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Lecture on cryptococcal meningitis diagnosis (for LIFE Worldwide)
 
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Lecture on diagnosis of cryptococcal (fungal) meningitis by Professor Malcolm Richardson (University of Manchester) for LIFE Worldwide. Microscopy. Culture. Antigen detection (CrAg) by latex agglutination of laterla flow assay, and causes of false positives or false negatives. Histopathology and histological differential diagnosis. For slides and alternative formats please visit http://life-worldwide.org/life-education-slide-sets-video-presentations-and-reading-materials
Meningitis - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is meningitis? Meningitis describes inflammation of the meninges, the protective membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 426242 Osmosis
Managing Meningitis - Mayo Clinic
 
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Meningitis is an illness that can be very scary. It's an infection that can make people very, very sick. Babies who get the disease are at particular risk of getting dangerously ill because it can be tricky to diagnose and symptoms can escalate quickly. More on how to recognize and treat meningitis from Mayo Clinic.
Views: 109624 Mayo Clinic
India ink positive ||Cryptococcal Meningitis
 
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||India Ink Preparation|| This test is ordered in suspected case of cryptococcal meningitis. Principle The capsule is non ionic, so that the  India ink  used will not bind to it. This is reason, capsule appears as a clear halo around the yeast cells. Requirements India ink slide and cover slip C.S.F. specimen Droppers or inoculating loop waste discarding container or Bunsen burner Centrifuge test tubes Procedure 1. Centrifuge the C.S.F. for 5 to  10 minutes, 2. Remove the supernatant fluid and mix the sediment. 3. Transfer  equal amount of  sediment and India ink i.e. a drop of the sediment to a slide and add a drop of India ink . 4. Mix and cover with a  cover slip. 5. Now, examine the preparation under microscope using the 40X objective. Observation Look for oval or round cells, some showing budding, irregular in size, measuring 2-10 µm in diameter and surrounded by  a large unstained capsule as shown in above figure. Very rarely capsules are absent. For more details, go with website @ http://universe84a.com/india-ink-preparation-cryptococcal-meningitis-suspected/ #EncapsulatedYEASTS #CapsulOfCryptococcus #FungalMeningitis
Views: 204 Microhub Plus
Bacterial Meningitis (CNS Infection) – Infectious Diseases | Lecturio
 
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This video “Bacterial Meningitis (CNS Infection)” is part of the Lecturio course “Infectious Diseases” ► WATCH the complete course on http://lectur.io/bacterialmeningitiscnsinfection ► LEARN ABOUT: - Neisseria Meningitidis (Meningococcus): Signs & Symptoms - Streptococcus Agalactiae - Bacterial Meningitis: Diagnosis & CSF Findings - CSF CSF Graim's - CSF Rapid Tests - Bacterial Meningitis: Management & Empirical Treatment When Gram’s Stain - Bacterial Meningitis: Prognosis - Bacterial Meningitis: Etiology & MCV-4 Meningococcal Vaccine ► THE PROF: Your tutor is Dr. John Fisher, who is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in both Medicine and Infectious Diseases. In his 30 years on the faculty of the Medical College of Georgia he has received multiple awards for his excellent teaching. Dr. Fisher is also the author of 61 original publications in refereed journals and 44 book chapters. ► LECTURIO is your single-point resource for medical school: Study for your classes, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2, MCAT or MBBS with video lectures by world-class professors, recall & USMLE-style questions and textbook articles. Create your free account now: http://lectur.io/bacterialmeningitiscnsinfection ► INSTALL our free Lecturio app iTunes Store: https://app.adjust.com/z21zrf Play Store: https://app.adjust.com/b01fak ► READ TEXTBOOK ARTICLES related to this video: Bacterial, Viral and Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System http://lectur.io/bacterialmeningitisinfectiousdiseases ► SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://lectur.io/subscribe ► WATCH MORE ON YOUTUBE: http://lectur.io/playlists ► LET’S CONNECT: • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lecturio.medical.education.videos • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lecturio_medical_videos • Twitter: https://twitter.com/LecturioMed
Latex Agglutination Test - Amrita University
 
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▶ This video channel is developed by Amrita University's CREATE http://www.amrita.edu/create ▶ Subscribe @ https://www.youtube.com/user/amritacreate http://www.youtube.com/amritavlab ▶ Like us @ https://www.facebook.com/CREATEatAmrita ▶ For more Information @ http://vlab.amrita.edu/index.php?sub=3&brch=69&sim=195&cnt=1 ▶ Amrita Virtual Lab Project website http://vlab.amrita.edu Latex agglutination tests have been in use since 1956 t o detect a wide range of analytes in the clinical laboratory. When spectrophotometers and nephelometers are used in place of the human eye to detect agglutination, it is possible to measure quantitatively and to develop sensitive particle immunoassays. Latex particles may be build from different organic materials to a desired diameter, and may be functionalized with chemical groups to facilitate attachment of molecules Proteins and other molecules may be passively adsorbed to the latex particles or covalently coupled to functional groups. Some described automated latex agglutination tests have sensitivities of a few picograms of analyte.
Views: 32477 Amrita Vlab
Cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) testing
 
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Video produced by Biosynex for LIFE Worldwide
Dr. Angela Loyse (St George's, Univ. of London): Cryptococcal Meningitis in LMICs
 
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At ISNTD d³ 2017, Dr. Angela Loyse (St George's, University of London) speaks about the highly under-reported burden of cryptococcal meningitis in low & middle income countries, as well as the urgent gaps in access to effective treatment & diagnostic tests
Diagnosis of pulmonary cryptococcosis – Supplementary video ID 178391
 
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Supplementary video of original research “The performance of serum cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen test, histopathology and culture of the lung tissue for diagnosis of pulmonary cryptococcosis in patients without HIV infection” published in the open access journal Infection and Drug Resistance by Zhou Y, Lin PC, Ye JR, et al. Read the full paper here: https://www.dovepress.com/the-performance-of-serum-cryptococcal-capsular-polysaccharide-antigen--peer-reviewed-article-IDR
Views: 80 Dove Medical Press
SYMPTOMS OF CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS
 
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Views: 196 Health Apta
Scientists develop new meningitis test
 
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Scientists at Strathclyde University have developed a new test that could be used to speed up the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.
Views: 256 STV News
Meningitis Information : Fungal Meningitis Symptoms
 
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Fungal meningitis symptoms are similar to regular meningitis symptoms, but the disease usually has a slower onset that begins with an infection in the nasal pharynx. Understand the symptoms of fungal meningitis with helpful information from a doctor in this free video on meningitis.
Views: 11553 ehowhealth
Cryptococcal meningitis
 
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52-year-old female that presented with acute onset delirium and seizures. There is patchy ill-defined T2 FLAIR hyperintense signal involving the subcortical, deep, and periventricular white matter of the supratentorial compartment, worse in the frontal horn and periatrial regions. There is a more nodular region of T2 FLAIR hyperintense signal within the subcortical white matter of the posterolateral left temporal lobe and patchy T2 FLAIR hyperintense signal abnormality in the substance of the midbrain tegmentum extending into the tectal plate. There are no suspicious abnormalities on the diffusion-weighted images, and post contrast sequences demonstrate ill-defined enhancement along the perivascular spaces worse in the bilateral frontal regions. A differential of meningoencephalitis, demyelinating disease, and vasculitis was given. Lumbar puncture and CSF fluid analysis was performed demonstrating a cryptococcal meningitis. CNS cryptococcosis results from infection of the central nervous system the with the fungus cryptococcus neoformans. Disease is more commonly seen in immunocompromised individuals. Clinical presentation typically begins with meningitis or meningoencephalitis, headache, seizure or altered vision due to raised intracranial pressure. Common MR imaging features include enlarged perivascular spaces within the basal ganglia with a pseudocyst appearance. NMR303G For more, visit our website at http://ctisus.com
Views: 236 CTisus
Cryptococcal Meningitis - Dr. O.C. Abraham -FIC
 
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A comprehensive 16 modules e-Course on the important aspects of fungal infections. Fungal Infections e-Course: https://fungalcourses.org/ Topics Covered: https://fungalcourses.org/local/staticpage/view.php?page=fungal-course-contents Faculty: https://fungalcourses.org/local/staticpage/view.php?page=faculty-fungal Supported & Sponsored by: FISF| Pfizer| Golden Tree Learning
Meningitis Alert For Gay, Bissexual Men and National HIV Test
 
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Meningitis Alert For Gay and Bissexual Men and National HIV Test
Views: 373 News Up Now
Diagnosing Meningitis
 
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Dads Space present Dr Hilary Jones talking about how to diagnose meningitis, an often fatal or disabling illness for young children. Courtesy of Brother Max and Mother&Baby magazine.
Views: 2035 DadsSpace
CrAg LFA Test Procedure
 
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The IMMY Cryptococcal Antigen (CrAg) Lateral Flow Assay (LFA) is easy to run, and easy to interpret.
Views: 677 IMMYvideos
Could new test speed up the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis?
 
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http://www.healthinsurancegroup.co.uk/ Could a new test accelerate the process of diagnosing bacterial meningitis? According to recent reports, a new test that could speed up the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis has been identified. Recent reports suggest that scientists at Strathclyde University have developed the test which used nano particles and lasers to fingerprint more than one bacterium at a time. It is suggested that this not only allows for a quicker diagnosis but also opens up the door to targeted treatment. Reportedly, the age group most commonly affected by bacterial meningitis is under five. Suggestions are made that identifying the exact bacteria responsible is currently a timely process and if not caught quickly, bacterial meningitis could lead to blood poisoning and brain damage. Meningitis is a disease which can kill and severely disable very quickly. Bacterial meningitis is most common in children under five and it can often take time to diagnose precisely which bacteria are responsible, so we welcome any progress which leads to a quicker diagnosis. Early treatment is key to a good outcome, so both early diagnosis and targeted treatment of bacterial meningitis is essential to help prevent permanent neurological damage.
CrAg® LFA U.S. Test Procedure
 
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The IMMY CrAg® LFA (Cryptococcal Antigen Lateral Flow Assay) is the first and only immunochromatographic dipstick assay for the qualitative and semiquanitative detection of cryptococcal antigen. This lateral flow assay is revolutionizing cryptococcal antigen testing, by delivering analytical sensitivity that is up to 200x more sensitive than other commercial assays.
Views: 1456 IMMYvideos
Fungal meningitis 101
 
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Shelby Lin explains who's at risk for fungal meningitis and what to do if you develop symptoms. For more CNN videos, check out our YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/cnn Or visit our site at http://www.cnn.com/video/
Views: 2923 CNN
Dr. Pritish Tosh discusses bacterial meningitis
 
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It's the height of flu season but not all symptoms of the virus point to influenza. Sudden fever and headache may also be symptoms of early meningitis, which often mimics the flu.
Views: 4145 Mayo Clinic
Fungal Meningitis Symptoms and Risk
 
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This video describe some symptoms/ risk of meningitis and some treatments. If you received a spinal injection with steroids and as a result have meningitis, you may have a case. For the past 30 years Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard P.C. has been helping Illinois personal injury victims get the justice they deserve. Visit our website http://www.salvilaw.com/ for more information or call us at 888-615-8589 to discuss your claim.
Views: 451 salvilaw
Medical School - Meningitis: A Simple Review
 
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Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/iMedSchool Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Imedicalschool?ref=hl iTunes Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/imedicalschool/id577103998?mt=2 Website: www.medpulse.org Discussion about the presentation of meningitis, signs, and diagnosis of meningitis. Remember meningitis is the inflammation and infection of the covering of the central nervous system such as the dura. On the other hand encephalitis is the infection/inflammation of the actual brain itself. Menignitis can be caused by many types of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. In recent news, compounded steroids used in spinal injections has caused a multitude of cases of fungal meningitis, resulting in many deaths making understanding this topic very important for healthcare workers. Follow us on Twitter: iMedSchool Make sure to check out our podcast on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/imedicalschool/id577103998?mt=2 iMedicalSchool is a channel dedicated to helping you understand complex medical topics in a simple manner. We are dedicated to making sure that you understand every topic presented. We are happy to answer question and take suggestions. No matter if you are in medical school, nursing school or physician assistant school we are here to serve you.
Views: 84907 iMedicalSchool
Meningococcal Signs and Symptoms
 
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Meningococcal disease is a rare, life-threatening condition. While the disease is very serious, in most cases early detection and treatment result in complete recovery. The infection is not transferred easily. It is spread by secretions from the nose and throat of a person, without obvious symptoms, who is carrying the bacteria that cause the disease. Close and prolonged contact is needed to pass it on. People infected with meningococcal disease become unwell very quickly and tragically around 10 percent of patients with the disease die, despite receiving rapid treatment.
Views: 6084 HNEkidshealth
Use This Glass testing Method And Find Out if You Have Meningitis
 
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9 Main Meningitis Symptoms You Should Know About Сhildren are most susceptible to meningitis. We'd like to remind parents about the ways of detecting meningitis and which symptoms you should pay attention to primarily. Meningitis is a disease connected with the inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. The etiology of this disease can vary, but the symptoms of different types are generally similar. It is considered that children are most susceptible to this disease. This is why Health Digest decided to remind parents about the ways of detecting meningitis and which symptoms should be paid attention to primarily. SUMMARY Sudden fever One of the symptoms of meningitis is a fever that starts suddenly. A child starts to shiver and keeps complaining that he always feels cold. The sick person’s temperature goes up very quickly, and it very often becomes an uphill task to bring it down. However, due to the fact that this symptom is a sign of many other diseases, one should pay attention to other factors showing changes in a child’s condition. A severe headache Headaches caused by meningitis are often not simply strong but unbearable. Moreover, the pain can impact a patient’s neck as well, but due to the "splitting" headache, he simply can’t pay attention to it. A bulging fontanel can be an important sign of meningitis in newborn babies. Double vision A person affected by meningitis cannot focus his eyesight, which is why his vision becomes doubled. Stomachaches, nausea, and vomiting A person sick with meningitis loses his appetite. This happens partially due to constant nausea that can be followed by stomachaches and vomiting. Sensitivity to bright light Another sign of meningitis is a fear of bright light because it causes watering of the child’s eyes and nausea together with a headache that becomes stronger. The rigidity of the occipital muscles A child with meningitis may be in a particularly recognizable position: lying on his side with his head thrown back and his legs bent. Attempts to unbend his neck are often not successful. Inability to unbend legs Even if you manage to bend the child’s head to his chest, his legs instantly bend at his knees, and they are impossible to unbend in this position. This phenomenon is called the Brudziński neck sign. With meningitis, the Kernig’s sign also appears, where one cannot completely extend his leg if it’s lifted at approximately 90°. Unfading skin rashes Skin rashes are also possible with meningitis. With this test, it’s very easy to detect a simple rash that is not connected to meningitis. Take a clear glass, apply it to the rash, and press it firmly against the skin until it turns pale. If the spots turn pale together with the skin, the person doesn’t have meningitis. If the rash doesn’t fade, then you should seek medical attention. If you want to know what to do if you suspect a case of meningitis in your loved one, do watch our video until the end! Tell us if you'd experienced meningitis yourself and how you managed the situation in the comment section below! Stay healthy! Disclaimer: We strongly advise you to consult a specialist before beginning any treatment program or making any adjustment to your health care, diet, or/and your lifestyle. Do not remove yourself from any prescribed medications or treatments without consulting your physician. Any and all dietary supplements or nutritional products and treatments discussed in this video are not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any health condition. The information contained in this video is for general information and for educational purposes only. Nothing contained in this video is or shall be or considered, or used as a substitute for, medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Viewers should always seek the advice of a medical practitioner with any questions regarding their health. Never disregard, avoid, or delay obtaining medical advice or following the advice of a physician because of something you have seen or watched. An official project of Bright Side: goo.gl/yjR8DW Visit our website: goo.gl/JTNgRQ
Views: 17287 Health Digest
FUNGAL MENINGITIS FACTS
 
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Thanks For Watching Subscribe to become a part of #TeamHealthApta SUBSCRIBE for awesome videos every day!: LIKE us on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/healthapta FOLLOW us on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/healthapta Want to live forever on the internet? Submit your video to us: Rate, Comment, Share... Thanx and Enjoy the videos.
Views: 361 Health Apta
Candidal Infections - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What are Candidal Infections? Candida is a yeast that likes warm, moist environments like the mouth, where it can cause thrush, and the groin, where it can cause diaper rash and yeast infections. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 155458 Osmosis
Pneumonia - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can be caused by a variety of different pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 587973 Osmosis
Fungal meningitis cases grow, Brooklyn Park woman hopes she's not next
 
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The number of confirmed cases of fungal meningitis linked to a tainted batch of steroid injections produced by a Massachusetts company has grown to 119 in the country; the number of deaths is up to 11. So far, Minnesota has three confirmed cases, but state health officials say that number could grow. Kaye Hlusak says she hopes she's not next. The Brooklyn Park woman says she is not the same person who walked into Medical Advanced Pain Specialists (MAPS) in Maple Grove last August for a routine steroid injection. Almost exactly a month after getting the shot, her health took an alarming turn. "I was vomiting all night long, I couldn't urinate, I was delirious," says Hlusak. "I didn't know where I was." Her husband rushed her to the emergency room. Doctors told her she had pneumonia, a bladder infection and kidney infection. She says she had terrible pains in the lower part of her back where she received her injection. She also had symptoms of stroke, like slurring speech, which persists to this day. The severe symptoms and their cause were a mystery to Hlusak. Then, a few days ago, she got a possible answer. "I was told by someone from MAPS, a woman, last Friday or Saturday night, that the batch that I had received and injected into my back was definitely infected," says Hlusak. "My god, I went crazy." She immediately went into the emergency room for a spinal tap to test for fungal meningitis. Preliminary results showed no evidence of the disease in her system, but she was told a lab will do extensive tests in the next few days. She will have a brain scan done Friday to determine if she had had a stroke. The Centers for Disease Control say several patients have suffered strokes as a result of having meningitis. While in the clear for now, Hlusak says she is skeptical. "I'm beginning to wonder," she says, "because of my slurred speech, my sweating, my dizziness, my, there's a lot of symptoms that are very similar to meningitis and I have them." She makes a point to say she does not hold MAPS in Maple Grove responsible for her condition. "It was the pharmaceutical company that was doing wrong here," she says. "This would never have happened had they been on the ball." Despite her frustration and what she calls an overwhelming fear, she's not wasting her energy on placing blame. "Good Lord, I just hope I get my old self, my crazy, trouble making self back," she says. "That's all I ask." Renee Banot http://www.ccxmedia.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ccxmedia.org/ http://twitter.com/ccxnews 12 News is on Comcast cable channel 12 in the northwest suburbs of Minneapolis and includes the cities Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Crystal, Golden Valley, Maple Grove, New Hope, Osseo, Plymouth and Robbinsdale.
Views: 199 CCX Media
(Bacterial) Meningitis Pathophysiology
 
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Views: 74233 Armando Hasudungan
Meningitis in HIV
 
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Christina M. Marra, MD - Find this and other presentations at http://depts.washington.edu/nwaetc/presentations/?PID=105
Views: 1088 MWAETC: Project ECHO
CSF analysis in meningitis algorithm; when Lumbar puncture is necessary
 
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► Right Now! You can get access to all my hand-written hematology video notes (the notes that I use on my videos) on Patreon...There is a direct link through which you can view, download, print and enjoy! Go to https://www.patreon.com/medicosis Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is crutial to diagnose meningitis, Remember that all types of meningitis have high protein level in the CSF. My FAVORITE BOOK to study Pathology for step 1 USMLE is Goljan , you can check it out here: https://goo.gl/9ojg6M Master your Microbiology/ Neurology/ Infectious diseases for your shelf exam, USMLE, or NCLEX Like us on facebook by clicking on the link: http://riffhold.com/1xn6
Fighting deadly fungi. | Professor Jeremy Day | TEDxYouth@BISHCMC
 
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Professor Jeremy Day explains how clinical trials are used to investigate possible treatments for deadly diseases such as cryptococcal meningitis. Professor Jeremy Day lives in Ho Chi Minh City where he leads the Central Nervous System and HIV Infections Research Group at the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit. The group’s interests include cryptococcal meningitis, talaromycosis, encephalitis, acute bacterial and tuberculous meningitis. Research focuses on large randomized controlled trials powered to survival, designed to inform physician decision making at the point of diagnosis. Intervention trials, conducted throughout Asia and Africa, drive a programme of basic science investigating the ecology, pathogenesis, immunology and drug susceptibility of the pathogens of interest. Jeremy studied medicine and political philosophy at Cambridge University in the UK, and completed specialist training in Infectious Diseases and General Internal Medicine in Edinburgh, London and Manchester in the United Kingdom, and Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 1031 TEDx Talks
Exserohilum & Fungal Meningitis
 
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Exserohilum is a common mold found in soil and on plants, especially grasses. It thrives in warm and humid climates and can cause root rot in some plants. It is a very rare cause of infection in people, but it has been known to cause several different types of infections, including infection in the skin or the cornea, which are typically due to skin or eye trauma. Exserohilum can also cause more invasive forms of infection in the sinuses, lungs, lining of the heart and bone. These infections are believed to occur more likely in people with weak immune systems. Like other fungal infections, Exserohilum infections are not transmitted from person to person. Exserohilum rostratum has been identified as one of the predominant pathogens in the 2012 multistate outbreak of fungal meningitis and other fungal infections associated with contaminated steroid injections. Twenty-three states received contaminated injectable steroids from three lots of the steroids that were associated with the outbreak and were linked to a compounding center in Massachusetts. Hundreds of cases were reported, including dozens deaths. Fungal meningitis occurs when the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord are infected with a fungus. Fungal meningitis is rare and usually caused by the spread of a fungus through blood to the spinal cord. Signs and symptoms of fungal meningitis may include the following: • Fever • Headache • Stiff neck • Nausea and vomiting • Sensitivity to light • Altered mental status During this outbreak, some patients developed spinal or paraspinal infections at the injection site. These conditions could occur on their own or in addition to meningitis. These are just a few things to know about Exserohilum and its role in a recent outbreak of fungal meningitis, to learn more about this or other indoor air quality, health & safety, and environmental issues, please visit the websites shown in the video.
Views: 826 Paul Cochrane
Fungal meningitis outbreak: New England pharmacy executives charged with murder for tainted steroids
 
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For story suggestions please contact [email protected] Two senior executives at a Massachusetts pharmacy have been charged along with 12 others in connection with a 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak in the U.S. The primary fungus responsible for the infection was Exserohilum, a mold commonly found in soil and on plants, which was found in an injectable steroid medication produced by New England Compounding Company. A total of 751 people in 20 states developed meningitis or other infections after being administered the tainted steroids. Sixty-four of those people died. New England Compounding Center co-founder Barry Cadden and head pharmacist Glenn Adam Chin were both charged with 25 counts of second-degree murder. Twelve other employees face lesser charges. Fungal meningitis is usually caused by the spread of fungus through the blood to the spinal cord. It causes inflammation of the meninges covering the spinal cord and the brain. The swelling increases pressure on brain tissue and decreases cerebral blood flow, lowering the oxygen supply to the brain and eventually resulting in death.
Views: 831 News Direct
Discover Remarkable: Special Report -  Inside the Fungal Meningitis Outbreak
 
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EMMY® Award-winning: The national fungal meningitis outbreak has hit close to home for the Saint Joseph Mercy Health System community. Follow health system doctors, hospital leaders, staff and patients as they battle the outbreak, and learn how they piece together this major health crisis as it unfolds - just in time to care for hundreds of patients. Learn more at http://www.stjoeshealth.org/fungaloutbreak
Salamat Dok: Q and A with Dra. Jennifer Justice Manzano | Cryptococcal Meningitis
 
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Subscribe to the ABS-CBN News channel! - http://bit.ly/TheABSCBNNews Watch the full episodes of Salamat Dok on TFC.TV http://bit.ly/SalamatDok-TFCTV and on iWant for Philippine viewers, click: http://bit.ly/SalamatDok-iWant Visit our website at http://news.abs-cbn.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abscbnNEWS Twitter: https://twitter.com/abscbnnews
Views: 541 ABS-CBN News
Fungal Meningitis
 
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Meningitis is an infection of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Fungal meningitis is caused by a number of different types of fungi, some of which are found outdoors and even in some indoor environments. Fungal meningitis gained national attention in 2012 when a multi-state outbreak occurred that is believed to be the result of contaminated steroid injections. Hundreds of cases resulted along with dozens of fatalities. Fungal meningitis is not transmitted from person to person. It can develop after a fungus spreads through the bloodstream from somewhere else in the body, as a result of the fungus being introduced directly into the central nervous system, or from a body site infection next to the central nervous system. Signs and symptoms of fungal meningitis may include the following: • Fever • Headache • Stiff neck • Nausea and vomiting • Sensitivity to light & • Altered mental status Certain diseases, medications and surgical procedures may weaken one's immune system and increase the risk of getting a fungal infection, which can lead to fungal meningitis. Living in certain areas of the United States may also increase a person's risk for fungal lung infections, which can also spread to the brain. For example, bird and bat droppings may contain Histoplasma or Cryptococcus and soil in the Southwestern United States may contain Coccidioides. Even people living and working in contaminated indoor environments may be exposing themselves to types of fungi, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, that have been associated with fungal meningitis. These are just a few things to know about fungal meningitis, to learn more about microbial pathogens or other health and safety, occupational or indoor air quality issues, please visit the websites shown on the screen.
Views: 5155 Paul Cochrane
#120 Fungal brain disease
 
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In 2012, more than 13,000 Americans were inadvertently exposed to contaminated medical equipment, resulting in one of the largest fungal outbreaks in US history. Despite rapid mobilization by the CDC and FDA, 751 patients died from complications of fungal brain infections. But this is more the exception than the rule when it comes to fungal infections of the central nervous system. This week on the BrainWaves podcast, we review the common (and uncommon) clinical, radiographic, and diagnostic features of fungal brain disease. Enjoy! Produced by James E. Siegler. Music by Jahzzar, Swelling, The Insider, and Chris Zabriskie. Sound effects by Mike Koenig, Daniel Simion. BrainWaves' podcasts and online content are intended for medical education only and should not be used for clinical decision making. REFERENCES Kainer MA, Reagan DR, Nguyen DB, Wiese AD, Wise ME, Ward J, Park BJ, Kanago ML, Baumblatt J, Schaefer MK, Berger BE, Marder EP, Min JY, Dunn JR, Smith RM, Dreyzehner J, Jones TF and Tennessee Fungal Meningitis Investigation T. Fungal infections associated with contaminated methylprednisolone in Tennessee. The New England journal of medicine. 2012;367:2194-203. Smith RM, Schaefer MK, Kainer MA, Wise M, Finks J, Duwve J, Fontaine E, Chu A, Carothers B, Reilly A, Fiedler J, Wiese AD, Feaster C, Gibson L, Griese S, Purfield A, Cleveland AA, Benedict K, Harris JR, Brandt ME, Blau D, Jernigan J, Weber JT, Park BJ and Multistate Fungal Infection Outbreak Response T. Fungal infections associated with contaminated methylprednisolone injections. The New England journal of medicine. 2013;369:1598-609. McCotter OZ, Smith RM, Westercamp M, Kerkering TM, Malani AN, Latham R, Peglow SL, Mody RK, Pappas PG and Chiller TM. Update on Multistate Outbreak of Fungal Infections Associated with Contaminated Methylprednisolone Injections, 2012-2014. MMWR Morbidity and mortality weekly report. 2015;64:1200-1. Schwartz S, Kontoyiannis DP, Harrison T and Ruhnke M. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of fungal infections of the CNS. The Lancet Neurology. 2018;17:362-372. Benedict K and Park BJ. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20:349-55. Brouwer MC, Tunkel AR, McKhann GM, 2nd and van de Beek D. Brain abscess. The New England journal of medicine. 2014;371:447-56. Wilson MR, O'Donovan BD, Gelfand JM, Sample HA, Chow FC, Betjemann JP, Shah MP, Richie MB, Gorman MP, Hajj-Ali RA, Calabrese LH, Zorn KC, Chow ED, Greenlee JE, Blum JH, Green G, Khan LM, Banerji D, Langelier C, Bryson-Cahn C, Harrington W, Lingappa JR, Shanbhag NM, Green AJ, Brew BJ, Soldatos A, Strnad L, Doernberg SB, Jay CA, Douglas V, Josephson SA and DeRisi JL. Chronic Meningitis Investigated via Metagenomic Next-Generation Sequencing. JAMA Neurol. 2018. Baddley JW, Salzman D and Pappas PG. Fungal brain abscess in transplant recipients: epidemiologic, microbiologic, and clinical features. Clin Transplant. 2002;16:419-24.
Views: 24 BrainWaves Staff
Meningitis Part 2
 
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This video gives a brief overview of the diagnosis and management of meningitis. For the first part talking about the pathophysiology and causes of meningitis: https://youtu.be/zqpa8QJOGaY For the slides and notes please visit: http://www.letstalkmed.com/meningitis.html If you have any questions or comments please contact us through: [email protected]
Views: 6643 Lets Talk Medicine
Fungal Infections and Antifungal Treatments Ringworm Candida Aspergillus Histoplasmosis
 
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SKIP AHEAD: 0:32 – Intro to Fungi 2:17 – Systemic vs. Opportunistic Mycoses 4:52 – Coccidioidomycosis 5:41 – Histoplasmosis 6:23 – Blastomycosis 6:54 – Geographic Map of Systemic Fungi 7:26 – Cryptococcus 8:17 - Aspergillus 9:30 – PCP and Pneumocystis 10:06 - Zygomycosis (Mucormycosis & Rhizopus) 11:06 – Tineae (Athletes Foot, Ring worm, Tinea Versicolor …) 12:50 – Candida 14:07 – Sporothrix 14:29 – Azoles (Diflucan, Flucanazole, ketoconazole…) 15:20 – Amphotericin B & Nystatin 15:58 - Capsofungin & Micanofungin For the text and pictures in this video please go to my website http://www.stomponstep1.com/fungal-infections-antifungal-treatments-ringworm-candida-aspergillus-histoplasmosis/ Pictures Used: “Coccidioidomycosis_Spherule” by CDC available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coccidioidomycosis_Spherule.jpg via Public Domain ” Histoplasmosis Capsulatum” by CDC available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histoplasmosis#/media/File:Histoplasmosis_capsulatum.jpg via Public Domain “Blastomyces dermatitidis” by CDC available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blastomycosis#/media/File:Blastomyces_dermatitidis_GMS.jpeg via Public Domain Derivative of “Blastomycosis cropped” by Joel Mills available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Blastomycosis_cropped.JPG via Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution-Share Alike Derivative of “Cryptococcus neoformans using a light India ink staining” by CDC available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cryptococcus_neoformans_using_a_light_India_ink_staining_preparation_PHIL_3771_lores.jpg via Public Domain Derivative of “Cryptoccocus Gram Film” by Graham Beards available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cryptococcus_Gram_film.jpg via Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Share Alike Derivative of “Aspergilloma complicating tuberculosis 2” by Yale Rosen available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aspergilloma_complicating_tuberculosis_2.jpg via Creative Commons 2.0 Attribution-Share Alike “Aspergillosis, angioinvasive, intravascular” by Yale Rosen available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/pulmonary_pathology/5390967599 via Creative Commons 2.0 Attribution-Share Alike Derivative of “Zygomycosis/mucormycosis” by Yale Rosen available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/pulmonary_pathology/5390897069 via Creative Commons 2.0 Atribution Share Alike Derivative of “Zygomycosis, Mucormycosis 1” by Yale Rosen available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zygomycosis,_mucormycosis_1.jpg via Creative Commons 2.0 Attribution-Share Alike Derivative of “Zygomycosis” by Nephron available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zygomycosis.jpg via Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution-Share Alike “Ringworm on the arm, or tinea corporis due to Trichophyton mentagrophytes” by CDC available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ringworm_on_the_arm,_or_tinea_corporis_due_to_Trichophyton_mentagrophytes_PHIL_2938_lores.jpg via Public Domain “Teigne - Tinea capitis” by Grook Da Oger available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Teigne_-_Tinea_capitis.jpg via Creative Commons 4.0 International Attribution Share Alike License “Onychomycosis due to Trychophyton rubrum, right and left great toe” by CDC available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Onychomycosis_due_to_Trychophyton_rubrum,_right_and_left_great_toe_PHIL_579_lores.jpg via Public Domain “Tinea versicolor1” by Sarahrosenau available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tinea_versicolor1.jpg via Creative Commons 2.0 Attribution-Share Alike “Candida albicans” by Y Tambe available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Candida_albicans.jpg via Creative Commons 3.0 Unported Attribution-Share Alike License “Human tongue infected with oral candidiasis” by James Heilman available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Human_tongue_infected_with_oral_candidiasis.jpg via Creative Commons 3.0 Unported Attribution-Share Alike
Views: 15893 Stomp On Step 1
UW student dies after meningitis diagnosis
 
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The University of Wisconsin-Madison says a student has died from meningococcal disease.
Views: 93 TODAY’S TMJ4
Meningitis Signs and Symptoms in Babies
 
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For the signs and symptoms of meningitis - https://www.meningitisnow.org/signs Having the knowledge of meningitis symptoms could save you or a loved ones life. Meningitis strikes quickly and can be devastating, babies cannot express how they are feeling, so it is essential for parents to learn all the possible signs and symptoms and to trust their instincts if they suspect something is seriously wrong. For more information on signs and symptoms, please visit our website https://www.meningitisnow.org/signs If you would like to speak to someone you can reach us via our social media channels or via our helpline - 0808 80 10 388 (open 9am-5pm Monday to Friday)
Views: 4282 Meningitis Now
What is meningitis? Signs & Symptoms | Meningitis Now
 
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Learn the signs and symptoms of meningitis - https://www.meningitisnow.org/meningitis-explained/signs-and-symptoms/ Meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges (protective layers around the brain and spinal cord.) Meningitis can be cause by many types of bacteria and also viruses. Bacterial meningitis is life-threatening and urgent medical help is vital. Viral meningitis, while not usually life-threatening, can also cause serious health problems and after effects.
Views: 4482 Meningitis Now
OU Student Tests Positive For Meningitis
 
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A University of Oklahoma student has tested positive for bacterial meningitis, officials say. Eyewitness News 5's Amanda Guerra has the details.
Views: 1815 KOCO 5 News
Stuart Levitz, MD: Fungal Meningitis
 
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Stuart M. Levitz, MD, professor of medicine and microbiology & physiological systems, whose research is focused on combating fungal infections, is closely following the tragic fungal meningitis outbreak that has sickened hundreds of people in 15 states, killing 15 of them, all of whom reportedly received contaminated steroid injections from a Framingham compounding facility. http://www.umassmed.edu/news/2012/research/stuart-levitz-on-fungal-meningitis-outbreak.aspx
Valley Fever: Timely Diagnosis, Early Assessment, and Proper Management
 
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Valley Fever: Timely Diagnosis, Early Assessment, and Proper Management. This activity is intended to help healthcare providers healthcare providers diagnose coccidioidomycosis and manage uncomplicated illness. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at https://wwwdev.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/coccidioidomycosis/videos/Mpeg/ValleyFever-video.mp4
New Test Finds CNS Infections Fast
 
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www.rxwiki.com A new test for meningitis and encephalitis could bring the time needed for results down from three days to one hour. The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis (ME) Panel, approved for marketing Thursday by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), uses a small sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to look for meningitis and encephalitis. This new test, from BioFire Diagnostics L.L.C. in Salt Lake City, looks for 14 pathogens that can indicate these two conditions, according to the FDA. Testing for multiple pathogens at one time could help doctors make diagnoses sooner than they can with current testing methods, which can take up to three days to bring results. The FilmArray ME Panel could give results in about an hour.
Views: 95 RxWikiTV