut examiner for the mine is the safety and health of persons in or around the surface excavation during mining activities in or around the surface excavation; and (b) the open-cut examiner’s main duties relate to the main responsibility. (2) Subsection (1)(b) does not prevent the open-cut examiner having other duties at the mine, including, for example, duties given to the examiner under the mine’s safety and health management system. There are a number of additional key responsibilities under the QCMS&H Regulations Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner and further responsibilities that may apply from time to time throughout the Regulations.
Views: 73 Open Cut Examiner
NSW Greens - phase out coal mining policy - Jeremy Buckingham
 
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ENOUGH ALREADY! Scientists say we must rapidly phase out coal, yet NSW continues to approve new coal mines. Check out and share this video where I outline the Greens' serious plan to phase out thermal coal in the next 10 years, limiting the amount of coal that can be mined to 1 billion tonnes. Australia is the world's largest coal exporter, accounting for a whopping 38.3% of global seaborne coal exports! Ending coal exports from Australia is the biggest single contribution we could make to stopping climate change. Over 90% of the coal we mine is for export so, even if we change our domestic electricity generation to 100% renewable, if we continue coal mining our contribution to global warming will still be massive. The Greens plan would: * Cap the amount of thermal coal that can be mined in NSW over the next decade at one billion tonnes. After 10 years all thermal coal mines would be closed in NSW; * Require mining companies to take part in a competitive auction to purchase the right to mine coal in line with caps during the phase out period; * Allocate mining royalties earned during the phase out to a transition fund for affected workers and regional economies. * Legislate to ensure that no compensation is payable to coal mining and fossil fuel exploration companies. Investors have been aware of the potential impact of addressing climate change on their industry for many decades. No action will see 2 billion tonnes of coal mined in NSW over the next decade. We have a climate emergency and the failure by successive governments to act earlier means we need a rapid transition. Every day we delay will make the transition harder and the consequences of climate change worse.
Views: 68 Jeremy Buckingham
[Legislative Council] QWN - Shenhua Watermark Exploration Licence
 
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5 June 2018 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament SPEECH TYPE - Shenhua Watermark Exploration Licence The Hon. ADAM SEARLE (16:00): My question without notice is directed to the Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts. In light of the Government's agreement to provide $262 million to Shenhua on the expiration of its mining exploration licence on the Liverpool Plains and for the permanent surrender of half that exploration licence, has the Government yet paid the funds to Shenhua and, if so, when did that payment occur? The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) (16:01): I will come back to the date on which payment was made to Shenhua. In 2008 Shenhua won a competitive tender for the area now covered by exploration licence 7223 that included paying the New South Wales Government around $300 million. On 12 July 2017 the New South Wales Government reached agreement with Shenhua to excise 51.4 per cent of its exploration licence 7223 that encroached on the flat fertile Liverpool Plains. The agreement included a refund, as the Hon. Adam Searle noted in his question, of $262 million. The refund of $262 million represents 51.4 per cent of the original $300 million received, adjusted for today's value commensurate with the 51.4 per cent of the title area recovered by the Government. I apologise for the pause; I do not have the date. I will give the member an answer at the end of question time.
Views: 56 Adam Searle MLC
Coal seam gas mining - can the Premier stop this? Professor Anne Twomey explains.
 
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Anne Twomey is Professor of Constitutional Law in the Sydney University Law School. In this interview with Professor David Flint she answers questions on the law -- and not the policy - relating to the power of the states to expropriate property. This was raised on talk back radio recently in an interview with the NSW Premier, Barry O'Farrell by 2GB's Alan Jones. This was in the context of the cancel licenses and exploration permits relating to coal seam gas mining on prime agricultural and urban land. (Professor Twomey's answer relates to the general power of states to expropriate and not to the detail of the legislation governing mining in New South Wales.)
Views: 211 CANdoAust
[Legislative Council] QWN - Adani Carmichael Coalmine Proposal Impact
 
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3 May 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Question Without Notice - Adani Carmichael Coalmine Proposal Impact The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 14:29 ): My question is directed to the Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities. The recent report of the Australia Institute stated that if all the Galilee Basin in Queensland were developed New South Wales royalty revenue would be cut by amounts of up to $349 million and that "the New South Wales Government should strongly oppose taxpayer subsidy of Adani's infrastructure". What is the Government's response to the concerns of the New South Wales community and business about the Turnbull Government's proposed $1 billion loan to the Adani Carmichael coalmine? The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 14:30 ): The Australia Institute has questioned the impact of the approved Queensland Adani coalmine on, among other things, royalty returns to New South Wales. The Adani Carmichael coalmine proposes to produce 60 million tonnes per annum of thermal coal from a combined open cut and underground mine. In 2015-16 coal production in New South Wales was approximately 190 million tonnes, of which 170 million tonnes was exported primarily to the Asian market. The high quality of export thermal coal from New South Wales commands a higher price on account of having lower ash and fewer emissions than other inferior quality products. The coal within the Adani Carmichael coalmine has targeted production of approximately 25 per cent ash content, representing a much lower value coal than that of New South Wales export quality thermal coal, with less than 15 per cent ash content. The quality of coal from the Adani Carmichael coalmine represents a market segment that generally constitutes less than 3 to 5 per cent of exports of coal from New South Wales. The Government recognises the important contribution that mining this high-quality product makes to the New South Wales Government, particularly in regional areas. I am aware of suggestions that the northern Australia infrastructure facility, which is a Commonwealth initiative offering up to $5 billion in concessional loans, is led by an independent board with representation from a variety of States. Obviously decisions as to how that facility is used are best directed to the Federal Minister by the Hon. Adam Searle's Federal colleagues. Referring to the coal and its quality—a critical element of this question—the New South Wales Government is confident that its coal industry is robust and will continue to provide the royalty stream that underlines much of the Government's activities relating to hospitals, schools and roads. The New South Wales Government is confident of the viability of this industry, regardless of proposals elsewhere, and is committed to it, given its importance to regional communities and regional jobs. The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 14:34 ): I ask a supplementary question. Will the Minister elucidate that part of his answer relating to the 170 million tonnes of coal from New South Wales being exported with reference to what this Government is doing to avoid the potential displacement of those coal exports by the Adani Carmichael coalmine? The Hon. Scott Farlow: Point of order: That obviously was not a supplementary question but a new question. The Hon. Adam Searle sought elucidation but he asked a further question that did not seek elucidation. The Hon. Shaoquett Moselmane: To the point of order: The Hon. Adam Searle clearly sought elucidation of an aspect of the Minister's answer. In my view the question is in order. The PRESIDENT: When members have finished giving their rulings, I will give mine. The supplementary question was in order. The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 14:35 ): From what I said in my earlier answer I thought it was clear that the New South Wales Government is comfortable and is not concerned about ongoing coal exports. I am surprised that the Opposition is placing so much emphases on a report from the Australia Institute that also said in a report titled "Never going to dig you up" that phasing out the New South Wales coal industry would have no effect on the New South Wales economy. How much weight can be placed on any Australia Institution report on this matter? As to the other aspects of the Hon. Adam Searle's question, I refer him to my earlier answer.
Views: 14 Adam Searle MLC
[Legislative Council] QWN - Wollongong Coal
 
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1 June 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Question Without Notice - Wollongong Coal The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 14:29 ): I direct my question to the Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, Minister for the Arts, and Vice-President of the Executive Council. Given the Minister's answer in this place on 8 March and the development yesterday that the Australian Stock Exchange has halted trading in Wollongong Coal Limited shares, what is the status of the NSW Resources Regulator's investigations into whether that company is a fit a proper person to hold a mining licence in this State? The Hon. Greg Donnelly: What an excellent question. I could see that coming from a mile away. The Hon. Shayne Mallard: No-one mentioned a word yesterday. The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 14:30 ): I am sorry to get in the way of the discussion between two members. The PRESIDENT: Order! It is clear that some members want an early mark. If I could give myself three calls to order, I would do so and take an early mark, but I cannot. However, I can call members to order. I suggest that members let this hour pass in an appropriate manner. The H on. DON HARWIN: Of course, Wollongong Coal Limited is the owner of the Russell Vale Colliery and Wongawilli Colliery located in the southern coalfields near Wollongong, and Jindal Steel and Power Limited owns a 60.3 per cent holding in Wollongong Coal. On 29 April it was announced that Jindal Steel and Power Limited, and one of its directors had been investigated by India's Central Bureau of Investigation on potential criminal corruption charges. The courts in India decided that there was sufficient evidence for a case to be brought to trial. I am advised that no conviction of criminal corruption has been made at this stage. The chief compliance officer of the NSW Resources Regulator approved a full review of Wollongong Coal's fitness to hold an authority under section 380A of the Mining Act last year, and that review is ongoing. In light of recent events, I have asked for an update on that review, which I have not yet received. However, when I do receive it I will be happy to pass it on to the House. The Hon. Walt Secord: Mr President, wakey, wakey! The PRESIDENT: Order! For the benefit of members and anyone reading Hansard, I assume that "Mr President, wakey, wakey" was not directed to me. "No" would be a suitable response. The Hon. Walt Secord: No, Mr President.
Views: 20 Adam Searle MLC
[Legislative Council] 2R - Wyong Special Area (Protection) Bill 2018
 
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8 March 2018 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament 2nd Reading Speech - Wyong Special Area (Protection) Bill 2018 FULL TRANSCRIPT AT https://adamsearle.org/in-the-legislative-council/debate-on-bills/wyong-special-area-protection-bill-2018/ Today I introduce the Wyong Special Area (Protection) Bill 2018, which keeps an election promise made by the New South Wales Labor Opposition and Mr David Harris, MP, during the 2015 State election campaign. In a twist of historical irony, it also keeps a promise made by the Liberal Party during the 2007 and 2011 election campaigns—a promise that to this day the Liberal Party has not honoured. I will speak more about that later. This is an Act to prohibit the granting, renewal or modification of exploration, prospecting and mining authorities and titles for minerals and petroleum, and certain planning approvals, that relate to land at Wyong that is the site of the Wallarah 2 Coal Project, and for other purposes. The proposed Act defines the Wyong special area in clause 3 as the area defined to mean the land subject to certain exploration licences and an authorisation granted under the Mining Act 1992, namely EL6514, EL4911 and A405. Clause 4 prohibits the grant or renewal of any mining authorisation in relation to land in the Wyong special area and the making of any changes to the conditions to which such an authorisation is subject. Clause 5 prohibits the grant or renewal of any petroleum title defined in the Act and the making of any changes to the conditions to which such title is subject. Clause 6 provides that a planning approval is not to be given under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 in relation to development for the purposes of prospecting and mining activities on land in the Wyong special area and cancels any such planning approval already given. The bill seeks to protect the Wyong water catchment area from destructive mining, thereby protecting the important water supply, which serves more than 300,000 people. Further, the bill is required to fulfil an allegedly ironclad election commitment made by the Liberal Party in 2007 and 2011, and of course by my party, the Labor Opposition, in 2015. The South Korean Government owned mining company Korea Resources Corporation [KORES], submitted, under the Wallarah 2 Coal Project, a new application to build a longwall coalmine beneath the Wyong water catchment valleys affecting the Dooralong and Yarramalong valleys. These valleys are the major drinking water resource for more than 350,000 people. Wyong Shire Council, Gosford City Council and the Joint Water Authority engaged Professor Philip Pells to prepare the water section of their submission against the Wallarah 2 Coal Project. Professor Pells demonstrated, using the mining company's own data, that there would be a catastrophic loss of water in the catchment if the proposal proceeded. In 1999, when BHP Billiton owned the lease under its subsidiary Coal Operations Australia Limited, its well-credentialed and respected hydrology consultant, Mitchell McCotter, found in its report produced in 1999 that there were transient pathways in the geology that would enable surface water and aquifer water to travel to the mine workings if mining occurred. These facts were presented at the Chikarovski inquiry in 2008 and were ignored by the panel members. In March 2011, prior to the State election that year, the then Minister for Planning, Tony Kelly, rejected the mine proposal. In a letter to the community group fighting against the mine, the Australian Coal Alliance, he said: The project does not adequately address potential surface water quality impacts, resulting in uncertainty around the ability of the project to meet acceptable water quality outcomes. The Minister , in rejecting the mine application , further stated: The project is not considered consistent with the principles of ecologically sustainable development, including the precautionary principle, and as a consequence is not considered to be in the public interest. Leading up to this decision the Liberal Party in opposition championed the community's cause again s t the mining project , and the two particular proponents were Chris Hartcher and Barry O 'Farrell. The Liberal Party committed itself in writing twice that if elected it would not allow the coalmine proposal in the water catchment valleys. Barry O'Farrell stood before a crowd of more than 300 people at a rally in January 2009 and said : The next Liberal-National government will not allow mining to occur here, will not allow mining to occur in any water catchment. Mining leases and mining permits will reflect that common sense. No ifs, no buts, a guarantee...... FULL TRANSCRIPT AT https://adamsearle.org/in-the-legislative-council/debate-on-bills/wyong-special-area-protection-bill-2018/
Views: 39 Adam Searle MLC
[Legislative Council] QWN - Hunter Region Coal Mining
 
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23 February 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Question Without Notice - Hunter Region Coal Mining The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 15:12 ): My question without notice is directed to the Leader of the Government in his capacity as Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and also as representing the Minister for Planning. Given that the Planning and Assessment Commission has now rejected the proposed Drayton South Mine expansion for the fourth time, will your Government now support Labor's policy of minimum setbacks to protect critical industry clusters such as thoroughbred horse breeding and the viticulture industry in the Hunter Valley, as promised by your party in 2011? And will the Minister now rule out allowing further planning applications in respect of the same project? The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 15:13 ): Unlike those opposite, this Government supports a strong and transparent mining sector. We expect a mining sector that complies with our high social and environmental expectations. That is why we are implementing a strategic release framework to front end those valuations on any future areas for potential release. We have also brought rigour back to our independent planning assessment framework for any mining proposals. This has been in conjunction with bringing clarity and consistency to our frameworks. The Government is committed to halving the time taken to assess State significant development applications, including mining projects. I can inform members that the Independent Planning and Assessment Commission has indeed refused consent for the Drayton South project. In its determination, the Commission recognised that the mining industry delivers significant economic benefits in its own right and flow-on benefits to a number of associated industries. However, the commission determined that the project is not unique, nor is it the primary contributor to the wider coal industry in the Hunter Valley. The commission considers that a unique set of circumstances exists due to the proximity between the project and the thoroughbred operations of the Coolmore and Godolphin studs. The commission found there would be key effects relating to air quality, blast noise and reputation on the studs. The commission also found that approval of the project would be contrary to the coexistence and diversification principles found in the Hunter Regional Plan 2036, the Upper Hunter Strategic Land Use Policy and local council strategies. In response to concerns raised during this and other approval processes for State significant developments, the Minister for Planning has asked his department to develop options for consultation that will provide guidance on how many times and how frequently a project that is not substantially different can be submitted to government for approval. We have a strong and robust approach to regulation and planning approvals for the mining sector. It is clear that is required to protect the mining sector, which is not only important for the State but also to ensure communities are protected and that lives are not disrupted. I am satisfied that going forward we have a robust approach to those issues.
Views: 2 Adam Searle MLC
[Legislative Council] QWN - Nuclear Power
 
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23 May 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Question Without Notice - Nuclear Power The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 16:00 ): My question without notice is directed to the Minister for Energy and Utilities in his capacity as the Minister and the Leader of the Government. In light of Deputy Premier, and Minister for Regional New South Wales, John Barilaro's recent statements saying that New South Wales can fix its energy problems with nuclear power, what scoping studies or modelling has his Government undertaken on this issue? The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 16:00 ): I do not think there has ever been a more exciting time to be the Minister responsible for the energy security of New South Wales. I cannot think of any other portfolio where technology, economics, engineering and climate compete for attention as intensely as in the energy portfolio. To steer us through this complex area the Government has made a commitment to support solutions which deliver a reliable, affordable and clean energy future for households and businesses. The Government's commitment is to achieve this at the least cost to the energy consumer and with maximum benefits to New South Wales. At present the major proportion of the New South Wales generating fleet comprises power stations that use either coal or gas and emit carbon dioxide. Nuclear energy is widely considered a low-carbon emissions energy source and it plays a significant role in some countries. Given our aim of moving New South Wales to net zero emissions by 2050, this feature of nuclear energy is not something that should be passed over lightly. However, there are several important factors in play when considering nuclear power in New South Wales. Firstly, New South Wales legislation prohibits the mining of uranium and the construction and operation of nuclear reactors for non-research purposes. This prohibition, introduced in 1986, was motivated by concerns about the safety of nuclear power and the management of its waste, I presume; it was an act of a previous Labor government. The Government recognises community concerns continue about nuclear power and will engage with the public on securing the State's future energy needs. There is no proposal, however, to change the legislative framework for nuclear power. Secondly, electricity generated by nuclear power may not be cheap. In fact, of all the technologies that could possibly assist in meeting our net zero emissions target, nuclear energy is frequently rated as one of the more expensive. The market is currently focused on renewables, backed up by peaking gas plants and storage to manage intermittency. These are cheaper options than new base load power plants, including nuclear. We need least-cost options for downward pressure on prices. It is not the role of the New South Wales Government to decide on the commercial viability of technologies. We need national market reform to allow the private sector to invest confidently in new least-cost generation. There is, however, a rapid pace of technology change, so we need to keep abreast of and open to information on new and changing technologies.
Views: 7 Adam Searle MLC
[Legislative Council] QWN - Shenhua Watermark Project
 
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21 February 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Question Without Notice - Shenhua Watermark Project The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 16:0 0 ): My question without notice is to the Leader of the Government, the Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts. Given that Shenhua's Watermark mine exploration licence—issued in 2008 and renewed in 2012—provides that if substantial development of a mine does not occur within eight years of the granting of the original exploration licence, the Minister has the power to cancel the licence, what is your response to Shenhua’s application to your Government for an exemption from the compliance date, which was 22 October last year? The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 16:00 ): On 11 August 2016 the New South Wales Government announced that negotiations with Shenhua Watermark Coal Pty Ltd had commenced to secure the excising of the parts of its title that encroached onto the strategic agricultural land of the Liverpool plains. The Shenhua Watermark project was approved by the Planning Assessment Commission on 28 January 2015. The project also required approval under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The then Commonwealth Minister for the Environment, Greg Hunt, announced conditional approval on 8 July 2015, seeking the advice of the expert scientific committee prior to approving the water management plan. The plan, along with 24 other management plans, must also be submitted and approved by the Minister before construction could commence. As of January 2017, Shenhua has completed some, but not all, of the 24 plans required in order to commence construction. Further questions in that respect, as I am sure the member would appreciate, are largely matters that should be directed to the Federal Government. I might also add that on 19 February 2016 the Land and Environment Court dismissed the New South Wales Environmental Defender’s Office challenge against the Watermark project, which argued the project was too great a threat to local koala populations. A mining lease application has not yet been lodged over the area; however, when it is, it will be rigorously assessed in line with the legislation and current government policies, guidelines and procedures. The company submitted an application for renewal of its exploration licence, EL7223, on 5 February 2016. This will be assessed by my department before a recommendation is made to me to consider in due course in accordance with normal protocols.
Views: 10 Adam Searle MLC
Historic Coal Mining Scenes
 
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Description: Coal mining has a rich and diverse history in communities across the United States. These images, gathered from OSMRE’s archives, show a glimpse at the process and production of coal during the early industrialization phase of resource extraction.
Views: 233 OSMRE
Pat Murphy's 'living nightmare' coal mine
 
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Pat Murphy's 800ha farm is just over one kilometre from the controversial Maules Creek coal mine. No pollution limits were placed on Pat's land when the Maules Creek mine was approved by New South Wales planning authorities and he says his life is now a 'living nightmare.' Australian Story, ABC, 27 June 2016. The NSW Government has let the coal mining industry get away with unsafe levels of air and noise pollution for too many years. People that live near coal mines report getting sick, being unable to sleep, and a hard slog to get any help from the Government. Instead of making the companies stick to safe limit of dust and pollution, the Government just tells the coal companies to buy up vast swathes of rural land. But if your place isn't on the list to get bought, you can't get out, you're trapped breathing the dust of NSW's worst neighbours. We need to make the the Government put proper limits in place to protect people dangerous air pollution. https://hunterenvironmentcentre.good.do/fairgo/cleanair/
Front Line Action on Coal: "Muzz" occupier of Leard Forest Interview
 
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The Leard State Forest in New South Wales Australian is being destroyed by Coal Miners. Murray is has been living in Leard forest since August 2012 and campaign against the destruction of the forest. contacts for "Muzz" is 0418 754 869 [email protected] Muzz runs tours of the Leard Forest www.mysterydingo.com https://www.facebook.com/FrontLineActionOnCoal?fref=ts
Views: 445 Shayne Hunter
[Legislative Council] QWN - AusGold Mining Group
 
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15 November 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament Question Without Notice - AusGold Mining Group The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 14:30 ): My question without notice is directed to the Minister for Resources. Given the recent collapse of the AusGold mining project in Tibooburra, is the Government investigating its activities and, if so, will the Minister update the House on the status of any investigation? The Hon. DON HARWIN (Minister for Resources, Minister for Energy and Utilities, and Minister for the Arts) ( 14:31 ): Ms Sally Zou owns a small goldmine of 17 hectares in Tibooburra in the far north-west of New South Wales. Development consent for the Good Friday Mine was approved in August 2016. The Tibooburra goldmine, which is yet to begin production, is anticipated to provide direct employment for 16 people, inject more than $40 million into the local economy over the life of the mine and generate a total of $7.8 million in royalties for New South Wales. Recent media coverage has raised questions about Ms Zou's AusGold operations. The takes the capability and responsibility of resource title holders very seriously. I encourage anyone who becomes aware of any breaches of conditions of title or the law or of other offences to report them to the relevant authorities. The resources regulator has confirmed that it has completed its investigation into AusGold Mining Group for alleged breaches of the Mining Act and documentation supplied as part of an application. The investigation found no breaches of the Act. However, the resources regulator also confirmed that it has received another complaint on an unrelated issue. That matter is now being assessed. As that assessment is ongoing, further details will not be released at this time and I therefore will not make any further comment on AusGold. I repeat, I encourage anyone who becomes aware of any breaches of conditions of title or the law or of other offences to report them to the relevant authorities.
Views: 49 Adam Searle MLC
A Year to Remember 1949: Miners' Strike, New South Wales, Australia
 
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BHP, coal, call train, NSW mines stand still,The 1949 Australian coal strike was the first time that Australian military forces were used during peacetime to break a trade union strike. ***** License this footage at Framepool: https://footage.framepool.com/en/shot/810300675 ***** Check out the Year to Remember Collection by Cinesound-Movietone: https://footage.framepool.com/en/collections/A-Year-To-Remember/
Views: 9 Timeline
A Year to Remember 1949: Miners' Strike, New South Wales, Australia
 
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The 1949 Australian coal strike was the first time that Australian military forces were used during peacetime to break a trade union strike. The strike by 23,000 coal miners lasted for seven weeks, from 27 June 1949 to 15 August 1949, with troops being sent in by the Ben Chifley Federal Labor government to the open cut coal mines in New South Wales, The miners' federation was heavily influenced at the time by the Communist Party of Australia. Strikers holding signs “Better wages and conditions for Miners, means better wages and conditions for all workers”. The Labor government passed legislation that made it illegal to give strikers and their families financial support (including credit from shops). On 5 July, union officials were ordered to hand over union funds to the industrial registrar. On the following day, union officials were arrested and the respective union and CPA headquarters raided. Lager crowds, protesters in streets. ***** License this footage at Framepool: https://footage.framepool.com/en/shot/981697252 ***** Check out the Year to Remember Collection by Cinesound-Movietone: https://footage.framepool.com/en/collections/A-Year-To-Remember/
Views: 17 Timeline
A Year to Remember 1949: Miners' Strike, New South Wales, Australia
 
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The 1949 Australian coal strike was the first time that Australian military forces were used during peacetime to break a trade union strike. The strike by 23,000 coal miners lasted for seven weeks, from 27 June 1949 to 15 August 1949, with troops being sent in by the Ben Chifley Federal Labor government to the open cut coal mines in New South Wales, The miners' federation was heavily influenced at the time by the Communist Party of Australia. The Labor government passed legislation that made it illegal to give strikers and their families financial support (including credit from shops). On 5 July, union officials were ordered to hand over union funds to the industrial registrar. On the following day, union officials were arrested and the respective union and CPA headquarters raided. ***** License this footage at Framepool: https://footage.framepool.com/en/shot/462831824 ***** Check out the Year to Remember Collection by Cinesound-Movietone: https://footage.framepool.com/en/collections/A-Year-To-Remember/
Views: 7 Timeline
The Mine Subsidence Board - About Us
 
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The Mine Subsidence Board is a service organisation operating for the community in coal mining areas of New South Wales, Australia, and is responsible for administering the Mine Subsidence Compensation Act. Our mission is to mitigate the effects of mine subsidence on the community by promoting compatibility between surface developments and underground coal mining, restoring damaged improvements and managing the compensation fund. for more information visit our website www.minesub.nsw.gov.au
Views: 913 MineSubBoard
A Year to Remember 1949: Miners' Strike, New South Wales, Australia
 
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The 1949 Australian coal strike was the first time that Australian military forces were used during peacetime to break a trade union strike. The strike by 23,000 coal miners lasted for seven weeks, from 27 June 1949 to 15 August 1949, with troops being sent in by the Ben Chifley Federal Labor government to the open cut coal mines in New South Wales, The miners' federation was heavily influenced at the time by the Communist Party of Australia. The Labor government passed legislation that made it illegal to give strikers and their families financial support (including credit from shops). On 5 July, union officials were ordered to hand over union funds to the industrial registrar. On the following day, union officials were arrested and the respective union and CPA headquarters raided. ***** License this footage at Framepool: https://footage.framepool.com/en/shot/623337947 ***** Check out the Year to Remember Collection by Cinesound-Movietone: https://footage.framepool.com/en/collections/A-Year-To-Remember/
Views: 16 Timeline
The Mine Subsidence Board - Surface Development Guidelines
 
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The Mine Subsidence Board is a service organisation operating for the community in coal mining areas of New South Wales, Australia, and is responsible for administering the Mine Subsidence Compensation Act. Our mission is to mitigate the effects of mine subsidence on the community by promoting compatibility between surface developments and underground coal mining, restoring damaged improvements and managing the compensation fund. for more information visit our website www.minesub.nsw.gov.au
Views: 1086 MineSubBoard
Missing Mt Penny documents from ICAC are tabled in the NSW Legislative Council - 15 March 2013
 
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Missing Mt Penny documents from ICAC are tabled in the NSW Legislative Council - 15 March 2013 Greens MP Jeremy Buckingham noticed that documents were being tabled at the ICAC Inquiry into alleged corruption of a coal mine tender in the Bylong Valley were not provided under a 'call for papers' made by the Parliament in a 2009. ICAC did a comparison of the documents it had found with those supplied to the parliament. If found that up to 700 documents that should have been supplied to the Parliament were not. The question is now who decided to withhold these documents and why? It certainly doesn't seem to be a coincidence and points to a cover up. www.jeremybuckingham.org
Views: 441 Jeremy Buckingham
The Mine Subsidence Board
 
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The Mine Subsidence Board is a service organisation operating for the community in coal mining areas of New South Wales, Australia, and is responsible for administering the Mine Subsidence Compensation Act. Our mission is to mitigate the effects of mine subsidence on the community by promoting compatibility between surface developments and underground coal mining, restoring damaged improvements and managing the compensation fund. for more information visit our website www.minesub.nsw.gov.au
Views: 1653 MineSubBoard
The Mine Subsidence Board - Heritage
 
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The Mine Subsidence Board is a service organisation operating for the community in coal mining areas of New South Wales, Australia, and is responsible for administering the Mine Subsidence Compensation Act. Our mission is to mitigate the effects of mine subsidence on the community by promoting compatibility between surface developments and underground coal mining, restoring damaged improvements and managing the compensation fund. for more information visit our website www.minesub.nsw.gov.au
Views: 311 MineSubBoard
John Ajaka MLC - Community Building Partnership Grants
 
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The Hon. John Ajaka MLC speaks in the NSW Legislative Council on a motion on Community Building Partnership Grants
Views: 94 JohnAjaka
Protect A Sacred Aboriginal Women's Fertility Site from Mining
 
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Read Aunty Beve's Open Letter: http://wakeup-world.com/2014/01/06/open-letter-from-aboriginal-elder-protect-our-sacred-womens-fertility-site/ New Zealand based sandmining company, Rocla, is planning to build a mine on a sacred Aboriginal Women's Fertility Rites songline and teaching place, in Calga on the Central Coast NSW. Original Elder 'Auntie' Beve had made it her mission to make all Australians aware of how significant this loss would be -- to help them fully understand the Cultural importance of this site, and why it must not be destroyed. Read more: http://wakeup-world.com/2014/01/06/open-letter-from-aboriginal-elder-protect-our-sacred-womens-fertility-site/ To voice your opinion on the proposed mining development and help Auntie Beve protect this important ancient ceremonial women's site, please contact the NSW Premier and the Ministers for Heritage and Aboriginal Affairs: Barry O'Farrell Premier, and Minister for Western Sydney: Phone (02) 9228 5239 Fax (02) 9228 3935 http://www.premier.nsw.gov.au/contact-premier-new-south-wales Robyn Parker NSW Minister for the Environment, and Minister for Heritage: Phone (+612) 9228 5253 Fax (+612) 9228 5763 [email protected] Victor Dominello NSW Minister for Citizenship and Communities, and Minister for Aboriginal Affairs: Phone (+612) 9228 4333 Fax (+612) 9228 4392 [email protected]
Views: 8570 Wake Up World
Coal Mining Long Service Leave scheme protected by Gillard Govt
 
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Prime Minister Julia Gillard congratulates CFMEU Mining & Energy members on the protection of their Long Service Leave entitlements after the introduction of new legislation.
Views: 192 CFMEUMINING
Dirty Power: Big Coal’s network of influence over the coalition government
 
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Find out more: https://act.greenpeace.org.au/dirtypower We’ve uncovered the web of connections between the world’s biggest coal giants, industry groups, lobbyists and powerful media organisations that serves to halt action on climate change and stall the transition to clean energy. The coal industry has infiltrated Australia’s federal government through a secretive network of ties, working to influence Australia’s political decisions at the highest level: right up to the office of the Prime Minister, Scott Morrison.
Mine expansion in court over climate change impact
 
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Environmental groups are attempting to prove the effects of climate change would be worsened by the expansion of a coal mine at Ulan in the NSW Hunter Valley.
Land & Env court continues hearing objections to New Hope's Acland stage 3 expansion
 
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7/03/2016 Hearing in the Land & Environment court hears objections to New Hope's coal mine stage 3 expansion.
Views: 165 Qldaah
ADP Webinar:  Long Service Leave - New South Wales
 
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How much do you know about Long Service Leave (LSL) in your state or territory? David Bates from Workforce Guardian and Angela Lehmann from ADP will explain everything you need to know about LSL, including: - How LSL accrues - When pro-rata leave entitlements must be provided - Whether LSL can be ‘cashed-in’ - How to calculate LSL entitlements for part-time and casual employees - What happens to LSL when a business changes hands - Tax implications of LSL
Whitehaven Coal opening ceremony of Maules Creek mine - video 1
 
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Video 1 - the opening ceremony of Whitehaven Coal's Maules Creek mine. Maules Creek is already delivering and will continue to deliver substantial economic and social dividends to the surrounding area: • It has created 250 locally based jobs, and when fully ramped it will create another 200 jobs for locals, or workers prepared to move to the area. • It will inject an additional $68 million in wages into the regional economy every single year, supporting retailers and small business owners. • It will contribute over $90 million per year in royalty payments to the New South Wales State Government when the mine is operating ate 13Mtpa ROM coal. • It will contribute $13 million towards local infrastructure upgrades, improving amenity and liveability. • It will contribute an annual payment of approximately $900,000 to the Narrabri Shire Council as part of the Voluntary Planning Agreement with the Council. • It will provide around $150,000 in grants to local education and other charitable initiatives. • It will provide more than 50 indigenous Australians with skills, training and long term employment.
Views: 1206 Whitehaven Coal
SINGLETON 2330 NSW Australia
 
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singleton 2330 NSW
Views: 455 Bai Catherine
Mountain Ash, Glamorgan, Wales (1926)
 
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Miners and their families in the mining towns of the Welsh valleys just before the General Strike of May 1926, an unsuccessful attempt to force the government to act to prevent wage reduction and worsening conditions for coal miners. This extract comes from Claude Friese-Greene's 'The Open Road' - originally filmed in 1925/6 and now re-edited and digitally restored by the BFI National Archive. Britain seen in colour for the first time was heralded as a great technical advance for the cinema audience - now we can view a much improved image, but one which still stays true to the principles of the colour process. The rather haphazard journey from Land's End to John O'Groats creates a series of moving picture postcards. Look out for shots containing the component colours - red and blue-green - such as when a little girl in a red coat and hat walks among peacocks in the grounds of a castle, and three girls with red curly hair pose by the sea at Torquay. The car is a Vauxhall D-type - considered a sporty model at the time. A long-distance journey by car was a relatively new concept, with none of the amenities en route now taken for granted. The visit to a petrol station shows smoking on the forecourt: no health and safety issues back then! The travelogue ends with a series of recognisable London landmarks. Much remains the same - one major exception being the volume of traffic on the roads. (Jan Faull) To buy the DVD click here - http://filmstore.bfi.org.uk/acatalog/info_6406.html All titles on the BFI Films channel are preserved in the vast collections of the BFI National Archive. To find out more about the Archive visit http://www.bfi.org.uk/archive-collections
Views: 24090 BFI
Working with Whitehaven
 
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Employment fair recruiting video for Whitehaven Coal based in Gunnedah NSW Australia
Views: 157 Lindsey Hughson
Activists occupy the world's largest coal port- clipreel
 
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Community members and Greenpeace occupy the world’s largest coal port in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, and display the message “CommBank’s Coal Kills”. Meanwhile, local residents hang out coal-covered clothes and display signs reading “No new mines” and “No New Coal” to highlight the serious health and climate impacts of the Commonwealth Bank’s lending policies. The Commonwealth Bank needs to know that when they sign away money to fossil fuel projects, there are real people who suffer. Stand with communities fighting back against coal: http://act.gp/2raM0qo Lets fight back now, tell big polluters to change their ways now: http://bit.ly/2olbqle
Barry O'Farrell on Assyrian, Armenian & Greek Genocide in NSW Parliament
 
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Liberal Premier, The Hon. Barry O'Farrell MP, moving a motion within the Parliament of NSW Legislative Assembly to recognise the Assyrian, Armenian, and Greek Genocide by the Ottoman Empire. The motion passed unanimously in the house. I thank the Premier and the Parliament, the Genocide was an issue very close to my heart that I had long lobbied for. The motion read: That this House: (1) notes that on 17 April 1997, this House recognised and condemned the Genocide of the Armenians by the then Ottoman Government between 1915 and 1922, and designated 24 April of every year thereafter as a day of remembrance of the 1.5 million Armenians who fell victim to the first genocide of the twentieth century; (2) recognises that Assyrians and Greeks were subjected to qualitatively similar genocides by the then Ottoman Government between 1915 and 1922; (3) reaffirms its condemnation of the genocide of the Assyrians, Armenians and Greeks, and all other acts of genocide as the ultimate act of intolerance; (4) recognises the importance of remembering and learning from such dark chapters in human history to ensure that such crimes against humanity are not allowed to be repeated; (5) acknowledges and pays tribute to the contribution of the Anzac servicemen who aided the survivors of the genocide; and (6) acknowledges the significant humanitarian relief contribution made by the people of New South Wales to the victims and survivors of the genocide. Read the full speech at http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LA20130508009
Views: 3046 AndrewRohanMP
Shenhua - has the Agriculture Minister visited the site? 26 August 2015
 
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Greens MP Jeremy Buckingham asks NSW Agriculture Minister Niall Blair whether he has visited the site of the proposed Shenhua Watermark coal mine in the Liverpool Plains? The Minister avoids answering the question. 26 August 2015 SHENHUA WATERMARK COALMINE Page: 22 Mr JEREMY BUCKINGHAM: My question without notice is directed to the Minister for Primary Industries, and Minister for Lands and Water. Has the Minister toured the site of the proposed Shenhua Watermark coalmine? What impact will the mine have on the water resources and agricultural productivity of the Liverpool Plains? The Hon. NIALL BLAIR: New South Wales has the most rigorous assessment process for mining developments in the country. The development assessment process for major projects is based on an assessment of the merits of each individual project proposed. The level of impact assessment and review is commensurate with the potential risks posed by the project. In addition, the decision-maker has the power to impose conditions on a project approval to constrain the way activities are undertaken on a site, or to require the impacts to be monitored so they can be measured and verified. In recognition of the Liverpool Plains as a productive agricultural region, the Shenhua Watermark exploration licence application includes a special condition, the purpose of which is to ensure that the most fertile agricultural lands are protected from mining. Application of strategic regional land use policy to the watermark project has resulted in large distances between the mine and the black soil plains and the primary alluvial aquifer; relocation of the project's biodiversity offset areas to avoid strategic agricultural land; preparation of detailed agricultural impact assessments reviewed by the Gateway Panel; and a suite of conditions to ensure that the water and agricultural resources of the region are protected. During the New South Wales based assessment of Shenhua's development application, a number of independent groundwater experts reviewed the groundwater modelling. The reviews found that the mine would not have a significant impact on groundwater and, in particular, the high value alluvial aquifers. The Shenhua project has also been subject to further scrutiny at the Commonwealth level under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Mr Jeremy Buckingham: Point of order: My point of order is relevance. My question asked if the Minister had toured the proposed site. The Hon. John Ajaka: That was only part of the question. Mr Jeremy Buckingham: It was a key part, it was the first part. The Hon. Duncan Gay: To the point of order: That was not the only part of the question. The substantial part of the question dealt with the water and that is the answer that is being given. Mr Jeremy Buckingham: Further to the point of order: I would argue that the substantial part of my question was whether the Minister for Primary Industries in New South Wales has visited the proposed site of the Shenhua Watermark. I think an answer in that regard is most relevant. The PRESIDENT: Order! Mr Jeremy Buckingham has made a debating through the point of order, which is what it was. The Minister was quite in order. In what particular order the Minister chooses to answer a question or whether he chooses to answer a question at all is not a matter on which the President can intervene. As long as the Minister is providing relevant information and is not debating the question then he is in order, and the Minister was doing neither of those things. The Hon. NIALL BLAIR: The advice from the Independent Expert Scientific Committee confirmed that the groundwater model and supporting information is appropriate, and found that it is more likely to overestimate than underestimate impacts to high-value water sources. This Government is committed to the sustainable management of its groundwater resources, and the regulatory framework it has introduced around the mining and gas industries in New South Wales will ensure the necessary level of protection. The PRESIDENT: Order! Mr Jeremy Buckingham and the Hon. Dr Peter Phelps will cease interjecting. The honourable member is skating on very thing ice.
Views: 33 Jeremy Buckingham
The Mine Subsidence Board - Enquiries
 
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The Mine Subsidence Board is a service organisation operating for the community in coal mining areas of New South Wales, Australia, and is responsible for administering the Mine Subsidence Compensation Act. Our mission is to mitigate the effects of mine subsidence on the community by promoting compatibility between surface developments and underground coal mining, restoring damaged improvements and managing the compensation fund. for more information visit our website www.minesub.nsw.gov.au
Views: 115 MineSubBoard
Greens NSW lodge protest against poles and wires lease legislation
 
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On the 4th of June, the Greens lodged a formal protest with the Governor of NSW regarding the adoption of the Baird government's bills to lease 49% of the poles and wires electricity infrastructure. The bill passed the NSW Legislative Council on the 3rd of June of with the support of Christian Democratic MP Fred Nile. Read more at www.johnkaye.org.au
Views: 32 John Kaye