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Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining
 
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The Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining created this video to educate and inform Utah residents about what the Division does and how it benefits our quality of life.
Views: 750 Utah DOGM
Division of Oil, Gas and Mining Presents at Risk Managements Drone Symposium
 
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On September 25th, Tom Thompson, Wade Kloos, Buck Ehler, Paul Gedge, Anthony Clayson, Ty Hunter and Ben Erickson presented at the Risk Management Drone Symposium on how drones are changing the way we do field work. Tom discussed the Variscite Mine video, which demonstrates the autopilot software that is being used. Tom said, "I am truly thankful for John Webster for helping lead the way with drones being used on the mines he oversees.” Tom also presented on the Kenilworth Project video. This is a massive project being headed up by Kent Philips who has been instrumental in validating and ground truthing the drone data. And finally, Tom presented on the AMR mine closure video. Tom said, “This is one of my favorite projects so far, because this was the first video we did thanks to Susan White and her foresight to utilizing drones for story telling." Tom would like to thank everyone who has helped put all of this hard work together!
Views: 5 Utah DOGM
Student Profile: LLM Oil and Gas Law with Professional Skills - Kieran McLaughlin
 
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Kieran McLaughlin from Glasgow is studying the LLM Oil and Gas Law with Professional Skills. After this he will be staying in Aberdeen for another year to do his Diploma in Professional Legal Practice. Following the Diploma, he has already secured a traineeship with Brodies LLP.
Oil and Gas News l Oil Sands Benefit Canadians Using Berg Chilling Systems Inc.
 
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Learn more about Berg Process Chiller Solutions: http://berg-group.com/ Narrator: Canada’s Oil Sands is energy at work for all Canadians. Don Berggren: We’ve been selling equipment in the oil sands for close to a decade now. What we do mostly in the oil sands is control heat. If we can utilize the heat somewhere else rather than wasting it, that’s perfect. The oil sands are tremendous for Ontario. It’s bringing new opportunities to us; bringing a lot of new jobs. They need a lot of different products and services. It’s great to be a part of it. It means a lot to me when I see the product going to the oil sands. It’s just great to be part of a winning team. Berg process chilling systems can work to help cool recovered flare gases, and control industrial thermal processes with chilling, pumping and freezing equipment to maintain optimal production conditions, enable the separation and recovery of key components, achieve superior financial performance, reduce waste and eliminate environmental pollution. Keep up to date with our oil and gas industry news and trends: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/berg-chilling-systems-inc- Twitter: https//www.twitter.com/bergchilling G+: https://plus.google.com/u/2/b/112838274543821586661/+BerggroupProcess_Chilling
What Is Fracking?
 
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You’ve heard of fracking, and you’re pretty sure lots of people don’t like it, but do you know how it actually works? Learn more at HowStuffWorks.com: http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/hydraulic-fracking.htm Share on Facebook: http://goo.gl/M5kx1i Share on Twitter: http://goo.gl/FbuzEW Subscribe: http://goo.gl/ZYI7Gt Visit our site: http://www.brainstuffshow.com Fracking. You’ve heard of it. You know it’s controversial. But you might not know what it actually involves. Never fear: We’re here to put some fracking knowledge in your brain. Fracking is the delightfully cheeky-sounding nickname for Hydraulic Fracturing... which sounds a little bit less delightful and more like something you do to your enemies in Starcraft. But no! It is something we do to rocks. In the simplest terms, hydraulic fracturing is a way of getting more of the valuable fluids, like oil and natural gas, out of geologic formations under the ground. Deep under earth’s surface, there are deposits of rock that have huge reserves of oil and natural gas within them. But these fossil fuels aren’t like big lakes where you can just stick a straw in and suck. No, these reserves of oil and natural gas are found locked up in pores distributed throughout vast layers of rock, like shale. So how do you get them out at a reasonable pace? Let’s look at a typical fracking setup for something like shale gas: You start with a deep, vertical well, drilling a hole down to the level of the shale you want to mine. The depth will vary, but just for example, one company claims its average fracking well depth is 7,700 feet. That’s deep: almost one and a half miles, or about 2.3 kilometers. When you’re at the right depth, you take a 90-degree turn and continue to drill horizontally, parallel to the target rock layer. This horizontal section of the well can also travel thousands of feet. Now here’s where the “fracturing” comes in. First, you open up holes in the horizontal section of the pipe. Then, you vigorously push a liquid cocktail known as fracking fluid down into the borehole under high pressure. This fracking fluid is usually a mixture of water, some chemical additives -- like acids to help dissolve the rock, and gels to thicken the fluid -- and finally, solid particles called proppants – we’ll get to those in a second. When the mixture reaches the horizontal section of the pipe, it bleeds out through the holes into the surrounding rock, and the extremely high pressure causes the rock to form tons of little fractures, or cracks. Through these cracks, the reserves of fossil fuels contained in the rock can escape into the well to be pumped back up to the surface. What once was entombed in ancient rock is now on the way to powering your car or heating the water for your next shower. And those proppants I mentioned, which are often just grains of sand, help “prop” the cracks in the rock open, so the Earth’s precious bodily fluids continue to escape into the well without the miners applying continuous pressure. So that’s how it works, but then there’s the entirely separate question of whether fracking is a good idea. It’s controversial in many parts of the world. Some people claim it consumes too much fresh water, and worry about what will be done with the fracking fluid after it’s been used. And some opponents wonder if it will create earthquakes, or cause chemical contaminants to leak into our groundwater. SOURCES: http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/hydraulic-fracking.htm/printable http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/media/how-hydraulic-fracturing-works/?ar_a=1 http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-14432401 http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/538082/shale http://geology.utah.gov/surveynotes/gladasked/gladrocks.htm http://www.bfenvironmental.com/pdfs/ChK_-Hydraulic_Fracturing_Fact_Sheet.pdf
Controversial Oil & Gas Bill Passes
 
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Sweeping changes are coming to Colorado's oil and gas industry. The state legislature passed the biggest overhaul of oil and gas regulations in decades.
Views: 100 CBS Denver
How Would You Feel About an Oil Drill-Rig in Your Backyard?
 
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(EnviroNews Utah) – This piece formerly had a sub-header. The title was: How Would You Feel about an Oil Drill Rig in Your Backyard? Helpless Residents of Utah’s Duchesne County Are about to Find out Just How It Feels The transcript is as follows: One of the questions we’ve been evaluating here at EnviroNews as of late is: With American oil and gas exploration exploding like never before, and with that boom being fueled by fracking and other aggressive new technologies, just how far is the oil and gas industry willing to go in order to drill a well in your backyard? And furthermore, in the humble opinion of big oil and gas just what distance is too close... Read/View the full report on EnviroNews here: http://environews.tv/051513-commissioners-vote-unanimously-to-endanger-constituents-by-allowing-oil-wells-closer-to-homes-in-utahs-most-productive-oil-field/
Views: 335 EnviroNews
Utah Children say, "Oil Shale Puts Our Future on the Line"
 
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The weekend of June 20th, 2014, an intergenerational gathering brought together children, guardians, teachers and land defenders at PR Springs, site of the nation's first commercial fuel tar sands strip mine, located in Eastern Utah. In addition to tar sands mining, the region is being threatened by oil shale strip mining, and after a weekend of hiking and exploring the land, fun art and science projects, and discussions with their peers, the children decided to take a field strip to Red Leaf Resources test site in order to see what was going on there, and to deliver a message. Read more at: http://www.tarsandsresist.org/children-at-red-leaf/
Views: 777 Peaceful Uprising
Oil and gas job search - Find the perfect oil job now
 
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Visit http://www.oilandgasjobsearch.com for more information today!
Views: 299 oilandgasjobsearch
Petroleum Engineers Career Video
 
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JOB TITLE: Petroleum Engineers OCCUPATION DESCRIPTION: Devise methods to improve oil and gas extraction and production and determine the need for new or modified tool designs. Oversee drilling and offer technical advice. RELATED JOB TITLES: Completion Engineer, Completions Engineer, Drilling Engineer, Drilling Manager, Engineer, Operations Engineer, Petroleum Engineer, Petroleum Production Engineer, Production Engineer, Reservoir Engineer ONET: 17-2171.00 Learn more about this and other occupations, jobs, and careers at: www.CareerOneStop.org
Views: 24610 CareerOneStop
Oil Drilling In Utah
 
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A plan to auction drilling rights on 110,000 acres of red rock public land in Utah has many conservation groups calling it a holiday present from the Bush administration. Wyatt Andrews has more.
Views: 522 CBS News
A New Way to See the World's Biggest Man-Made Hole
 
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For the first time in six years, the public can get an up-close look at the Rio Tinto Kennecott Bingham Canyon Mine in Utah. It comes after a massive landslide closed the visitors center in 2013. Story: https://fox13now.com/2019/04/26/kennecott-copper-mine-reopens-to-the-public/
Views: 339 FOX 13 News Utah
Canyon Fuel Company’s Sufco mine - Earth Day 2015 Award Recipient
 
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Each year the Utah Board of Oil, Gas and Mining recognizes companies or individuals who exceed regulatory requirements in protecting the environment while extracting essential natural resources.
Views: 386 Utah DOGM
Struggling US coal industry sees Trump as saviour
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now : http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN In the United States, coal workers are fervently hoping that presidential candidate Donald Trump will save their vanishing industry. His rival Hillary Clinton believes in shifting to clean, renewable energy, which does not go down well in coal country. Our correspondent reports from southern Illinois, where Trump is popular with voters. A programme prepared by Patrick Lovett and Elom Marcel Toble.   Visit our website : http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel : http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter : https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 13018 FRANCE 24 English
Mining Careers In WA - Osborne Park WA | (08) 9322 9722
 
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http://westjobs.com.au/jobseeker/mining-careers-wa-australia.html Mining Careers In WA - Osborne Park WA | (08) 9322 9722 Mining careers in WA meaning Western Australia are abundant and this video takes you through what mining companies are looking for. Jobs in Perth and WA for jobseekers. Search Mining jobs, Oil & Gas, Construction, Retail, Banking and Medical jobs. Post own job ads free resume downloads. Call us at (08) 9322 9722. 5/163 Main St, Osborne Park, WA 6017
Views: 87 instantexposure
Earth Drillers Except Oil and Gas
 
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Operate a variety of drills--such as rotary, churn, and pneumatic--to tap sub-surface water and salt deposits, to remove core samples during mineral exploration or soil testing, and to facilitate the use of explosives in mining or construction. May use explosives. Includes horizontal and earth boring machine operators.
Views: 183 mvjf09
Rio Tinto - Electrical Engineers
 
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Watch this insightful video about the life of an Electrical Engineer at Rio Tinto and what makes them get out of bed every morning.
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
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There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 205665 VICE News
Utah Division of Oil, Gas & Mining Board Meeting 9/16/2015
 
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Utah's OGM Board Meeting on September 16, 2015. Briefing scheduled to begin at 9:00 AM (MST)
Storm Brewing: Permanent protest setup at proposed tar sands strip mine
 
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music: http://www.kleebenally.com FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE PR SPRINGS, UTAH--Land defenders have established a permanent protest vigil inside the boundaries of a planned tar sands strip mine in the Book Cliffs of Utah. The Canadian company behind the controversial plan intended to begin construction of the mine this summer, but people have vowed to stop it. U.S. Oil Sands, of Calgary, Alberta, holds leases on 32,000 acres of land traditionally inhabited by Ute people but now controlled by the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration. FOR PHOTOS AND EMBED VIDEO/B-ROLL, GO TO: http://www.TarSandsResist.org/storm-brewing Utah Tar Sands Resistance, Peaceful Uprising and Canyon Country Rising Tide--as well as supporters from throughout the Colorado Plateau--have endorsed the protest vigil. "These beautiful lands that US Oil Sands plans to destroy have been enjoyed by Utahns for decades and were the home for Ute people for hundreds of generations," said Jessica Lee, on behalf of the land defenders. "This tar sands strip mine would cause swift obliteration of multiple ecosystems and severe contributions to climate-change related disasters." The company's immediate plans include spending $60 million dollars on preliminary construction. US Oil Sands' chemical solvent has never been used for tar sands processing anywhere on the planet. Toxins from the mine pose risks to the Colorado River Basin, which provides drinking water for at least 20 million—including the people of Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego and Phoenix—as well as 15 percent of the nation's produce. Tar sands development in Alberta has poisoned the drinking water for downstream people and wildlife, which indigenous communities there rely upon for food. Tar sands critics have accused the megaproject of continuing genocide against native peoples and spewing more greenhouse-gas emissions than any other project on Earth. The newly established protest vigil at the Utah tar sands project is the latest in a string of persistent setbacks dogging US Oil Sands' fortunes. The company has routinely missed construction goals. US Oil Sands stock price on the Toronto Stock Exchange had dropped 50 percent from its 2013 peak, representing a $100 million loss in value. Worse yet, US Oil Sands lacks a refinery contract, so despite big promises, it's unclear how the company intends to bring its product to market. Utah's five oil refineries—including two in Salt Lake City that currently process Alberta tar sands—remain the most likely candidates. But that does't mean a deal is likely. In reaction to public protest in 2013, which saw people breech the Salt Lake City refinery's gates, Chevron said it would not process Utah tar sands. The other Utah tar sands refinery—Tesoro--is currently seeking regulatory approval to switch off of Alberta tar sands in favor of Uintah Basin crude. Direct action has hurt US Oil Sands before. In July 2013, people shut down construction of the PR Springs test mine and construction of nearby Seep Ride Road for a full day, delivering US Oil Sands a 13 percent stock dip. (for more: http://www.peacefuluprising.org/actioncampaction ) The company still lacks a go-ahead from the Utah Supreme Court. Living Rivers' lawsuit against US Oil Sands and the Division of Water Quality was heard by the court in March. Despite several pristine springs and ponds—water routinely pools even in the company's 10-acre test mine—DWQ ruled there was not sufficient water to require the company to monitor water pollutants caused by the mine. Journalists and supporters are welcome to contact organizers for tours of the remote and beautiful PR Springs. Contact [email protected] Media requests, contact: Jessica Lee, 801-485-2071 ###
Views: 1345 Peaceful Uprising
Trump Privatizes National Parks
 
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President Business is handing public lands to his rich buddies. Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian, hosts of The Young Turks, discuss. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. Read more here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/04/us/trump-bears-ears.html "President Trump said he would dramatically reduce the size of a vast expanse of protected federal land in Utah on Monday, a rollback of some two million acres that is the largest in scale in the nation’s history. The administration said it would shrink Bears Ears National Monument, a sprawling region of red rock canyons, by about 85 percent, and cut another area, Grand Staircase-Escalante, to about half its current size. The move, a reversal of protections put in place by Democratic predecessors, comes as the administration pushes for fewer restrictions and more development on public lands. The decision to reduce Bears Ears is expected to trigger a legal battle that could alter the course of American land conservation, possibly opening millions of protected public acres to oil and gas extraction, mining, logging and other commercial activities. “Some people think that the natural resources of Utah should be controlled by a small handful of very distant bureaucrats located in Washington,” Mr. Trump said, speaking at Utah’s domed State Capitol. “And guess what? They’re wrong.””* Hosts: Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian Cast: Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian *** The Largest Online News Show in the World. Hosted by Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian. LIVE STREAMING weekdays 6-8pm ET. https://goo.gl/tJpj1m Subscribe to The Young Turks on YouTube: https://goo.gl/a3JY9i Like The Young Turks on Facebook: https://goo.gl/txrhrh Follow The Young Turks on Twitter: https://goo.gl/w6ahdV Buy TYT Merch: https://goo.gl/KVysaM Download audio and video of the full two hour show on-demand + the members-only post game show by becoming a member at https://goo.gl/v8E64M. Your membership supports the day to day operations and is vital for our continued success and growth. Young Turk (n), 1. Young progressive or insurgent member of an institution, movement, or political party. 2. A young person who rebels against authority or societal expectations.(American Heritage Dictionary)
Views: 101349 The Young Turks
Oil Drilling Jobs Yes Oil Drilling Jobs
 
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Visit the Oil Drilling Jobs website http://explorationoilandgas.com to discover the secret to landing your dream Oil Drilling Job in a fast and easy way. Sometimes it could be difficult to look for fine details at Oil Work and also oil and gas jobs. Many of us try out very , very hard to get one of several top rated resources of tips about this issue so that you are undoubtedly in the correct place. Read the document listed below for good data. We genuinely do strive to provide you with by far the most up-to-date information on Oil and Gas Jobs -- Oil Work. Whenever looking to decide using just a little info to make use of, might in the end get expensive for you. Hopefully you will find this information useful. To discover solid and useful Oil Drilling Jobs information just click on http://explorationoilandgas.com today
Views: 133 Aryan gurung
The County Seat - Discussing Coal Mining in Southern Utah
 
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We are on location this week and we at the Coal Hollow Mine which if part of Alton Coal and we are at the mine office on site today to bring you a firsthand look at the Alton Coal Operation. We are going to start by taking a look at what the coal mining process is from the day they first scratch the surface to the time they turn it over to the birds the bees and the critters. Watch again here: https://youtu.be/vUio0Vd1UEg Subscribe to our YouTube Channel here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thecountyseat To sign up to get interesting news and updates delivered to your inbox click here: http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/d.jsp?llr=5xgaaniab&p=oi&m=1108537776894&sit=s9dn94ngb&f=6eb166d3-69a2-4ef3-9b95-cbaf87858350 You can watch our most recent episode here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv Check out our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TheCountySeatTV Twitter: https://twitter.com/seattv Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/2/b/117932477921089703696/ YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/thecountyseattv The County Seat Website: http://TheCountySeatTV.com/ Also watch our other channel - At Your Leisure: https://www.youtube.com/user/Boothandcompany A Chadwick Booth & Co. Production 2469 E. 7000 S. Suite 110 Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 (801) 947-8888 Fax: (801) 947-9888 You can Contact us here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv/contactus.htmll You can watch the show on these fantastic channels: http://www.4utah.com/station/listings #TheCountySeat #TCSTV
Views: 175 The County Seat
Trib Talk: Tar sands mining gets the green light
 
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Last week, the Utah Supreme Court tossed out an environmental challenge to a tar sands mine, allowing extraction to move forward on the Tavaputs Plateau. What does this mean for the land, water and economy? On Monday at 12:15 p.m., Alair Emory of Utah Office of Energy Development, Zach Frankel of Utah Rivers Council and Tribune environment reporter Brian Maffly join Jennifer Napier-Pearce to talk about the decision, how U.S. Oil Sands plans to proceed and how this fits into Utah's energy development policy.
Mining 101: Ep 16. What is fracing?
 
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Sign up for our FREE newsletter here: http://bit.ly/ekmnewsletter Keith Schaefer, editor of Oil and Gas Investments Bulletin (http://www.oilandgas-investments.com) explains what fracing is. From wiki: Hydraulic fracturing, often called fracking, fracing or hydrofracking, is the process of initiating and subsequently propagating a fracture in a rock layer, employing the pressure of a fluid as the source of energy. The fracturing, known as a frack job (or frac job), is done from a wellbore drilled into reservoir rock formations, in order to increase the extraction rates and ultimate recovery of oil and natural gas. For More Info, Visit: http://www.oilandgas-investments.com http://www.evenkeelmedia.com
Views: 313 mining101
Spilfyter® #7300542 Oil-Only Pump & Drill Sock Collar and #M-149 Sorbent Rug
 
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Contains absorbent Material encased in a durable sleeve. Designed to collect oil leaks and drips. Convenient one-size-fits-all design. Easy installation and easy removal. You can see the liquid leaking & absorbing vs. the alternative plastic encasing product that is essentially sealed. Pump and drill sock collar is also effective around the silicone seal on the motor that connects to the shaft - it prevents oil squirting or leaking into the ground. The pump and drill sock collar is a better, cleaner and visually accurate product vs. the competitive products used in this setting. Use in the oil, gas, mining or fracking industry for spill control response or prevention. Premium sorbent for extended-use/high durability. Absorbs any oil or hydrocarbon while repelling water. Available in two sizes for a customized fit. Double weight and dimple bonded for strength. Limits costly remediation of soil contaminated by hydrocarbons. Stands up well to vehicle and operator traffic without disintegrating. Place around drilling equipment for cleaner drilling and wellhead maintenance. Use in the oil, gas, mining or fracking industry for spill control response or prevention.
Views: 3979 NPSCorp
Utah Old Coal Mine
 
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Cable system used to transport Coal
Views: 32 Wyatt Millea
Economic Impacts of the Unconventional Oil and Gas Revolution
 
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The CSIS Energy and National Security Program hosted Trevor Houser, Partner at the Rhodium Group, and Mohsen Bonakdarpour, Managing Director for Consulting Group of IHS Economics, to discuss the domestic economic implications of the U.S. oil and gas revolution. As unconventionals production moves out of its nascence and our knowledge of the resource base improves, various impacts slowly begin to unfold. Perhaps most importantly, the economic story slowly comes to light--job growth, the effects on industry (both energy intensive and otherwise) and trade balances. Trevor Houser and Mohsen Bonakdarpour discussed their respective reports on the topic followed by a period for Q&A. David Pumphrey, Senior Adviser with the CSIS Energy and National Security Program, moderated. Trevor Houser is a Partner at the Rhodium Group and leads the firm's energy and natural resources work. He is also a visiting fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, DC, where he writes on energy, commodity and environmental market and policy issues. Mohsen Bonakdarpour, Managing Director for Consulting Group of IHS Economics, is responsible for economic analysis and directs advisory projects across various industry sectors. Mr. Bonakdarpour has experience in global industry and macroeconomic analysis. He has worked with a wide range of clients, helping them to size their markets, predict product demand and to better target their marketing efforts.
The Ooze: a documentary on the Alberta tar sands
 
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Is there a line in the sand dividing the interests of big oil and ordinary people in Alberta, Canada? Amateur documentary-maker Thomas Seal went to find out.
Views: 65565 The Ooze
The Utah Uranium Mining Rush That Never Was | NBC Left Field
 
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Following President Trump's shrinking of the protected areas in Utah's Bears Ears National Monument, speculation grew of a land rush and a move to open more uranium mines in the area. But the prospectors hoping to get rich quick never came. What did happen was a rollback of protected lands, another American affront to Native Americans, and a system of claims and permits that makes "land rushes" a web of paperwork and fieldwork. New to Left Field? SUBSCRIBE: http://nbcnews.to/2rAQzwx FOLLOW NBC LEFT FIELD: Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/2rACLSM Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/2rAsQwp Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/2rAsWUN CALL THE FIELD PHONE: ☎️ (315) LF-FIELD VISIT OUR SITE: http://nbcleftfield.com Video journalist Ali Withers Additional camera Lucas Mullikin __ ABOUT NBC LEFT FIELD: NBC Left Field is a new internationally-minded video troupe that makes short, creative documentaries and features specially designed for social media and set-top boxes. Our small team of cinematographers, journalists, animators and social media gurus aims to unearth stories and breathe creative life into current headlines. While pushing boundaries at home and abroad, NBC Left Field will also be serving as an experimental hub for NBC News style, treatment and audience engagement.
Views: 60773 NBC Left Field
Saving the Strutting Sage Grouse: BYU Studies a Fragile Species
 
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More than 20 years of research by BYU faculty and students is helping fragile sage grouse populations recover. The bird with the incredible chest-shaking, air- bag popping mating ritual has a rare success story in Utah. Video produced by BYU University Communications Producer Julie Walker Cinematographer Brian Wilcox News Release from BYU News: Written by Todd Hollingshead Greater sage grouse is an indicator of healthy western ecosystems Sage grouse are an unmistakable species of bird. When a male wants to attract a mate, they head to a communal breeding ground, called a lek, and puff up air sacs on their chest in a quick motion that makes an unnatural, water-drop-like noise. Words don’t do it any justice; hear for yourself in the video above. But besides being fascinating birds that make sounds you would not expect a bird to make, sage grouse are extremely important indicators of the health of the most widespread ecosystem type in the United States, the sage-steppe ecosystem. Once widespread throughout the Intermountain West, this ecosystem is now fragmented and imperiled. “Sage grouse are a critical part of the ecosystem,” said Tabitha Hughes, an undergraduate student at BYU studying wildlife and wildlands conservation. “If they are doing well, then we know everything else is probably doing well too.” The problem is, the sage grouse has not been doing well this century, in part because of invasive plant species, development and increased oil and gas drilling. A peak population of 16 million sage grouse is now down to between 200,000 and 500,000 birds in the western United States. In Utah, a population of sage grouse in the Strawberry Valley dropped from about 3,500 birds to only 150 by the late 1990s. Since 1998, BYU wildlife conservationists have been leading students to the area, about 50 miles east of BYU’s campus, to help monitor and recover the population. Students help capture the grouse at night so they can put tracking devices on the birds. The automated GPS transmitters then ping satellites four or five times a day, providing rich data for BYU plant and wildlife sciences professor Randy Larsen when he downloads the information each week. “We know exactly where the bird has been, where they nest and where their migration routes are,” Larsen said. “Knowing where they are and how they’re doing is vital. If there’s a healthy population of sage grouse, then the underlying ecosystem of the landscape is healthy and productive – something I think everybody wants.” When one of them dies, Larsen and his students investigate the cause of death and see how they can help improve habitats that contribute to their demise. Thanks to the work of Larsen and his students, the greater sage grouse population in Strawberry Valley is up to nearly 500 birds. The field work, which represents one of the few positive stories for sage grouse across the west, brings paid summer mentoring opportunities for students and has resulted in a number of those students completing either a thesis or dissertation in the field of wildlife conservation. The importance of their work has been underscored this month as the U.S. Forest Service has advanced changes to sage grouse protections in Utah and four other western states. The new changes alter rules put in place in 2015 that were designed to keep the bird from being listed on the endangered species list. The proposed rules, which will change the designation of 1,400 square miles of land, will affect the protection levels for sage grouse in Utah, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming.
Five Mile Pass Mine Shaft Closure Project
 
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Utah has a rich mining history and provides nearly every mineral needed by our modern society, including copper, silver, and uranium. Park City, Eureka, and Moab were established by miners. When the mines no longer produced, they were often simply abandoned leaving hazardous equipment, open shafts, tunnels, and piles of waste rock. The Utah Mined Land Reclamation Act was passed in 1975, making it illegal for mines to be abandoned. In 1977, the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) was created to fund state regulatory and reclamation efforts. SMCRA created the Abandoned Mine Land (AML) fund to pay for the cleanup of mine lands abandoned before 1977. The fund is financed by a tax on coal mining operations. The Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program (AMRP) works to protect the public from dangers of old mines by sealing off access to openings and cleaning up waste. Old mining sites can be intriguing to unsuspecting explorers but can contain dangerous gases, unstable structures and explosives. Stay out and Stay Alive! Many abandoned mines are also links to Utah's history. We strive to strike a balance between public safety and preserving historic and archaeological resources. We do careful historic research and archaeological work, and we consult with landowners, federal agencies, and the State Historic Preservation Office. The Camp Floyd mining district was organized in 1870 by soldiers who prospected for gold and silver in their spare time. The mines here aren’t as well known as the ones in Mercur, about five miles north, but there was initially a lot of enthusiasm about the deposits. Mining on a large scale started in the mid-1890s. Through accounts in old newspapers we can track enthusiasm and optimism giving way to disappointment and decline. The district was active from about 1895 to 1920. The mines and mills supported a town of a few hundred people; but they were closed down and the town basically abandoned by 1930. None of the mine or town buildings survive. This specific mine claim was known as the Old Fred. We know that by 1899, it was about 240 feet deep, being worked with a horse whim. Despite all the work that went into it, this shaft wasn’t productive or profitable, and it wasn’t a major contributor to the success of the district. For more information about the Utah Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program visit ogm.utah.gov.
Views: 254 Utah DOGM
DEEPEST Holes Ever Dug!
 
12:09
Throughout history, humans have drilled their way into the ground; we’ve done some serious digging to penetrate the Earth’s mantle and some of the world’s wildest open-pit mines. With impressive technology and the tools to get the job done, here are 10 of the deepest manmade holes ever dug! SUBSCRIBE for the latest videos: https://goo.gl/7xzjzR Don't forget to CHECK OUT our latest upload: https://goo.gl/LUB8Xw 10. The Darzava Gas Crater Known as the door to hell, the Darzava Gas Crater is a sinkhole which holds the honorable title as one of the most mysterious and unique holes in the world. The crater is around 230 feet wide and 100 feet deep. This natural gas field within an underground cavern is located in Derweze, Turkmenistan. 9. Udachnaya Pipe Mine After mining began in 1971, the site quickly became Russia’s leading diamond enterprise. In 2011, the mine reached its current width of 5,249 by 6,561 feet, and 2,099 feet deep. The mine has estimated reserved of 225.8 million carats (46 tons) with an annual production capacity of 10.4 million carats (2 tons). 8. The Chuquicamata Copper Mine Call it the "poor man's gold" all you want— copper is the most lucrative metal you can recycle. It is around 2,800 feet deep with 103 years dutiful in service, the hole is considered one of the largest holes ever dug into the earth. 7. The Berkeley Pit, Montana The man-made hole is filled with more than 40 billion gallons of acidic water, heavy metals, and an array of unique microscopic lifeforms. So, what happened? Located outside of Butte, Montana, the pit of poison was once so lucrative, it was dubbed "The Richest Hill in the World", with over a billion tons of copper ore, silver, gold and other precious metals extracted from the rock within. 6. The Kimberley Diamond Mine, Africa Digging began in 1866 with the discovery of an 83.5 (1.8 ton) carat, which was quickly named the Star of South Africa, and spawned a diamond rush which caused the open pit mine to reach a diameter of 1,500 feet and a depth of 800 feet— all by hand. 5. IceCube Neutrino Observatory, Antarctica Deployed on strings of 60 DOMs which reach depths of approximately 4,800 to 8,000 feet, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the first detector of its kind— designed to observe the galaxy from deep within the South Pole Ice. 4. Mirny Mine, Russia Considered one of the larger artificial excavated sites on the planet, the mine has a diameter of 4,000 feet and a depth of 1,722 feet. Rumor has it that the gaping orifice can suck helicopters straight out of the sky, though no proof exists to test the tale. 3. The Bingham Canyon Mine, Utah This man-made excavation project contributes to around 19 million tons of copper distributed around the world— an amount which makes sense due to this nature of its size. The mine dips 3,960 feet deep into the earth’s crust and covers 1,900 acres of land. 2. Kola Superdeep Borehole, Russia This next manmade creation is deeper than the deepest part of the ocean, reaching a mind-bending depth of 40,230 feet. This massive super hole stretches almost 8 miles into the Earth and is considered the second longest borehole ever created. 1. Z-44 Chayvo Well, Sakhalin Oblast, Russia In 1949 the average depth of oil drilled was 3,635 feet; by 2008 that number rose to 6,000. In 2012 however, the company Exxon Neftegas completed the z-44 Chayvo well which plummets to an astronomical depth of 40,606 feet.
Views: 5815 What Lurks Below
Best Australian Universities to Study Geophysics
 
02:48
Australian universities to stud geology , geophysics , work in Oil and Gas sector, become geophysicist 0. Australia is currently the 2nd largest LNG exporter and it is expected to become the largest by 2020. Australia also has vast deposits of Shale oil resources. The oil and gas industry always require geologists and Geophysicist to carry out survey and analyze data for technical and economical viability. 1. University of Sydney, Courses UG , PG, PG Research (HDR) , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 90 2. University of Adelaide, Courses UG , PG, PG Research (HDR ) , English Requirements IELTS 6.0, TOEFL 60 3. University of Western Australia, ,Courses UG , PG , Phd , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 82 4. Curtin University, Courses UG , PG , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 79 5. University of Tasmania, Courses PG, English Requirements IELTS 6.0, TOEFL 72 6. Macquarie University, Courses UG , PG , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 83 7. University if Queensland, Courses UG , PG , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 87 bachelor's degree masters degree associates degree masters mba degree online degrees online universities online masters programs business degree masters in education mba degree graduate degree bachelors degree master of education computer science degree college degrees doctorate degree ba degree masters programs graduate school undergraduate degree bs degree phd degree online psychology degree bachelor's degree online online counseling degree graduate program online college degrees master of science online mba degrees online masters in education associates degree online online bachelor degree programs master online online bachelors degree mba degree online online education degrees online history degree online degree programs online it degree accelerated bachelors degree doctorate degree online bachelor degree online masters degree in nursing online social work degree psychology degree online masters degree in social work masters in education online online associates degree accredited online universities online graduate programs online masters degree programs online doctoral programs master's degree or master's degree msc degree teaching degree online masters degree in counseling masters degree in education masters degree in business online teaching degree master of arts online bachelor degree masters of education online masters degree online best online degrees online masters degree masters programs online masters degree in psychology masters in business master degree programs online undergraduate degrees master of business online math degree master's degree in bachelor degree programs degree program masters degree in computer science online nutrition degree teaching degree degree online as degree online phd programs online engineering degree best online masters programs counseling degrees nutrition degree online doctoral programs what is an ma degree what is a masters degree engineering degree online best masters degree bachelor of arts degree education degree online biology degree life experience degree ma program online programs masters education online law degree law degree online best masters degrees masters degree in spanish south university online doctor degree masters university phd programs graduate school programs professional degree bachelor of science degree master of science degree masters degree in law one year masters programs postgraduate degree graduate school search graduate college 1 year masters programs list of masters degree the master's university masters degree online education baccalaureate degree masters degree uk master business online masters masters degree in usa post graduate degree online masters degree education masters school masters degree computer science accredited online bachelor degree online masters programs in education masters or master's online education degree programs masters in education online programs online phd ms master graduate university bachelors degree online online masters education programs
Views: 1072 Viral Videos
J. Brett Harvey: Coal and Gas for the Future
 
01:02:22
Carnegie Mellon University's top-ranked College of Engineering continued its successful Leadership Speakers Series by hosting CONSOL Energy Inc.'s Chairman and CEO J. Brett Harvey, who discussed "CONSOL Energy's Approach to Powering America: Coal and Gas for the Future." Prior to joining CONSOL, Harvey was president and chief executive officer of PacificCorp Energy Inc., a subsidiary of PacifiCorp, one of the nation's largest electric utility companies. A fourth-generation coal miner, Harvey began his career in 1979 with Kaiser Steel Company as a longwall supervisor at the company's Sunnyside Mine in Utah. He advanced to mining superintendent in 1980 and became the mine's general manager in 1982. Two years later, he was elected vice president and general manager of Kaiser Coal of New Mexico. He is now chairman of CONSOL Energy's Board of Directors. In 2003, Harvey received the prestigious Percy Nicholls Award jointly conferred by the Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Inc. and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He holds a bachelor's degree in mining engineering from the University of Utah and in 2000 was the recipient of the John E. Willson Distinguished Alumnus Award. Following Harvey's keynote speech, an expert energy panel discussed critical energy issues. Pradeep K. Khosla, the Dowd University Professor and dean of CMU's College of Engineering, moderated the panel which included: Scott Klara, deputy director of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); CMU's Kelvin Gregory, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering; and CMU's Edward S. Rubin, the Alumni Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science and a professor of engineering and public policy and mechanical engineering. The Carnegie Mellon Engineering Leadership Speakers Series serves as a catalyst for bringing international industry leaders to campus to discuss critical issues from energy and the environment to public policy and cybersecurity. For more, visit: www.cmu.cit.edu
BLM Conference TarSands Strip Mining in Utah
 
01:07:50
Tar Sands stop it now!
Views: 81 John Hamsher
Oil and Gas job search iPhone app
 
00:41
Get the Oil and Gas Job Search app for iPhone and iPod touch https://www.oilandgasjobsearch.com/page/oil-jobs-iphone-app Find Jobs: Keep up to date with the latest job postings wherever you are. Get Alerts: Get push notifications on job alerts that you set. Free:We offer this service completely free of charge
Views: 142 oilandgasjobsearch
Drilling for Oil and Gas
 
07:21
What does drilling for crude oil and natural gas involve? Which kinds of technology are used? What's the difference between drilling on land or in water? How deep do the boreholes go? This film explores the dynamic world of these complex disciplines – from the architecture of a rig through to different offshore platforms. ------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to the OMV YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/OMV Follow our Blog: http://blog.omv.com Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/omv Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/omv Follow us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/omv Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/omv Follow us on XING: http://www.xing.com/company/omv
Views: 5751 OMV
Trump Monument Rollback In Utah Sparks Protests
 
02:25
(5 Dec 2017) President Donald Trump on Monday took the rare step of scaling back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, declaring that "public lands will once again be for public use" in a move cheered by Republican leaders who lobbied him to undo protections they considered overly broad. The decision marks the first time in a half century that a president has undone these types of land protections. Tribal and environmental groups oppose the decision and are expected to go to court in a bid to stop Trump and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Trump made the plan official during a speech at the State Capitol, where he signed proclamations to shrink the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments. Both monuments encompass millions of acres of land. State officials said the protections were overly broad and closed off the area to energy development and other access. Environmental and tribal groups say the designations are needed to protect important archaeological and cultural resources, especially the more than 1.3 million-acre (2,030-square-mile) Bears Ears site featuring thousands of Native American artifacts, including ancient cliff dwellings and petroglyphs. Trump argued that the people of Utah know best how to care for their land. "Some people think that the natural resources of Utah should be controlled by a small handful of very distant bureaucrats located in Washington," Trump said. "And guess what? They're wrong." Roughly 3,000 demonstrators lined up near the State Capitol to protest Trump's announcement. Some held signs that said, "Keep your tiny hands off our public lands," and they chanted, "Lock him up!" A smaller group gathered in support, including some who said they favor potential drilling or mining there that could create jobs. Bears Ears has no oil or gas, Zinke told reporters, though there is coal in Grand Staircase-Escalante. "Bears Ears is a main resource for the native tribes down there, including Navajo, that's where I come from. It provides us with wood for warmth and medicine and overall is a sacred site," Navajo tribe member Shaniah Chee said. Bears Ears, created last December by President Barack Obama, will be reduced by about 85 percent, to 201,876 acres (315 square miles). Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, designated in 1996 by President Bill Clinton, will be reduced from nearly 1.9 million acres (nearly 3,000 square miles) to 1,003,863 acres (1,569 square miles). Both were among a group of 27 monuments that Trump ordered Zinke to review this year. Zinke accompanied Trump aboard Air Force One, as did Utah's Republican U.S. senators, Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee. Hatch and other Utah Republican leaders pushed Trump to launch the review, saying the monuments designated by the former Democratic presidents locked up too much federal land. Trump framed the decision as returning power to the state, saying, "You know and love this land the best and you know the best how to take care of your land." He said the decision would "give back your voice." No president has tried to eliminate a monument, but some have reduced or redrawn the boundaries on 18 occasions, according to the National Park Service. The most recent instance came in 1963, when President John F. Kennedy slightly downsized Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico. Trump's move against Bears Ears, covering lands considered sacred to tribes that long pushed for protections, marks his latest affront to Native Americans. Trump signed an executive order in April directing Zinke to review the protections. Trump is able to upend the protections under the 1906 Antiquities Act, which gives presidents broad authority to declare federal lands as monuments and restrict their use. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/05ebfa44979cc0cf02e5c60b57dd2b14 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 67 AP Archive
Utah citizens at June 30, 2015 Tar Sands hearing.
 
42:43
The Utah Department of Natural Resource's Division of Oil, Gas and Mining held a hearing this morning because a Canadian energy corporation has plans to mine large areas of Utah tar sands. Under state law, a hearing must be held if residents have objections. I was worried nobody would be there to document the proceedings, so I took my camcorder to the event. The first part of the meeting was consumed by representatives for "U.S. Oil Sands", defending the Calgary based company from questions about it's protection of Utah's water resources. The Salt Lake Tribune and the Deseret Morning News did stories on the matter, but I'm pretty sure I was the only one who filmed the meeting. Television crews usually film things getting set up and then leave when important public events get underway. I'm only presenting comments given by the Utah activists and citizens who showed up and elected to speak.I'm only presenting comments given by the Utah activists and citizens who showed up and elected to speak. Obviously I didn't have a tripod. Nothing has been edited except for where the second speaker gives his name. My battery had to be changed. Enjoy: After the public comments, John Baza, who presided over the hearing said, "There are things that have been said here today that have touched me and I am sensitive to those." My opinion is that the corporation will get everything it wants. Am I being cynical again?
Views: 250 Larry Bergan
Tar Sands Oil Extraction - The Dirty Truth
 
11:39
Environmental devastation of the land, water, and air - the largest industrial energy project in the world is extracting crude oil from bitumen found beneath the pristine boreal forest of Alberta, Canada. Effecting a land mass equivalent in size to Florida or England, Both industry and government are putting money before the health and security of its people and the environment. Tar sands take 3 barrels of water to process every barrel of oil extracted. Ninety percent of this water becomes so toxic that it must be stored in tailing ponds. Unfortunately these ponds regularly leach pollution into the third largest watershed in the world. Water depletion, exploitation, privatization and contamination has become one of the most important issues facing humanity this century. Check out my other video on water issues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMmpg35Bym0 and see my other videos to learn about the dark side of fossil fuels. To learn more about tar sands, be sure to check out the featured film sources listed below. Find out more about what you can do and how to support the film makers. Crude Sacrifice http://www.crudesacrifice.com/ Dirty Oil (available to watch online) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA_BBGuCs20 Downstream -- (available to watch online) http://www.babelgum.com/3015242/downstream.html H2Oil http://h2oildoc.com/home/ Petropolis http://www.petropolis-film.com/ Check out a new promising technology to eliminate tailing ponds: http://www.gizmag.com/ionic-liquids-used-to-process-tar-sands/18214/ Tar sands development can be minimized by blocking development of pipelines, such as Keystone XL, that carry the sludge of this incredibly polluting energy project. Tell Canada to clean up this mess and join with Bill McKibben and Josh Fox and let your voice be heard.
Views: 449783 SustainableGuidance
Powered by Public Lands, BLM California's Oil and Gas Program
 
03:52
The Bureau of Land Management in California is responsible for managing one of the most productive individual onshore oil and gas leases in the lower 48 states. Hundreds of land lease holders now extract millions of barrels of oil annually from public lands in California, which cover more than 200,000 acres and 7,900 usable wells. Join us on a virtual tour of oil fields in Kern County. For more information on BLM California, visit blm.gov/california. Video by John Ciccarelli, BLM.
Views: 1137 BLMCALIFORNIA
Trump Monument Rollback In Utah Sparks Protests
 
01:30
(5 Dec 2017) President Donald Trump on Monday took the rare step of scaling back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, declaring that "public lands will once again be for public use" in a move cheered by Republican leaders who lobbied him to undo protections they considered overly broad. The decision marks the first time in a half century that a president has undone these types of land protections. Tribal and environmental groups oppose the decision and are expected to go to court in a bid to stop Trump and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Trump made the plan official during a speech at the State Capitol, where he signed proclamations to shrink the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments. Both monuments encompass millions of acres of land. State officials said the protections were overly broad and closed off the area to energy development and other access. Environmental and tribal groups say the designations are needed to protect important archaeological and cultural resources, especially the more than 1.3 million-acre (2,030-square-mile) Bears Ears site featuring thousands of Native American artifacts, including ancient cliff dwellings and petroglyphs. Trump argued that the people of Utah know best how to care for their land. "Some people think that the natural resources of Utah should be controlled by a small handful of very distant bureaucrats located in Washington," Trump said. "And guess what? They're wrong." Roughly 3,000 demonstrators lined up near the State Capitol to protest Trump's announcement. Some held signs that said, "Keep your tiny hands off our public lands," and they chanted, "Lock him up!" A smaller group gathered in support, including some who said they favor potential drilling or mining there that could create jobs. Bears Ears has no oil or gas, Zinke told reporters, though there is coal in Grand Staircase-Escalante. "Bears Ears is a main resource for the native tribes down there, including Navajo, that's where I come from. It provides us with wood for warmth and medicine and overall is a sacred site," Navajo tribe member Shaniah Chee said. Bears Ears, created last December by President Barack Obama, will be reduced by about 85 percent, to 201,876 acres (315 square miles). Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, designated in 1996 by President Bill Clinton, will be reduced from nearly 1.9 million acres (nearly 3,000 square miles) to 1,003,863 acres (1,569 square miles). Both were among a group of 27 monuments that Trump ordered Zinke to review this year. Zinke accompanied Trump aboard Air Force One, as did Utah's Republican U.S. senators, Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee. Hatch and other Utah Republican leaders pushed Trump to launch the review, saying the monuments designated by the former Democratic presidents locked up too much federal land. Trump framed the decision as returning power to the state, saying, "You know and love this land the best and you know the best how to take care of your land." He said the decision would "give back your voice." No president has tried to eliminate a monument, but some have reduced or redrawn the boundaries on 18 occasions, according to the National Park Service. The most recent instance came in 1963, when President John F. Kennedy slightly downsized Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico. Trump's move against Bears Ears, covering lands considered sacred to tribes that long pushed for protections, marks his latest affront to Native Americans. Trump signed an executive order in April directing Zinke to review the protections. Trump is able to upend the protections under the 1906 Antiquities Act, which gives presidents broad authority to declare federal lands as monuments and restrict their use. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6fc5e9d42e5dc76279dcc37704959f89 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 129 AP Archive
Uinta Basin Hydrocarbon Conference - 4/12/2018
 
03:52:43
Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining Quarterly Collaborative Meeting Presents: UINTA BASIN HYDROCARBON CONFERENCE April 12, 2018 Centennial Event Center Duchesne, Utah - Policy, Innovation and Regulatory Matters - Future of Horizontal Drilling Panel - Energy Innovation - Local Markets, Infrastructure and Processing Program begins at 9:00 a.m. (MST)
Utah's Natural Gas
 
02:05
CCTV's Yakenda McGahee explores the potential of the natural gas industry. Blu Transfuels, LLC, a small company in Utah has big dreams of becoming a major natural gas provider in the U.S.
Geological Survey of Victoria 3D Mine Visualisation @ iMARC 2018
 
01:01
Geological Survey of Victoria Director Paul McDonald introduces the Geological Survey of Victoria 3D mine visualisation at iMARC 2018.
Rose Petroleum CEO discusses change of plan in Utah
 
06:56
Matthew Idiens, chief executive of Rose Petroleum (LON:ROSE), explains the slight change of plan at the company’s Mancos shale acreage in Utah. Rose revealed today it can no longer drill horizontally from the State 1-34 vertical well. The first horizontal well is to be drilled at one of the six new well locations where the company hopes to obtain permits. Idiens tells Proactive Investors why the group is now more confident about the main project being a success than before and discusses the timescale for the new plan.
GAO: More Recoverable Oil in Colorado, Utah, Wyoming Than The Rest of the World Combined?
 
01:38
The Government Accountability Office (GAO) testified to Congress on May 11, 2012 that there is more recoverable oil in Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming than the rest of the world combined.
Views: 337 AL C
S8 Ep13 Utah Oil and Gas Leasing
 
28:52
Leasing land for Oil and Gas in the state of Utah is not as simple as it seems. With the state being composed of Federal Land and State Land, each have their own attached red tape to go through to get a permit. We tackle the difference in the permitting process for Oil and Gas Leases in the state of Utah on today's episode of The County Seat. Watch again here: https://youtu.be/W2rwT1cVBRk Subscribe to our YouTube Channel here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thecountyseat To sign up to get interesting news and updates delivered to your inbox click here: http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/d.jsp?llr=5xgaaniab&p=oi&m=1108537776894&sit=s9dn94ngb&f=6eb166d3-69a2-4ef3-9b95-cbaf87858350 You can watch our most recent episode here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv Check out our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TheCountySeatTV Twitter: https://twitter.com/seattv Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/2/b/117932477921089703696/ YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/thecountyseattv The County Seat Website: http://TheCountySeatTV.com/ Also watch our other channel - At Your Leisure: https://www.youtube.com/user/Boothandcompany A Chadwick Booth & Co. Production 2469 E. 7000 S. Suite 110 Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 (801) 947-8888 Fax: (801) 947-9888 You can Contact us here: http://www.thecountyseat.tv/contactus.htmll You can watch the show on these fantastic channels: http://www.4utah.com/station/listings #TheCountySeat #TCSTV
Views: 86 The County Seat