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Where Can I Find Gold In Nevada? (USGS Gold Map survey)
 
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Where can you find gold in Nevada? Watch this and see where gold can be found in Nevada using the USGS gold maps and a generous scoop of desert sands. For more details about how to find gold go to https://SourdoughMiner.com/GDU/ Watch to see where to start Gold Prospecting in Nevada.
Views: 1170 Prospector Jess
Old Cars & Giant Stopes At This Nevada Tungsten Mine
 
18:20
Tungsten mines never seem to disappoint and this abandoned tungsten mine in Nevada is no exception… The old cars and trucks on the way in were just a nice bonus! This mine delivers a fantastic wooden headframe, impressive woodwork underground and ballroom-sized stopes. The last record of production here was in 1963, which is actually somewhat later than most tungsten mines that we have visited. World War II triggered a huge rush for tungsten, but the momentum for this boom ran out in the 1950s and the majority of tungsten mines closed during that decade. It is a shame that the lower levels of this mine were flooded as, if the rest was any indication, I’m sure they are impressive as well. Unfortunately, I was unable to locate a map of the underground workings that we could not access. That’s a very dry part of Nevada and so I was somewhat surprised by the amount of water present. Well, actually, I should say that I THOUGHT that was a very dry part of Nevada. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 22254 TVR Exploring
An Unusual Gold Mine In Nevada
 
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In this video, I endeavor to spare you, my dear viewers, from having to make the long drive to the middle of nowhere in Nevada (along with the associated costs for fuel and damage to your vehicle on the rough road in). In addition, you are able to avoid the relatively long, hot hike up to this abandoned mine. And, of course, you are also spared from needing to spend any time underground in this sketchy abandoned mine as well. Now don’t get me wrong, we (usually) enjoy this sort of thing, but most probably would not… The mineral potential of this area was first recognized in the mid-1800s and a town and mill sprang up around the areas in the canyon that looked most promising very shortly thereafter. However, no one appears to have gotten rich here and (as with countless mining towns) everything slowly faded away, interspersed with only brief flurries of activity when new discoveries or economic conditions temporarily brought miners out into the hills again. There are surprisingly few records available on this specific mine. Although it is mentioned that work took place here in the 1930s, the only years that we could find production data for were for two years in the 1940s. This was primarily a gold mine, but some silver was extracted here as well. The official production figures were not terribly inspiring, but it seems that contemporary mining companies still poke around this site from time to time – even in those small, fractured stopes underground as could be seen from the surveyor’s flags... Although samples have been taken, to my knowledge, no modern exploratory work has been conducted. My exploring buddy on this trip was Mines of the West: https://www.youtube.com/user/GramVideos95 ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 70168 TVR Exploring
NEVADA Publications | Treasure Hunters Guide | Ghost Town Maps
 
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(775) 747-0800 Ghost Town Maps, Ghost Town Maps, Nevada Publications http://www.NevadaPulicationsOnline.com When you want to learn about Nevada Ghost Towns or Death Valley Ghost Towns, you go to the source of all the best Old West books at Nevada Publications. The Owner and author of most of the library of books about the Ghost Towns in Nevada, Stanley W. Paher is the man and place to go. You can call up Stan Paher and talk to him in person at 1-775-747-0800 and ask him any questions on Nevada Ghost Towns. You might even get him to sign one of his books for you if you just ask. be sure to subscribe to my channel to keep updated on Nevada Publications. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztovElSk9fM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rdQqX9t8tY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e1rzV0sGYQ Las Vegas, As It Began — As It Grew, Death Valley Ghost Towns, Alice’s Drive, Alkali Angels, The Modern Pioneers of Amargosa Valley, More Than A Song And A Dance, My Adventures With Your Money, A Naturalist’s Death Valley, Mining Districts and Mineral Resources, Nevada Adventure Map, Nevada Ghost Towns & Mining Camps, Nevada Ghost Towns & Desert Atlas, Nevada Passport, Nevada Post Offices: An Illustrated History, Pahrump, A Valley Waiting, Peep at Washoe: Sketches of Virginia City
Views: 673 Nevada Publications
Secret Miner’s Cabin & Mines In The Sierra Nevada - Part 1
 
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Probably less than a dozen people know about the historic miner’s cabin hidden away on this mining claim - and even fewer still know about the abundance of gold mines found here… It remains a secret because the people that do know where this is remain tight-lipped about it and this cabin and mines are located in an absolute black hole on topographic and other maps. There is simply nothing marked anywhere near here. With the contractors for the Forest Service, BLM, Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) programs, et al working overtime (with taxpayer money) to get all of these historic mines erased, it is very nice to be introduced to some gold mines that are not (currently) in danger of being permanently closed. It is a shame that we have to wallow in such secrecy simply to protect a historically significant site from the very entities that should be preserving it, but such is the upside down world we live in. The two adits featured in this video appear to be quite old. I was able to find a couple of references to the mines consolidated on this claim in mining journals dating back to the turn of the last century and they were described as already having been worked for a while at that time. So, initial work here probably dates back to around the time of California’s “Gold Rush” era. The earliest gold miners in California were placer miners. However, when the easy pickings from the surface were worked out, they became lode miners and headed underground to start chasing the veins where the gold in the creeks originated from (some underground miners also chased the rich placer left behind by ancient river channels that were buried millions of years ago). The little hole by the creek under the huge boulder would have been referred to as a “coyote hole” by the miners of the time. These were in abundance along the creeks and rivers of California in the early days as the miners pursued gold flakes and nuggets back into the rocks and gravel lining the waterways. So, it seems likely that the small adit we visited first would have been the one developed initially and then the larger adit punching into the hard rock would have come along later. In further support of the idea that these mines are older rather than newer is that, although it may possibly have been there at one point, there was no sign of rail at the mines we visited. The claim owner also stated that he has never seen any sign of rail here either. It is not difficult to imagine a swarm of miners crawling all over these canyon walls like ants during the “Gold Rush” era, churning up the creeks and digging out coyote holes. This initial surge of miners, however, would have been followed by a more patient, more sophisticated group of miners that had an eye on heading underground. At the second adit shown in this video, for example, you could have had something like a father and son team or two brothers slowly working away at that lode mine for years, chasing those quartz veins and hauling load after load of ore and waste rock out in wheelbarrows. I’m giving more of a general feel for the area with these videos rather than showing every single bit of mining history present as both sides of this canyon are covered in mines and the remains of mining equipment. We’ll see more of that in the next video. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines that I have explored: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 98514 TVR Exploring
The Mine Where Everyone Missed
 
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While accurate, the title demands an explanation… Yes, everyone missed here. As you’ll see in this, and subsequent videos, this is a failed placer mine. The many gold miners that worked here were desperately searching for the ancient river channels that so many other mines in the mining district had tapped into with immense success. In their search for those gold-filled channels, the miners at this mine explored underground to the right, left, up and down within the claim boundaries. However, quite simply, they missed… Fortunately, their efforts make for a quite unique and interesting abandoned mine. Then, Adit Addicts and I arrived at this mine site. We had a verbal description of where the adit was and even a fairly precise location from a topographic map. After looking all over the place for this adit on multiple visits, but failing to locate it, we eventually concluded that it had eroded shut and been lost forever. However, quite simply, we missed… Following the visits from Adit Addicts and me, our pals in the U.S. Forest arrived on the scene and, to their eternal disgrace, they have succeeded in mostly destroying this historic mine. They THINK they have completely destroyed it. However, quite simply, they missed… Well, they missed this adit - which is the main adit at the mine. Finally, Adit Addicts, on a return trip over the winter, did NOT miss. It was through a stroke of luck that he was able to locate this adit, but locate it he did. To be fair to the miners, to us and, yes, even to the Forest Service, this is not an easy mine to locate or one that presents easy working conditions… To say that we were surprised by how extensive this mine turned out to be would be a huge understatement. I have to be careful in sharing much information on this one as I do not want the Forest Service to return and finish their destruction. However, it is very interesting to look at the ownership records of this mine as it changed hands over and over again as one disillusioned miner after another apparently dumped it on the next sucker. Also, as was alluded to in our conversation inside of the mine about the Chinese miners, quite a diverse array of ethnic groups mined here. I’d love to give more details. Perhaps one day we will have more enlightened governance and I can share so much more about the abandoned mines we visit… So, I promised to talk about the “strips” I am constantly referencing on what look like rails… Traditional rails, whether they are for trains or ore carts, are heavy and expensive. Thus, for miners operating on a budget in locations that are difficult to reach, a lighter and cheaper alternative ranks high on their wish list. From this, were born wooden “rails.” The miners would take sturdy boards (lighter and cheaper) and lay these down in the same configuration as rails. They would then take thin strips of metal (some people call them straps) and would nail these down on top of the boards. The boards are not as sturdy or as smooth as rail, but they get the job done. The metal strips on top of the boards are to protect the wood from being immediately destroyed by the metal ore cart wheels. One will often see those metal strips scattered around old mines as the boards and strips had to be replaced often. I’ll talk more about what exactly the miners missed in the next video as well as how painfully close they were… The link to the next video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keSl6y2b6nI The YouTube channel for Adit Addicts can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIXOU8aR7o50X6q2wQ0wbCQ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 204550 TVR Exploring
Exploring A High Sierra Placer And Lode Mine: Part 2 of 2
 
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As I mentioned in the description section of the first video in this series, this mine got a lot less pleasant in the second half of it! Flooding, low oxygen, monsters popping up out of the water, etc. presented quite the mix of negative experiences… Perhaps the only thing that was not an issue was ground fall (sections where the mine caved). The exception, of course, is the point at which I could not continue any farther where all of that rock and dirt went to the very top of the adit. However, as you undoubtedly noticed with the other ore chutes/ore passes/raises in this mine, a fair amount of gravel and dirt was at the base of each of those that had tumbled down from the upper workings. So, I don’t know that that caved section at the end was a failure in the main haulage adit or if that was a lot of material that had come down from the upper workings through an ore pass/ore chute/raise. Unless someone steps forward with a map, we may never know. Based on prior experience though, I am somewhat inclined toward believing that all of that material came down from the upper workings rather than from the hard rock that this adit consisted of giving way. The oxygen levels definitely became disagreeably low as I continued to push in. You heard how hard I was working for oxygen toward the end of exploring the underground portion of the mine… One probably wouldn’t want to flirt with oxygen levels much lower than that for very long (and that is certainly a good example of why it is likely in any mine explorer’s best interest to fork out the money for an oxygen meter). I was really hoping to discover a way into those upper workings, but the miners cut in way, way below the ancient river channel here and so it was quite a distance to reach the higher levels (In this case, it proved to be an insurmountable distance). I understand that it is difficult to precisely hit the ancient river channels that the miners want to pull the gold out of and there are many examples of gold mines where the miners punched in too high or too low. So, for this mine, I don’t know if it was a slight miscalculation that brought the miners in so far beneath the placer or if it was intentional for some reason I cannot fathom. I thought that all of the artifacts around the remains of the miner’s bunkhouse were extremely interesting. You viewers are pretty savvy – any guesses as to the rough age of the stuff around the bunkhouse? Obviously, there was some work done at this mine in the 1980’s given what was written with the white paint in the main haulage adit (and, presumably, the aluminum ladders date to that time as well), but the bunkhouse was abandoned well before then. The last really serious work at this mine that is mentioned in various mining journals and reports was done in the 1950’s. Of course, that doesn’t mean that it couldn’t have already been abandoned by then too, but that seems a lot closer to an accurate estimate. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy it. This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 16787 TVR Exploring
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 1
 
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Consistent with its status as one of the biggest abandoned mines in Nevada, it requires a hike of thousands of feet and a significant elevation decline just to get down to where the underground workings really begin at this massive mine… As can be seen near the start of this video, there are twin portals and passages running parallel down to the underground workings. Our guess was that this was because one passage was for traffic entering the mine and the other for traffic departing the mine. Deep underneath the mountain, the passages converge on a main hub from which drifts branch out in all directions. At the heart of this hub is a breakroom and a large workshop. A large drift takes off to the right from the workshop, while to the left a drift meanders away and another passage descends deeper into the bowels of the mountain. In this first video, we explore the hub of the mine as well as the workings taking off to the left from the hub. Following the descending passage, we were eventually blocked by flooding as the mine workings continue deep beneath the water level inside of the mine. One can only imagine how many miles of workings are under those dark waters. Fortunately, the other main drift taking off to the left was on a slight upward incline and so the water drained down and (mostly) out. With the miles of underground workings at this abandoned mine stretching well into the double digits, one might expect there to be quite a lot of information available on this site. However, that is not the case. There is surprisingly little information to be found online and the various government agencies involved with this site have done a pretty thorough job of scrubbing references to it from their public databases. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 100021 TVR Exploring
Gold Mining in Gold Canyon, Nevada 2019
 
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A follow-up tutorial video for gold mining techniques you can use in Gold Canyon, Nevada.
Views: 2303 callmeBe
Interesting Underground Gold Mine Stuffed With Quartz
 
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This gold mine is one of those abandoned mines that didn’t look like much at first, but ended up being really interesting… Aside from the complexity of the underground workings we explored, we just kept finding stuff. Well, more accurately, I should say that my exploring buddy kept finding stuff. While I was inside the first adit looking around, Mr. McBride, discovered the lower adit and the buildings above the mine workings. Unfortunately, I don’t know anything about the history of this mine. As with many things, California is behind other states in digitizing the records in their archives. By contrast, Nevada is fantastic in this respect. The Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology and the University of Nevada in Reno have done a really impressive job of digitizing and organizing their records online. So, for example, if you have the name of a mine, you can look through their database and find extensive records and maps for the mine you’re curious about. Obviously, not every historic mine is included in their database, but most are. Even without knowing the history though, it is apparent that this mine is an older mine that was worked off and on for quite a while. It also doesn’t seem to be a big stretch to assume that a respectable amount of gold was extracted. I’m basing that on the size of the workings and how the miners burrowed off in all directions from that quartz core where the pit was. They even went down and ran another adit in... Actually, as I was typing that, I realized that it may have been the other way around. If you’ll recall, the track in the lower adit was the “budget rail” where the miners nailed the metal strips onto boards to run the ore carts over. Since the track in the first adit I entered was solid metal rail, it would suggest the possibility that the miners may have done well enough in the lower adit to afford to splash out on expensive rail when driving a second adit above. In other words, the lower adit may have been the first adit. The mine buildings just above the underground workings were interesting to us given their age. The main building looked just large enough to accommodate a crew of approximately the size of the number of names on the board where the miners would badge in and badge out. It’s possible a mining crew could have worked this operation in the winter, but given its remote location, fairly poor dirt roads and heavy snowfall in the winter, it seems more likely this was a summer mining operation. Was that a grave at the end? What do you guys think that was? ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 80782 TVR Exploring
Exploring An Old Civil War, Abandoned Gold Mine - Nelson, Nevada
 
10:04
My son and I like to explore old gold mines outside Nelson, Nevada. This area was mined from 1859 until 1945. Deserters from the Civil War even worked these mines. Don't bring small children or your pets out here -- it is extremely dangerous. Use common sense, a good flashlight, hiking boots, and bring your lunch. Leave your spray paint at home and help protect our history. But most important - BE SAFE!
Views: 14716 mixup98
Incredibly Rare Wooden Ore Cart Found Inside A Mine!
 
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Well, we certainly don’t come across something like this every day when we’re out exploring… Just like the abandoned steam engine we featured in another video, this is one of those incredible once in a lifetime finds. There are precious few of these wooden ore carts left in existence and even fewer that can still be found at an abandoned mine rather than rotting away in someone’s backyard. Fortunately, this mine is not marked on any topographic maps and it is in a very remote area of the desert. I believe this is what has protected it from the vermin that ransack these sites to sell the historical artifacts on eBay. Were it not for these circumstances, the wooden ore cart would have undoubtedly disappeared a long time ago. We have found bits and pieces of the metal frames of wooden ore carts in and around some of the old (1800s) mines in California’s “Mother Lode” region. So, obviously, they were used there. However, the wood has long since rotted away and whatever was left of the abandoned carts has disintegrated with time and exposure to the elements. If you consider it, wooden ore carts actually made a lot of sense for the miners in the past that were venturing out over steep mountains and down deep canyons, often over little more than primitive trails. Rather than needing to use a team of mules to haul a backbreakingly heavy metal ore cart up a sheer cliff to a mine, the miners could have hauled out the relatively lightweight (except for the wheels) components and then assembled the carts from the plentiful trees growing around the mine. And, as was mentioned in the video, if something breaks, the miners could just cut another tree down and repair the cart. From the look of it, the wooden ore cart at this mine in the video may have likewise been constructed from the trees found around the mine. As for the mine itself, which was almost an afterthought for me after finding the wooden ore cart, it wasn’t a huge mine, but I thought it was an interesting little mine all the same, no? The flickering effect created by the LEDs on the video drove me nuts when I was editing it, but focusing on the features of the mine, I liked the way the mine twisted around until it reached that small raise and the winze. Given how clean this first section of the mine was, I can only conclude that that section is the one that was worked most recently and the area behind the skip car (where the rails for the ore carts disappeared) was driven during the early days of the mine and then abandoned. I don’t blame the miners for abandoning that section of the mine given how soft the material there was. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 213348 TVR Exploring
A Trip To the Kolcheck Mine. White Pine County, Nevada
 
21:43
A real neat off road Journey to a old mine called the Kolcheck In White Pine County in the state of Nevada. The Location for the mine is: 39° 14' 27" N x 114° 37' 37" W. Find that on your GPS and a Good Topo map and that should get you right to the mine. The route you choose is up to you. I am neither endorsing or non-recommending the road that we took. Just remember, if your vehicle breaks down you are a long way from anything and I couldn't determine the last time a vehicle had been up this road. The road is in fairly good shape to the old miners cabin except for the 3 water crossings. The road gets much worse after that. I will let you decide what you and your vehicle a capable of.
Views: 1728 Kevin Dellinger
Small Abandoned Mine And Cabins In The High Sierras
 
08:02
This abandoned mine and cabins do not appear on any maps and so I stumbled across it by accident on my way to explore another mine. The site is located in a steep canyon that ultimately drops down to California's Feather River. Unfortunately, I don't know anything about the history of this long abandoned mine or even its name. The second cabin was obviously considerably older than the first one...
Views: 4494 TVR Exploring
Incredible Nevada Silver Mine  - Part 5
 
25:40
We’re at the end of this series now... If you’ve made it through all five of these videos, I thank you for watching and I’m going to assume that you saw why we enjoyed this abandoned mine so much. With some mines, there is a feeling of relief to get outside again into the open skies and fresh air. However, I actually find myself reluctant to leave mines such as this one or the Buca della Vena Mine in Italy. Sure, we’re usually tired after a day of scrambling through the different levels, but they are really fun to explore and after seeing so many amazing things, one is reluctant to leave the party early. As you probably gathered, this is not the last level in this mine, but this is as far as we could go on this trip. There was no way we could have gotten up those soggy, rotten ladders running up the side of that shaft or winze (I still don’t know if that was a winze or a capped shaft). You saw how many rungs were missing and by the point we arrived, those ladders were essentially mush. Speaking of rotten things… How did you like that false floor hanging out over that huge open space? I thought it was pretty cool to be able to look back on that and to see what the platform looked like underneath. It isn’t often that one is able to get a perspective like that. And I’m glad I didn’t go out on it because that would not have been a pleasant ride! I’m also glad we were able to gain additional views down into the huge cave as well. I don’t know if you noticed or not, but at one of those openings I showed down into the cave, you could see ore cart rail jutting out a little bit into the opening. That was one of the points where the miners were dumping the waste rock into the cave. As great as it was to see more of the enormous cave, I think my favorite thing on this upper level was that sign displaying the “Mine Hoist Signal Code.” It is very rare to find intact signs like that. First of all, not many mines are big enough to even have one in the first place. Secondly, the wet or flooded mines will soon cause a sign like that to rot away to nothing. And, lastly, although they might be preserved in the dry, desert mines, those are some of the first mine relics to disappear into the backpacks of “collectors.” So, it is a treat to see one still in place where it belongs. It took us a full day to explore the section of this mine that you saw in this series of five videos, but that is far from the whole mine. I’ve spoken with an individual that knows this mine very well and has seen far more of it than we have. According to him (which is supported by the maps I have seen), we saw only approximately 20% of this abandoned mine in this series. Imagine a series of 25-30 videos that it would have taken to cover this one mine! We haven’t been in many mines that are that big… Really, there aren’t many mines that ARE that big. I haven’t posted them yet, but I actually still have two mine series to publish that are also of enormous mines like this. I think you’ll like those... ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 30023 TVR Exploring
Exploring A Remote Mine And Miner's Cabin In The Desert
 
21:26
Remote! This abandoned mine and miner’s cabin is WAY out in the Nevada desert. Come along with us on this adventure to see the treasures that can, fortunately, still be found hidden away in our world... Highway 50 running through Nevada is said to be “The Loneliest Road” in America. Well, to get to this abandoned mine, you have to turn off of the loneliest road and go down an even more lonely dirt road for many miles. Then, you have to turn off of that lonely dirt road onto another dirt road, that seems to be not much more than an animal trail, and go on that for several miles before finally arriving near enough to this mine to be able to walk up to it. Pretty lonely! We are frequently amazed by the ability of the old time prospectors to locate promising mineral deposits in the most remote and inhospitable places. This mine proved to be no exception. I simply cannot imagine how the miners in the past decided to start running an adit at this site. Interestingly, they punched straight back for several hundred feet before the adit abruptly stops at a “T” junction. There was a small drift and stope on the left, but on the right (taking off at a sharp angle of 90 degrees from the adit we came in on) was another drift heading off deeper into the mountain. This drift continues for several hundred feet more before coming to a chamber where the miners created a fairly large stope and also pursued the ore down through the floor of the adit. Perhaps the bits of wood down in the small pit they created are what is left of a trestle that used to run across this spot? After making our way across the small pit, the drift meandered around until we came to a large ore chute leading up into what must be upper workings of a respectable size. In the video, you can see why I believe these may connect to the outside world. After the ore chute, the historic mine bends around some more before finally simply stopping at a rock face. I don’t know what encouraged the miners to suddenly branch off from the initial adit at the sharp right angle, but this was apparently a good call given the stopes and ore chute that indicate they took some sort of valuable mineral out of there. The miner’s cabin did not have any type of road leading up to it. We continued hiking up the mountain above the mine in order to look for the presumed outside access to the upper workings that we saw extending up from the ore chute inside of the mine. We did not find the breach to the outside world (or the inside world depending on your perspective) that we were seeking, but the vegetation was fairly thick in the most likely areas. Forgive us, but we did not push too aggressively into some of these spots as we had no desire to be blindly thrashing our way through the thick brush only to take a tumble down a shaft or open stope. Instead, we kept exploring up the mountain because we were enjoying the views and were curious about what might be in such an area that sees so very few humans. After hiking for a while, I noticed the remains of a very faint trail leading down a little side canyon or dry wash. I already knew that we were going to be hiking back down to the mine in the dark anyway, so I decided to follow the trail for a little ways. I soon discovered that the trail had been created by miners in the past as I came across the old miner’s cabin and the small prospect next to it. That was a real treat as, obviously, very few people know it is there and so it still had a large number of artifacts around, which allowed us to really understand what the lonely life of the miner there must have been like. We hiked down in the dark and drove out in the dark (which wasn’t easy), but it was worth it to explore this mine and to see the forgotten miner’s cabin. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 53099 TVR Exploring
Gold mines in Goldfield, Nevada (SCARY DEEP) 20 mines found!!!
 
23:33
Filmed on 3-11-17. Sorry, but the first, and last part of the video got ruined. I dropped my camera, and broke it. Sean, and I take you through Goldfield mining district. This is just a fraction of the abandoned mines in Goldfield. Though some of the largest, and biggest producer's of gold in the world. We take right up close, and show you how close they are to each other. In 1906 Goldfield, Nevada had a population of around 30,000 residents. It was the most populated city in Nevada at the time. They were going to move the capital of Nevada to Goldfield. As the gold dwindled away so did the thought of making Goldfield the capital. Please enjoy, and thanks for watching. Christian
High Grade Gold Left In Old Mines & Finding Loads Of Vuggy Quartz Veins
 
14:14
High grade gold from mineralized samples taken at a couple gold mines on our mineral property and finding loads of vuggy quartz veins all over the claim. Our goal this trip was to mainly search for possible areas were we can perform detailed geochemical sampling. The purpose is to locate new deposits as well as locate two old lost mineshafts with promising reserves. Hope everyone enjoys the video and stay tuned for more! This video was made possible by our patrons support! Thank you to all our supporters! Here is the link: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/911mining Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/911mining Website: www.911mining.com Business Inquiries: [email protected] Thank you and happy gold mining! 911 Mining & Prospecting Co
Views: 1028991 911 Mining & Prospecting
Exploring The Dangerous Rabbit's Paw Mine
 
34:09
Another one of many old mines in the mining district of Sandon. I almost get trapped in this one lucky to make it out alive!
How To Find Abandoned Mines
 
31:22
So, you want to know how to find a specific abandoned mine or abandoned mines in general? We will dive into answering that question in this video by taking you along on our search for an abandoned mine that took us two years to locate! Along the way you’ll have the opportunity to observe the tools and techniques we use to find the historic mines that appear in our videos and you will, hopefully, be able to incorporate some of what we have learned over the years (and are now sharing with you) into your own search for mines and mine sites. I will cover how we find out about mines in the first place, the research that we do, the online resources we utilize, the technology we take out in the field with us and more. Whether you are a historian or a gold miner looking for promising sites to file claims on or a mine explorer interested in documenting our industrial heritage or are just curious what is around the area where you live, this video will, hopefully, have something useful for you. Some of you will obviously already know many, if not all, of these search techniques. However, this video is intended to have something for everyone – from the novice to the experienced mine hunter. Many people have no interest at all in finding lost mines, but enjoying seeing them and the efforts of others to find them, and so I have included the footage of the mine when we finally found it for that demographic as well. Fortunately, we don’t normally have to work this hard to find an abandoned mine, but if our search for this mine, although quite unpleasant and frustrating at times, was useful to someone else out there, then it was worth it. Happy hunting! Here are the links for the websites mentioned in this video: https://thediggings.com/ caltopo.com http://www.mylandmatters.org/ http://www.westernmininghistory.com/ https://www.google.com/earth/ https://goldrushexpeditions.com/ ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 21701 TVR Exploring
Detonating 100 year old dynamite in the Monarch mine
 
26:49
We return the Phoenix and find the long lost connector to the Monarch mine from the Rawhide/ Gold Drop. In the Monarch we find a case of dynamite from 1918 and blow it up!
We Found An Abandoned Town Hidden in the Arizona Mountains.
 
20:14
This was probably my favorite place to explore ever. Hidden in the Arizona mountains sets Ruby, AZ the most well preserved ghost towns to exist.Also i hate that i must say this however the town was abandoned in the 40's but it was founded over 150 years ago making a 200 + year old town. So before you comment understand that. Subscribe to Tim. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKRhTLMBV6dU74IvbO8SEJw patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4575018 spreadshirt: https://www.spreadshirt.com/user/301932432 Mail: P.O. Box 71031 Knoxville, TN 37938 Professional Inquires: [email protected] instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Exploration__Unknown/ twitter: https://twitter.com/explor8tion1 facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/134993677132723
Views: 1569969 Exploration Unknown
Exploring One Of The Biggest Abandoned Mines In Nevada: Part 2
 
18:26
After exploring what was possible to explore (or that we were willing to explore) off to the left side of the main hub of this gigantic mine, we made our way back over to explore the right side. This meant heading down the large passage taking off from the underground workshop… The number of drifts and inclines fanning out in all directions was staggering and we had to stay focused in order to maintain some order in our exploring. Fortunately, we were able to get into areas of open stoping (with natural support) on this side of the mine and to see some of the minerals the miners were seeking. Additionally, on several occasions, we were able to look up to (or down to) different levels in this mine, suggesting that the underground workings were even greater than we had already imagined. Interestingly, this side of the abandoned mine was in far better shape than the other side and we encountered hardly any water. I should mention that with this mine I have edited many, many hours of exploring down to a manageable clip that shows the noteworthy features, but spares my dear viewers the tedious viewing of us walking, walking, walking and walking some more (and then walking some more) down miles of featureless drifts. The primary mineral extracted at this mine was zinc, but copper, lead, silver and even molybdenum, among other minerals, were recovered as well. Headframe Hunters, who was kind enough to do some research on this mine for us, had the following to share on the geology of the mine: “It was a mid-grade zinc mine - the primary zinc ore type mined is sphalerite (zinc sulfide, commonly called jack), which explains the acid mine drainage and hydrogen sulfide you encountered. The deposit is probably an igneous-hosted hydrothermal vein-type deposit; a limestone-hosted MVT like we have in Missouri would have buffered out all the acid.” Ultimately, this mine closed due to a period of low zinc prices rather than because the mine was played out. There are actually a significant quantity of valuable minerals still underground at this abandoned mine. * Thank you to Headframe Hunters and Mines of the West for the information they were able to dredge up on this abandoned mine * ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L If you like these videos on exploring abandoned mines, please subscribe! https://goo.gl/yjPxH1 Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, guess what? We have fun doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a hundred years, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 41532 TVR Exploring
Blue Gem Turquoise Mining Claim - Nevada - 2017
 
03:33
The Blue Gem, also known as the Easter Blue Mine, is located in the heart of the Royston Mining District, which is known for its production of highly valued turquoise.
Detecting Gold in Nevada
 
21:31
With a metal detector in hand Gary heads out to find gold in the Nevada desert. He explains the technics that have worked well over the years. My Store - https://honans-mining-supplies.myshopify.com/ Web site; http://www.goldminingbasics.com/ My ebay store: http://stores.ebay.com/Honans-Mining-and-Diving-Supplies?_trksid=p2047675.l2563 Estwing GP18 Gad Pry Bar, I never go prospecting without this bar = https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000E7PFFE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B000E7PFFE&linkCode=as2&tag=twotoesadvent-20&linkId=b881108ddd3334ab7bcec81cfc7bf0d1 Estwing 14 oz. Rock Pick Hammer https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002YWCIM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B0002YWCIM&linkCode=as2&tag=twotoesadvent-20&linkId=1c081ceeb4325eb37e97f3ff083f1cc6Estwing 22 oz. Rock Pick Hammer = https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002OVCMO/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B0002OVCMO&linkCode=as2&tag=twotoesadvent-20&linkId=3e5e8df494dddd420ebfef136ccbf7e5" 22 oz. Rock Pick Hammer long handle = https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004F7JCBC/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B004F7JCBC&linkCode=as2&tag=twotoesadvent-20&linkId=8844b7483304d0d68e679b93c5ba2b1f"\ My favorite headphones; https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002V2XX4U/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B002V2XX4U&linkCode=as2&tag=twotoesadvent-20&linkId=92f18547e36d937e6d7b9ad99993020b Detector used Nugget Hunting; https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06X9366BJ/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B06X9366BJ&linkCode=as2&tag=twotoesadvent-20&linkId=64ecf71359725495c8e5d444a8be5105" Detector used Treasure Hunting; https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B2B4NVI/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B00B2B4NVI&linkCode=as2&tag=twotoesadvent-20&linkId=a02576aee89f78402a16fcc96cdedfde Business contact: [email protected]
Views: 95338 Two Toes
Exploring The Abandoned Volcano Mine -  Pioche, Nevada
 
23:31
This video describes our exploration of the Volcano Mine near Pioche, Nevada the way it was on 10-16 -2018. The Volcano Mine is a silver, lead and manganese mine that has a deep main shaft and extensive underground workings. There is a substantial head frame and ore bin that was used to hoist the ore out of the mine and load it on to trucks to be hauled to a mill. There is a building still standing that housed the machinery used to run the hoist and to supply the air and water that the miners needed. There are a few other shafts nearby that were dug as well as the main shaft. I don't advise anyone to enter this mine, or any other mine, as doing so can mean a high risk of bodily harm to yourself. Feel free to ask any questions you may have or to leave a comment. Thanks for watching!
Views: 444 Tom Wigren
Return to the Rachel Lincoln Mine: Going Deeper Into the Mine
 
08:12
The Rachel Lincoln Mine was a massive tungsten mine that ceased operations in the 1980s. Left behind are miles and miles of abandoned mine tunnels spanning many levels that are interconnected with raises and winzes and stopes. This was my second time exploring this mine, and we reached some new areas deep underground. The Rachel Lincoln Mine was our final stop on our six-day mine exploration trip. After leaving this mine, we spent a well-deserved overnight stay in Las Vegas before returning to California. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundExploration #RachelNevada
Return to the Lida Mountain Mine
 
08:03
This was my second exploration of the Lida Mountain Mine in Nevada. My initial visit was last December where I explored the lower levels. I knew that there were upper levels in this mine, so I made it a point to return this past week. The upper adit that was marked on my topographic map turned out to be a small, 6-foot deep prospect tunnel. The vertical shafts marked on my topo map turned out to be filled in with boulders, etc.. I began to hike across the mountain looking for other entrances that weren't on my topo map. Sure enough, I spied a large tailings pile down the mountain. I made my way down there and found an adit into the upper workings! This adit, by the way, was also NOT marked on my topo maps. Very often the topo maps are not totally accurate. It pays to do some bushwhacking and scouting around on one's own to find access points for a mine that's as large as this one is. Inside the upper levels, I found an open stope leading to the outside (an unmapped open stope that I had found earlier in the day while hiking on the mountain) as well as winzes leading to lower levels. At the end of this video, there is a demonstration of my personal SPOT beacon. The beacon is a definite must-have when in remote areas with no cell phone signal.
Loneliest Road in America #3: Old copper-mining Ely - Robinson Summit - Eureka, Nevada 2016-06-05
 
01:13:32
This segment of the loneliest road in America from copper mining town Ely to copper mining town Eureka showcases lush early-summer valleys in the midst of Nevada's desert between two mountain ranges and mountain passes. Map of this drive: https://goo.gl/maps/mDqhnyjbgp52 Video time points: 1:05 US 50 west 4:00 Entering downtown Ely 10:15 Ruth turnoff 10:30 Eureka 72; Austin 142, Carson City 313 19:43 Robinson Summit (Egan Range) 7,607 feet / 2,319 m 30:30 Eureka 46; Austin 117, Carson City 288 31:40 Pause east of Little Antelope Summit 31:46-32:23 Egan Range & White River Valley to east 37:35 Ilipah (ghost town) & Hamilton turnoff 41:01 Eureka 37, Fallon 218, Reno 277 42:32 Little Antelope Summit (White Pine Range) 7,438 feet / 2,267 m 54:04 Pancake Summit 6,517 feet / 1,986 m Pancake Range https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_50_in_Nevada 1:00:30 Junction SR 892 1:03:58 Eureka city limit 1:04:05 Diamond Mountains https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_Mountains 1:04:09 SR 379 turnoff 1:08:18 Pinto Summit (Diamond Mountains) 7,376 feet / 2,248 m 1:10:24 Windfall Canyon Road turnoff 1:11:35 Entering Eureka, Eureka County, Nevada Elevation: 6,485 ft / 1,977 m Population: 610 (2010) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eureka,_Nevada This video may also be accessed as part of a playlist of all video captured on this day's drive: 2016-06-05 Loneliest Road in America: Cedar City-Panaca-Ely-Eureka-Austin-Fallon-Reno https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZiOqJL_FqTSxiejv_kYa_B0GAvz9ORle
Views: 2950 backpacktrot
Northern Nevada Ghost Towns & Mining Camps
 
06:09
Exploring ghost towns and mining camps has been one of my hobbies for many decades, and here you will find a collection of photos taken mostly in White Pine County in northeastern Nevada. You'll find photos of Hamilton, Belmont Mill, Ward charcoal ovens, Shermantown, and many others. I love to hike and explore but I especially love to photograph old, rusty cars found rotting away in the desert. Enjoy and let me know what you think.
Views: 16195 mixup98
300 ft ladder leads to a modern Gold Mine!
 
29:17
The Lexington! Modern day Gold mine is shut down for ten years then sold to Golden Dawn Minerals who plans on operating it again until............ #goldendawnminerals #gold #goldmine #exploringabandonedmines #gold mines
Exploring Huge Abandoned Mill And Mine
 
19:44
Those of you that like the urban exploration angle of this channel and those of you that have complained that I don’t visit enough abandoned mills will hopefully appreciate this one… I deliver both. This is actually the largest and most intact modern mill that I have ever come across. In the U.S., the modern mills I have come across that are still standing have had their contents completely stripped out and all that is really left is a shell of the building. That, obviously, is not the case here. The layout of the mill and how it all works may seem somewhat confusing in the first video, but it comes together more in the second video and we see how it all worked together. As I said in this video, I had to move on from the mill and come back to it later because the lads nearby that are producing aggregates from the waste rock of this mine fired up the rock crusher, which is extremely loud. So, I finish the mill in the second video. Modern work took place at the Santa Lucia Mine from 1943 to 1980, but it very much looked as if work took place here prior to then as well. As I mentioned in the video, barite, fluorite and galena were found in abundance here, but also linarite, sphalerite and chalcopyrite. This mix of minerals is apparently prized by some collectors. As with many mines, the precious minerals were concentrated here by hydrothermal processes. If you’re curious, check out the satellite view of this mine on Google Maps and you can see what I was working with as well as follow along where I explored. The GPS coordinates are: 39.443514, 8.463831 I have been very impressed by the Italian mines that I have visited. They don’t have the oppressive health and safety culture in Italy that promotes destroying abandoned sites and there doesn’t seem to be the culture of scrappers and “collectors” stripping sites of all objects of interest. I hate to say it, but in the U.S., a lot of that stuff would be gone. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 10980 TVR Exploring
Exploring A Sketchy Underground Placer Mine In The Backcountry
 
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The last video prompted a number of comments regarding lode mines versus placer mines. I realized I hadn’t posted any videos on underground placer gold mines in a while and since I have a number of new subscribers, I figured it was time for a refresher. Last week’s Alaska gold mine was a classic lode mine where the gold is embedded in hard rock and has to be crushed to be extracted. This week’s video is of underground placer mines, which are really buried ancient river channels. The gold is not contained within the rock, but is trapped in the river gravel and sand between the rocks. The miners at the first mine we visited had to punch in through the rock that you saw in order to reach the placer deposits hidden deeper under the mountain. However, at the second mine, the miners were immediately in the placer. That is very unusual for that part of California as almost all of the ancient river channels were buried by volcanic activity and they often have hundreds of feet of overburden above them. It’s impossible to know how the area around the second mine might have looked two hundred years ago since hydraulic mining washed away all of the earth covering the placer deposits at this sprawling site. However, I suspect that the only reason the miners at our second mine were immediately into the placer is because the hydraulic mine had already stripped away all of the overburden. Assuming this is the case, that would remain consistent with the other underground placer mines in the “Mother Lode” region of California. In sharp contrast to the first mine, I saw absolutely nothing at the second mine to suggest that it was a profitable venture. I expect it was mostly exploratory in nature and that the miners were hoping to locate the point where the ancient river channel hit the bedrock underneath. This zone is where the majority of the gold in these deposits collects. I didn’t see any sign that the miners located it... Further evidence for this is that there was no stoping or breasting underground where the miners had removed material. If they had found something worthwhile, they would have extracted it. Additionally, the adit and drifts meandered around as if they were exploring rather than having a clear destination. Hydraulic mining in California was banned in 1884. Given the amount of work done at the hydraulic mine around where the underground mine was located, it was apparently a profitable operation. So, the miners might have been attempting to keep a good thing going by switching to underground mining. Or it may have been a venture from decades later when the area enjoyed a brief renaissance during the 1930s when the United States was wallowing in the Great Depression and the government increased the price of gold (devaluing the U.S. dollar). Many desperate people took to the hills during that time in search of gold that was suddenly more valuable and these placer deposits would not have escaped their attention. The first mine we visited was a phenomenally successful underground placer mine. The mine was in operation for many years and was large enough to support at least two boarding houses along with everything else required by a large mining operation. As I mentioned in the video, there were miles of underground workings at this mine (we have come across dangerous air shafts deep in the forest that connect to this mine and the area they span is incredible). A map I have seen of this mine looks like a map of Manhattan with a huge grid running very methodically and systematically deeper into the mountain. There was nothing accidental or sloppy about this mine. The miners were very precise in clearing out as much of the gold-filled ancient river channel as possible. The mine had tracks running straight down the steep canyon where the mine is located to a large creek below the mine. Continuous loads of placer ore would be lowered down to the creek where the large volume of water would be used to wash the placer deposits and separate out the gold. ***** You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Views: 26000 TVR Exploring
Exploring an Old Miner's Cabin and His Abandoned Gold Mine
 
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I spent a day with Paul in the Nevada desert exploring and documenting an abandoned mine and the cabin next to it. The cabin dates back to the late 1800s. The mine itself was unusual because immediately inside the portal, there was a three-way intersection. We found a hand-cranked winch deep in the mine dating back over 100 years as well as a maze of tunnels and interconnected tunnels. #ExploringAbandonedMines #AbandonedMines #MineExploring #UndergroundExploration
HISTORIC SHAFT IN CENTRAL NEVADA MINE IN MOUNTAIN RANGE
 
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Can be seen as a dark grey rectangle in Google Maps Satellite
What The Heck Did I Find In This ABANDONED Nevada Gold & Silver Mine Tunnel? Is It A Bat Or A Bird?
 
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🎀 FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA! TWITTER: 🐦OFFICIAL: http://bit.ly/ewucrew 🐦BOB'S: http://bit.ly/ewubobz 🐦EMMA'S: http://bit.ly/ewuemma INSTAGRAM: 📷OFFICIAL: http://bit.ly/ewuig 📷BOB'S: http://bit.ly/ewubobig 📷EMMA'S: http://bit.ly/ewuemmaig FACEBOOK: 📱OFFICIAL: http://bit.ly/ewucrewfb 💸 SUPPORT US ON PATREON! Monthly Patron-exclusive Q&A videos, Patron-exclusive Discord, & support the creation of MORE YOUTUBE VIDEOS! 💰 http://bit.ly/ewupatreon What do you think this is? Bird? Bat? Other creature? Any ideas? Post your thoughts in the comments below. In our exploration of an abandoned mine tunnel, we find a strange creature. This urban exploration occured in the state of Nevada, in an old abandoned mine. Please Like, Share, Comment, and Subscribe. You may be wondering why we would be searching a mine for a fallout shelter. In the 1960's, the government designated certain mines as fallout shelters and stocked them full of survival supplies. The problem is, there was never an official list of which mines were specifically designated and stocked. We have a full list of all the possible fallout shelters and plan on finding one. Let us know if you enjoy these videos by giving us an up vote and by leaving a comment. #Abandoned #Exploring #ExploreWithUs
Views: 692956 Explore With Us
Mines of Colorado: A High-Altitude Adventure at an Abandoned Mine Prospect
 
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Late last summer, we headed out to Colorado and hiked up some mountains to this small abandoned mining prospect. Topographic maps showed several adits in the area and some shafts. We found and entered some underground workings but didn't find anything too substantial. One unique thing we found at this site were some old mining safety signs posted at one of the mine's entrances. #ExploringAbandonedMines #AbandonedMines #MineExploring #UndergroundExploration
Ropes take us down more big old  Mines In Mexico Part 3
 
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Third installment in a 5 part series exploring old abandoned mines in Mexico. We use ropes to travel down steep shafts, inclined shafts and explore underground railways abandoned long ago!
Exploring an Abandoned Iron Ore Mine
 
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In this episode we venture deep inside an abandoned iron ore mine. Check out ThruNite flashlights! Thrunite Official Online Store: http://www.thrunite.com *** Coupon code "THRUNITE" to get 5% OFF at ThruNite Online Store *** Amazon US: http://amzn.to/2lADBtr http://theproperpeople.com JOIN US ON: http://facebook.com/theproperpeople http://twitter.com/theproperpeople http://instagram.com/theproperpeople https://www.reddit.com/r/theproperpeople https://discord.gg/wgc23KN Enjoying our videos? Help us make more by buying a t-shirt: http://theproperpeople.spreadshirt.com Supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/theproperpeople Purchasing a print: http://www.redbubble.com/people/theproperpeople Or shopping through our Amazon affiliate link: https://www.amazon.com/?tag=thepropeo0d-20
Views: 235120 The Proper People
Exploring Abandoned Iron Mine near Spec, Virginia
 
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Spec Iron Mine: A place that practically no one knows about, is not on any trails and not even found on any maps...sounds like the perfect spot for Smell N Roses to check out. After spending hours studying topographic maps and aerial photos, I finally felt confident that I had pinpointed the location of the old mine. It was time to go have a look. Thanks for watching!!! Specular Hematite...a mineral commonly found in iron ore that gives the tiny mining community its name. Spec is located in the James River valley on the west side of the Blue Ridge Mountains, in Botetourt County, Virginia. In the 1920s, a roaring mining town began to grow here, as Pulaski Iron Company built and operated the Spec Iron Mine. Hundreds of people once lived and worked here, as electric trains carried miners and ore up and down the mountain from the hand dug mine to the processing facility. The mine went bust during the Great Depression, and the local economy soon dried up as well. Today, the town of Spec is little more than a few homes and some farms. Little evidence remains of the mining operations. About 3 miles and 2000 feet up the mountain, hidden away in a steep and rugged hollow, the actual mine is still there for those willing put in the effort to find it, and then get there. Warning: NEVER explore caves or mines alone. Since this adventure was too dangerous to undertake solo, I called up some friends to join me on this adventure. I met up with my friends David (Gadget's Adventures, link below) and Anthony, who had actually visited the mine before. On a cold rainy and foggy morning, we all met up on the Blue Ridge Parkway and made our way down the hollow to the mine. This was a very short hike, less than four miles round trip, but the majority of the route was off trail, in very steep terrain. At one point we dropped about 800 feet of elevation in only about a half mile distance. Let's just say it was steep! Once arriving to the mine site, we observed a couple of decaying brick structures, some old tanks laying around, and several addits in the side of the hill. The primary mine shaft extends into the mountain about 1/4 to 1/3 of a mile, and is as much as 400+ feet (vertical distance) below the mountain surface at its deepest point. The main mine contains at least four levels; however, without specialized equipment we were unable to safely reach beyond a small section of the second level. The mines were partially flooded, strewn with debris, and we felt as if the ceiling could collapse at any moment. After exploring the various tunnels, it was time to make the grueling climb back up the mountain to the Parkway. Check out Gadget's Adventures: https://www.youtube.com/user/skeldid LIKE my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/smellnrosesadventures FOLLOW me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/smell_n_roses/ Music: "Dude, Where's My Horse?" by Nat Keefe and The Bow Ties YouTube Audio Library "Universal" by Kevin MacLeod incompetech.com Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ #SmellnRoses #SNR #SNROutdoors
Views: 292 Smell N Roses
The Payne Mine !
 
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One of the most important and historic mines in the Sandon area the Payne Mine............ with old Hamilton Powder Company Dynamite!
Ghost town? Or just old mining stuff.. - Como Nevada ATV ride
 
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I took my Suzuki LT230s Quadsport up to Como Nevada for a ride and to just check out the area. I was told it was a ghost town, but doesn't even look like a town anymore. I make it up to some old mining equipment, an abandoned radio tower and a stone foundation from an old building. Some of the footage is just riding down the road, and it can be a bit.... 'Shakey'. I looked on Google Maps and there are what seems to be other structures. I will check those out if anyone is interested. The music in this video is by a band named 'Bird Creek' If anyone has any ideas for other videos, please let me know.
Views: 296 Jeremy Pruitt
Historic Gold Mine & Mill Deep In The Forest  - Part 2
 
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There is quite a lot to this abandoned mine site and so while I found a fair amount when I was wandering around on my own, I still missed interesting pieces of mining equipment that Michael showed me the next day. Further, I’m quite confident that there is plenty more scattered around in the brush or underneath the ruined buildings that we both missed. Eventually, forest fires will roar through all of the areas where these abandoned mines we document are located. When that happens, many hidden adits and pieces of metal equipment that were hidden away in brush will be revealed. It certainly isn’t in any way worth having a forest fire for, but it is an interesting side effect. As I mentioned in the prior video in this series, credit for our trip to this mine site goes to Gold Country Explorers. They get out in the forests (mostly in California’s Gold Country) and have an uncanny knack for tracking down stamp mills and other impressive elements of our industrial history – not to mention, a fair number of adits too! Check out their site – they post some great pictures on there: https://www.facebook.com/Gold-Country-Explorers-850167371691275/ It felt good to discover that adit that the Forest Service missed near the top of the hill. They are pretty thorough, but some things are not easy to spot in the forest and many adits are not marked on the topographic map. As I mentioned in the video, I’d like to show you the portal and how this adit was essentially hiding in plain sight. However, if I post that, the Forest Service will be able to find it pretty easily and will be out there as soon as the snow melts to gate it. So, I reluctantly declined to share the view from the outside. Like I said in the video, we need to preserve some of our industrial history outside of a museum. I also think it is important to maintain at least something in the way of the spirit of adventure and the excitement of discovery in our increasingly fearful and risk-averse society. The site of the shaft that we visited toward the end of the video was so badly degraded that I mistakenly speculated that it was an adit (easy to do when there were adits all over the place). However, my subsequent research demonstrated that it was, in fact, a shaft. I could not find many records on it, but the shaft dropped down for almost four hundred feet and apparently had two levels to tap into the hard rock gold veins underground. The large waste rock pile all around that section is supposed to be from the shaft. I’m not sure how the ore was transported from the shaft to the mill, but I’d be curious to know. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference… You can click here for the full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mine sites have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that niche of our history is gone forever. But, you know what? We enjoy doing it! This is exploring history firsthand – bushwhacking down steep canyons and over rough mountains, figuring out the techniques the miners used and the equipment they worked with, seeing the innovations they came up with, discovering lost mines that no one has been in for a century, wandering through ghost towns where the only sound is the wind... These journeys allow a feeling of connection to a time when the world was a very different place. And I’d love to think that in some small way we are paying tribute to those hardy miners that worked these mines before we were even born. So, yes, in short, we are adit addicts… I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring
Views: 52926 TVR Exploring
Illinois Gold Mine - Nevada - Gold Rush Expeditions, Inc.
 
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See the full property at: https://goldrushexpeditions.com/mining-claims-for-sale/illinois-gold-mine-and-mill/ The Illinois covers one hundred and sixty (160) acres following the general trending of lodes and veins as indicated by exhaustive geological reports. The Illinois claims encompasses many other mines and vein off shoots. The Sixty-Six Mine, The Smuggler Mine, The Wonder Girl Mine, The United Lodi Mine, The Sand Mound Shaft(mine) and the Marble Camp are all contained within the boundaries of the Illinois Property. In most cases, none of these ancillary mines have been measured or assayed for content or reserves. The Smuggler Mine, five hundred feet west of the Illinois Mine, but contained on the Illinois property, returned assay values of 1.74 OPT Gold and 7.24 OPT AG. The Illinois primary shaft was reported to be one thousand (1000) feet in depth in 1914 and additional development was recommended in a geological survey as gold and silver values were increasing with depth. Assays from 1941 reported as 1.14 OPT Gold and 111 OPT Silver. Since 1914, The property has not been furtherer developed to examine these deposits and their viability. Today it contains well over $15,000,000.00 in documented gold and silver reserves. This with none of the ores at the lower levels assessed or measured. The property is untapped and ready for development with intact drifts and shafts workings that will only require minimal rehabilitation.
Beginning the Hike Down the Old, Hidden, Abandoned Mining Road
 
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Topographic maps show an old mining road branching off of Laguna Meadow Road and leading down into a deep canyon near the Noble Mine site. Maps also show two vertical mineshafts at the road's end. This road is no longer visible from Laguna Meadow Road. It truly is a forgotten, abandoned, hidden road! This is a video record of the journey down that road and what I found at the end of it.
NEVADA Publications BOOKS | Ghost Town Maps | Death Valley | Treasure Hunters Guide
 
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(775) 747-0800 Ghost Town maps, Nevada Publications http://nevadapublicationsonline.com/ Nevada Publications is owned and operated by Stanley W. Paher from his office in Reno, NV. This bookstore holds one of the Old West's largest collection of books concerning Places, People, Ghost Town Maps, Mines, etc. These books deal primairly with the states of Nevada, Arizona, and California. Books on Ghost Towns for Nevada and Death Valley Call for pricing and shipping details at 1-775-747-0800. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztovElSk9fM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ab47bj1Hmno https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rdQqX9t8tY Arizona Treasure Hunter’s Ghost Town Guide, Aurora: Ghost City of the Dawn, Beatty Frontier Oasis, Before the Nukes , Bodie Bonanza, Bodie Boomtown: Gold Town, Bodie: Mines Are Looking Well, Comstock Conflagration, The California Star , Breaks, Brains and Balls, Callville: Head of Navigation Arizona Territory, Nevadans: The Spirit of the Silver State, Eastern California Treasure Hunters Ghost Town Guide, Elegance on C Street
Views: 884 Nevada Publications
Finding a Few Abandoned Gold Mines and A Creepy, Abandoned Miner's Cabin
 
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Four mine tunnels and a building were indicated on my topographic maps in side canyon off of Deer Park Road. No one had hiked this particular trail in quite some time because there were NO footprints anywhere. Found a few mine entrances and a derelict miner's cabin.
Crazy Volcanic Brown's long lost mine.
 
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Awesome long lost extensive mine owned by a crazy guy who told the government there was nothing there....check for yourself!
The History of the Old WASP Gold Mine
 
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Clay Worst, owner of the Old WASP Mine, shares it's amazing story with our host Charlies LeSueur. Take home or download a Book written by our Host Charlie LeSueur Riding the Hollywood Trail: Tales of the Silver Screen Cowboys (Volume 1) https://amzn.to/2GR41nd The Western Legends Live On: Tales & Interviews with the Cowboy Stars of the Silver Screen https://amzn.to/2GS51rg Riding the Hollywood Trail II: Blazing the Early Television Trail https://amzn.to/2GPG7rY The Westerns: Creating the Myth for Film and Television: Short Shots # 1 (Volume 1) https://amzn.to/2Vxg8hd Where Have All the Westerns Gone?: Essays on Western Film https://amzn.to/2VuDvIp The Western Legends Live On: Tales & Interviews with the Cowboy Stars of the Silver Screen https://amzn.to/2DDBxLL Save at Cablelas.com and support the show http://bit.ly/2VH6lBO 1800Gear is your gear guide for life. Shop hiking, camping, hunting and outdoor gear at the best prices. http://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt... #MOTSM #superstitionmountains #OldWASPMine #mysteriesofthesuperstitionmountains Exploring the Mysteries and Stories of the Superstition Mountains in Arizona with the help of the Superstition Mountain Museum
Nelson NV offroading go karting
 
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some clips of us off road-ing near at Nelsons Landing, Nelson NV 15 miles from boulder city nv, old mining areas, techatticup mine, the trails there are spotty and dead end alot...not really good for sand rails..... fun either way though, neat mine exploring etc
Views: 267 vegasphotoman1