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Perfect secrecy | Journey into cryptography | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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Claude Shannon's idea of perfect secrecy: no amount of computational power can help improve your ability to break the one-time pad Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/random-vs-pseudorandom-number-generators?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/case-study-ww2-encryption-machines?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 132835 Khan Academy Labs
Shannons Theory
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 10249 nptelhrd
Shannon Proof of Vernam's Cipher Unbreakability
 
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Here is the short and far reaching proof that Vernam's 1917 cipher is absolutely unbreakable! The same proof implicates AES, DES, RSA, ECC and all other highly regarded ciphers, proving they are all definitely breakable. This cornerstone proof is of great importance for anyone striving to understand the capabilities and vulnerabilities of modern cryptography. A few minutes of mental focus, and you will understand the nature of cryptography much better than if you read volumes of soft crypto analysis.
Views: 3783 Gideon Samid
Nyquist Limit Theorem, Shannon's Channel Capacity, Maximum Bit Rate solved example
 
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Nyquist Limit Theorem, Shannon's Channel Capacity, Maximum Bit Rate solved example Data Communication and Networking Lectures in Hindi English
cryptography - Perfect Secrecy
 
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cryptography To get certificate subscribe: https://www.coursera.org/learn/cryptography ======================== Playlist URL: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWb07OLBdFI2QIHvPo3aTTeu ============================ Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/intrigano ============================ https://scsa.ge/en/online-courses/ https://www.facebook.com/cyberassociation/
Views: 3909 intrigano
Information Theory part 12: Information Entropy (Claude Shannon's formula)
 
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Entropy is a measure of the uncertainty in a random variable (message source). Claude Shannon defines the "bit" as the unit of entropy (which is the uncertainty of a fair coin flip). In this video information entropy is introduced intuitively using bounce machines & yes/no questions. Note: This analogy applies to higher order approximations, we simply create a machine for each state and average over all machines!
Views: 108730 Art of the Problem
L10   Shannon's First Theorem by NPTEL IIT BOMBAY
 
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Like the video and Subscribe to channel for more updates. Recommended Books (5 Books , Please buy anything from the below links to support the channel): A Students Guide to Coding and Information Theory http://amzn.to/2zo0MN8 Information Theory, Coding & Cryptography, 1e http://amzn.to/2D72DrX Information Theory and Coding http://amzn.to/2C3n1gv Information Theory, Coding and Cryptography http://amzn.to/2zpRCPW Information Theory and Coding: Basics and Practices http://amzn.to/2zpJQFV
Views: 35 KNOWLEDGE TREE
DES Confusion And Diffusion
 
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This lecture explains Block Cipher primitives.
Views: 17003 Project Rhea
Claude Shannon - Father of the Information Age
 
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Considered the founding father of the electronic communication age, Claude Shannon's work ushered in the Digital Revolution. This fascinating program explores his life and the major influence his work had on today's digital world through interviews with his friends and colleagues. [1/2002] [Science] [Show ID: 6090]
Claude Shannon's Perfect Secrecy
 
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Claude Shannon's idea of perfect secrecy is introduced. I'd like to get the point across that no amount of computational power can help improve your ability to break a perfectly secrect encryption scheme.
Views: 76306 Art of the Problem
Information Theory part 11: Claude Shannon: A Mathematical Theory of Communication
 
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Claude Shannon demonstrated how to generate "english looking" text using Markov chains and how this gives a satisfactory representation of the statistical structure of any message. He uses this model as a framework with which to define 'information sources' and how they should be measured. References: http://www.mast.queensu.ca/~math474/shannon1948.pdf
Views: 62826 Art of the Problem
WII? (2a) Information Theory, Claude Shannon, Entropy, Redundancy, Data Compression & Bits
 
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What is Information? - Part 2a - Introduction to Information Theory: Script: http://crackingthenutshell.org/what-is-information-part-2a-information-theory ** Please support my channel by becoming a patron: http://www.patreon.com/crackingthenutshell ** Or... how about a Paypal Donation? http://crackingthenutshell.org/donate Thanks so much for your support! :-) - Claude Shannon - Bell Labs - Father of Information Theory - A Mathematical Theory of Communication - 1948 - Book, co-written with Warren Weaver - How to transmit information efficiently, reliably & securely through a given channel (e.g. tackling evesdropping) - Applications. Lossless data compression (ZIP files). Lossy data compression (MP3, JPG). Cryptography, thermal physics, quantum computing, neurobiology - Shannon's definition not related to meaningfulness, value or other qualitative properties - theory tackles practical issues - Shannon's information, a purely quantitative measure of communication exchanges - Shannon's Entropy. John von Neumann. Shannon's information, information entropy - avoid confusion with with thermodynamical entropy - Shannon's Entropy formula. H as the negative of a certain sum involving probabilities - Examples: fair coin & two-headed coin - Information gain = uncertainty reduction in the receiver's knowledge - Shannon's entropy as missing information, lack of information - Estimating the entropy per character of the written English language - Constraints such as "I before E except after C" reduce H per symbol - Taking into account redundancy & contextuality - Redundancy, predictability, entropy per character, compressibility - What is data compression? - Extracting redundancy - Source Coding Theorem. Entropy as a lower limit for lossless data compression. - ASCII codes - Example using Huffman code. David Huffman. Variable length coding - Other compression techniques: arithmetic coding - Quality vs Quantity of information - John Tukey's bit vs Shannon's bit - Difference between storage bit & information content. Encoded data vs Shannon's information - Coming in the next video: error correction and detection, Noisy-channel coding theorem, error-correcting codes, Hamming codes, James Gates discovery, the laws of physics, How does Nature store Information, biology, DNA, cosmological & biological evolution
Views: 57219 Cracking The Nutshell
A mathematical theory of communication | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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Claude Shannon demonstrated how to generate "english looking" text using Markov chains. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/informationtheory/moderninfotheory/v/information-entropy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/informationtheory/moderninfotheory/v/markov_chains?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 67086 Khan Academy Labs
Chapter 2, part 6: Crypto Basics --- crypto history, Claude Shannon
 
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Information Security: Principles and Practice, 2nd edition, by Mark Stamp Chapter 2: Crypto Basics Section 2.4 crypto history, Claude Shannon Class Lecture, 2011
Views: 3436 Mark Stamp
cryptography - Perfect Secrecy Part II
 
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Cryptography To get certificate subscribe: https://www.coursera.org/learn/cryptography ======================== Playlist URL: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWb07OLBdFI2QIHvPo3aTTeu ============================ Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/intrigano ============================ https://scsa.ge/en/online-courses/ https://www.facebook.com/cyberassociation/
Views: 2665 intrigano
(Info 1.1) Entropy - Definition
 
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Definition and basic properties of information entropy (a.k.a. Shannon entropy)
Views: 88518 mathematicalmonk
Wireless Coding and Modulation: Part 2 -Shannon's Theorem
 
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Comprehensive course on wireless and mobile networking by Prof. Raj Jain of Washington University, St Louis, USA
Views: 263 Scholartica Channel
Shannon (Bay's Theorem) ISSR CS515 (Arabic)
 
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محاولة لتبسيط Bay's Theorem برجاء إبلاغي في حالة وجود أخطاء
Views: 448 Ahmed Abdelghany
Shannons Theory (Contd...1)
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 5942 nptelhrd
Shannons Theory (Contd...2)
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 4817 nptelhrd
Information theory: Entropy
 
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An explanation of entropy in information theory and how to calculate it. (The last video ran long, so I had to slice it up.) More on information theory: http://tinyurl.com/zozlx http://tinyurl.com/8bueub http://tinyurl.com/bfpu8b http://tinyurl.com/as2txv http://tinyurl.com/dcsgt2 http://tinyurl.com/ct5phc The music is the third movement of Carl Maria von Weber's Clarinet Concerto No. 2, as performed by the Skidmore College Orchestra. http://www.musopen.com/music.php?type=piece&id=67 http://myspace.com/zjemptv http://emptv.com/
Views: 111970 Zinnia Jones
L26   Shannon's Second Theorem by NPTEL IIT BOMBAY
 
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Like the video and Subscribe to channel for more updates. Recommended Books (5 Books , Please buy anything from the below links to support the channel): A Students Guide to Coding and Information Theory http://amzn.to/2zo0MN8 Information Theory, Coding & Cryptography, 1e http://amzn.to/2D72DrX Information Theory and Coding http://amzn.to/2C3n1gv Information Theory, Coding and Cryptography http://amzn.to/2zpRCPW Information Theory and Coding: Basics and Practices http://amzn.to/2zpJQFV
Views: 39 KNOWLEDGE TREE
What is cryptography? | Journey into cryptography | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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What is Cryptography? A story which takes us from Caesar to Claude Shannon. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/caesar-cipher?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/algorithms/intro-to-algorithms/v/what-are-algorithms?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 795235 Khan Academy
Public Key Cryptography: RSA Encryption Algorithm
 
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RSA Public Key Encryption Algorithm (cryptography). How & why it works. Introduces Euler's Theorem, Euler's Phi function, prime factorization, modular exponentiation & time complexity. Link to factoring graph: http://www.khanacademy.org/labs/explorations/time-complexity
Views: 583573 Art of the Problem
Claude Shannon demonstrates machine learning
 
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from http://techchannel.att.com/play-video.cfm/2010/3/16/In-Their-Own-Words-Claude-Shannon-Demonstrates-Machine-Learning
Views: 64855 Sean Palmer
Public key cryptography - Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (full version)
 
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The history behind public key cryptography & the Diffie-Hellman key exchange algorithm. We also have a video on RSA here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXB-V_Keiu8
Views: 641554 Art of the Problem
Mod-01 Lec-10 Shannon`s First Theorem
 
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Information Theory and Coding by Prof. S.N.Merchant, Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 12699 nptelhrd
Lecture 5: Entropy and Data Compression (IV): Shannon's Source Coding Theorem, Symbol Codes
 
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Lecture 5 of the Course on Information Theory, Pattern Recognition, and Neural Networks. Produced by: David MacKay (University of Cambridge) Author: David MacKay, University of Cambridge A series of sixteen lectures covering the core of the book "Information Theory, Inference, and Learning Algorithms" (Cambridge University Press, 2003, http://www.inference.eng.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/) which can be bought at Amazon (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0521642981/davidmackay0f-21), and is available free online (http://www.inference.eng.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itila/). A subset of these lectures used to constitute a Part III Physics course at the University of Cambridge. The high-resolution videos and all other course material can be downloaded from the Cambridge course website (http://www.inference.eng.cam.ac.uk/mackay/itprnn/). Snapshots of the lecture can be found here: http://www.inference.eng.cam.ac.uk/itprnn_lectures/ These lectures are also available at http://videolectures.net/course_information_theory_pattern_recognition/ (synchronized with snapshots and slides)
Views: 15382 Jakob Foerster
Fermat's Little Theorem (Visualization)
 
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Fermat's Little Theorem Visualized. Introduction to a key result in elementary number theory using a visualization with beads
Views: 91336 Art of the Problem
Perfect Cipher - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 6334 Udacity
The one-time pad | Journey into cryptography | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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The perfect cipher Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/frequency-stability?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/polyalphabetic-cipher?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 424921 Khan Academy
Side Channel Analysis of Cryptographic Implementations
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 6018 nptelhrd
Marvin Minsky - Why I got on so well with Claude Shannon (125/151)
 
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To hear more of Marvin Minsky’s stories, go to the playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB2SsvcECzI&list=PLVV0r6CmEsFxJatFYBb7P4NZscvJw1f0r The scientist, Marvin Minsky (1927-2016) was one of the pioneers of the field of Artificial Intelligence, having founded the MIT AI Lab in 1970. Since the 1950s, his work involved trying to uncover human thinking processes and replicate them in machines. [Listener: Christopher Sykes] TRANSCRIPT: Claude Shannon had been working at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey. And I forget how we became acquainted, but in the summer of 1952, when I was in the middle of graduate school at Princeton in fact, we got invited – John McCarthy and I, who was also a graduate student – to spend the summer working with Claude Shannon on theories of computation and things like that. This is before there were hard… there were hardly any computers in the world in 1952, but somehow, that connection was made. And we hit it off because both Shannon and I were addicted to making interesting new mechanical devices. And we both had Erector sets and Meccano sets, which enable a child to build pretty complicated machinery in a few minutes. So, I think the reason that Shannon and I got along so well was that we had pretty similar mathematical interests, but we were also interested in mechanical gadgets and... I remember one day, we were trying… I was trying to assemble something by pushing a wire into something and I couldn’t figure out how to get it to go through all that… little turns and things. Shannon said: 'That shouldn’t be hard, it’s as easy as pushing a string.' And it sort of characterizes this problem in a way that has always stuck in my mind. For… some problems are hard because they’re terribly complicated. Some problems are hard just because it’s not in the nature of the thing that it can be done at all.
Constructive cryptography and information theory
 
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Ueli Maurer, ETH Zurich Annual Workshop & Feder Family Award Ceremony Advanced Communications Center Tel Aviv University 22/2/16
Views: 696 TAUVOD
Probability Review Pt 1 - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 5964 Udacity
Shannon 100 - 26/10/2016 - Olivier RIOUL
 
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Shannon’s Formula Wlog(1+SNR): A Historical Perspective Olivier Rioul (Télécom-ParisTech) As is well known, the milestone event that founded the field of information theory is the publication of Shannon’s 1948 paper entitled "A Mathematical Theory of Communication". This article brings together so many fundamental advances and strokes of genius that Shannon has become the hero of thousands of researchers, praised almost as a deity. One can say without exaggeration that Shannon's theorems are the mathematical theorems which have made possible the digital world as we know it today. We first describe some of his most outstanding contributions, culminating with Shannon's emblematic capacity formula C = W.log(1+P/N) where W is the channel bandwidth and P/N is the channel signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Incidentally, Hartley’s name is often associated with the same formula, owing to "Hartley’s rule": Counting the highest possible number of distinguishable values for a given amplitude A and precision D yields a similar expression log(1 + A/D). In the information theory community, the following "historical" statements are generally well accepted: (1) Hartley put forth his rule in 1928, twenty years before Shannon; (2) Shannon’s formula as a fundamental trade-off between transmission rate, bandwidth, and signal-to-noise ratio came unexpected in 1948; (3) Shannon’s formula is exact while Hartley’s rule is imprecise; (4) Hartley’s expression is not an appropriate formula for the capacity of a communication channel. We show that all these four statements are somewhat wrong: (1) Hartley’s rule does not seem to be Hartley’s. (2) At least seven other authors have independently derived formulas very similar to Shannon’s in the same year 1948 — the earliest published original contribution being a Note at the Académie des Sciences by a French engineer Jacques Laplume. (3) A careful calculation shows that Hartley’s rule does coincide with Shannon’s formula. (4) Hartley’s rule is in fact mathematically correct as the capacity of a communication channel, where the noise is not Gaussian but uniform, and the signal limitation is not on the power but on the amplitude. (This talk was presented in part at the MaxEnt 2014 conference in Amboise as a joint work with José Carlos Magossi (Unicamp, São Paulo State, Brasil)). Olivier Rioul (PhD, HDR) is professor at Télécom ParisTech and École Polytechnique, France. His research interests are in applied mathematics and include various, sometimes unconventional, applications of information theory such as inequalities in statistics, hardware security, and experimental psychology.
Security and Composition of Rational Cryptographic Protocols
 
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Talk by Ira Globus-Harris; Adam Groce; Palak Jain; Mark Schultz; Vassilis Zikas, presented at Crypto 2017 rump session.
Views: 76 TheIACR
Gambling with Secrets: Part 4/8 (Private Key Cryptography)
 
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Private key Cryptography is explored from the Caesar Cipher to the one-time pad. We introduce encryption, decryption, ciphers, cryptanalysis and what it means to design a strong cipher. Finally perfect secrecy is explained with the invention of the one-time pad.
Views: 38344 Art of the Problem
Symmetric Key Ciphers
 
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Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 18523 nptelhrd
Chapter 3, part 4: Symmetric Key Crypto --- block ciphers, DES
 
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Information Security: Principles and Practice, 2nd edition, by Mark Stamp Chapter 3: Symmetric Key Crypto Section 3.3.2 block ciphers, DES Class Lecture, 2011
Views: 21351 Mark Stamp
4.12 The Algorithmic Coding Theorem
 
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Unit 4 Module 12 Algorithmic Information Dynamics: A Computational Approach to Causality and Living Systems---From Networks to Cells by Hector Zenil and Narsis A. Kiani Algorithmic Dynamics Lab www.algorithmicdynamics.net Refs: - T.M. Cover, J.A. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory, 2nd Edition, Wiley, 2006. - M. Li and P. Vitányi, An introduction to Kolmogorov complexity and its applications, 2nd edition, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1997. - R. J. Solomonoff, A formal theory of inductive inference: Parts 1 and 2. Information and Control, 7:1--22 and 224--254, 1964. - R. J. Solomonoff, "Algorithmic Probability\[LongDash]Its Discovery\[LongDash]Its Properties and Application to Strong AI," In H. Zenil (ed), Randomness Through Computation: Some Answers, More Questions, World Scientific, 2012. - M. Li and P. Vitányi, An introduction to Kolmogorov complexity and its applications, 2nd edition, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1997. - C.S. Calude, Information and Randomness. An Algorithmic Perspective, 2nd edition, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2002. Revised and Extended - H. Zenil, The World is Either Algorithmic or Mostly Random, winning 3rd. Place in the International Essay Context of the FQXi, 2011.
Views: 323 Complexity Explorer
Cryptography information theoretic security and the one time pad
 
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Cryptography information theoretic security and the one time pad To get certificate subscribe: https://www.coursera.org/learn/crypto Playlist URL: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWYosqucluZghEVjUkopdD1e About this course: Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. In this course you will learn the inner workings of cryptographic systems and how to correctly use them in real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two parties generate a shared secret key.
Views: 560 intrigano
What is information theory? | Journey into information theory | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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A broad introduction to this field of study Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/informationtheory/info-theory/v/language-of-coins-2-8-proto-writing?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/random-algorithms-probability/v/fermat-primality-test-prime-adventure-part-10?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 154845 Khan Academy Labs
RSA Algorithm - Data Encryption And Compression
 
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https://chat.whatsapp.com/JCelI4vL5JPLCY3cufm7ri
Views: 883 Ashish Gupta
Introduction to channel capacity | Journey into information theory | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to Channel Capacity & Message Space Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/informationtheory/moderninfotheory/v/how-do-we-measure-information-language-of-coins-10-12?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/informationtheory/moderninfotheory/v/symbol-rate-information-theory?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
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